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This topic contains 74 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  @wesomeWG 6 years, 6 months ago.

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  • #29453

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster
  • #30860

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    To All Subscribers,

     

    As we continue to find ways to make our site more user friendly and interactive, we have added an open forum to all registered users.  We now have over 300 registered users here at Big House Power and it is Coach Kenn’s goal to get his members interacting on all training and miscellaneous topics in one group.

     

    Coach Kenn will be an active member of the forum as well as maintaining the professional and parent forums for our paid members.  Coach Kenn’s goal is to be able to answer very specific questions for his paid members as it relates to their specific issues with programming, staff members, etc for professionals and recruiting, youth training, academics etc for the parents.

     

    Coach Kenn will continue to find ways to promote the site through his social network outlets, specifically his Facebook Personal page, the Tier System Strength Training Fan page, the Tier System Strength Training Group page, the Big House Power Group page, his Twitter account, his LinkedIn account as well as the the BLOG located at tiersystemstrengthtraining.blogspot.com.  Blog posts are also located on the right hand column of our home page.

     

    Check the open forum for updates as well as from the site’s newletter.  We are in the final process of instituting a html newsletter for anyone through constant contact.  The first newsletter from our constant contact account should launch very  soon

     

    As always, thank you for supporting our website and Stay Strong and Healthy

    The Big House Power Team

    WORDS WIN!

  • #30861

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     For those of you who maybe wondering what we offer on the member sites, we have given a sample menu of the professional portal.  If you enter our article icon and then click on Sample of Professional Portal Material, you will get a little taste!

    Thank You for your continued support

    BIG HOUSE POWER

  • #30893

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    This discussion is being started based on a thread from our professional portal site.  Please list your top 3 posterior chain movements as well as the sets and reps schemes you may use for them.  You can add as much justification as you like. Please indicate if you use exercises for different levels of athletes.

     

    1 – Glute Ham Raise – these are one of my humble pie exercises.  When done correctly [the style Dave Tate at Elite FTS taught me].  I prefer 3×10 possibly 3×6 if I have an athlete who can utilize load or bands – all levels

     

    2 – RDL 3×10 this is a great exercise that I actually stopped doing at ASU with my upper level guys and brought it back after Mark Uyeyama of Utah State and now the 49’ers spoke about the importance of it in developing proper position for hang cleans.  Now with my obsession with the athletic position, this exercise is critical in strengthening the musculature that allows an athlete to be in proper alignment in the athletic position, which then leads to almost all positioning in athletics.  I like 8-10 reps because we are getting a lower volume work from squats and cleans

     

    3 – Body Weight Leg Curl – goal is to be able to do 1 rep!!  One of the toughest relative strength exercises out there to perform, more so than the chin up.  Be aware of bigger guys this is a “MAN MAKER”  I once thought this progression of movements to get to accomplish one was great for beginners and lower levels but now my “use of lose it” belief in this one says it should be utilized for all levels to maintain ability to perform, one the athlete can achieve success.  Still have a hard time with actual sets and reps because I have had so few athletes able to do them but, 3×6 keeps coming to mind.  I would use this scheme now whether it is eccentric only or full ROM.

     

     

  • #30894

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     Can you please post a video or an explanation of this exercise?

     

    Thanks

    Rufus

  • #30895

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    I think Coach has all the right exercises.  The three exercises listed have really stood the test of time. 

     

    1) The Glute Ham Raise  can be used in many different ways from using a reactive method like weight releasing to regular bodyweight.  Plus this exercise is really effective, working the hamstring in both hip extension and knee flexion while maintaining hip extension with the gluteals.  A big “bang for you buck exercise.” A bodyweight progression of 3×8, 3×10, 3×12 can allow the athlete to progress with their bodyweight first before moving bands and loads.

     

    2) Along the lines of the bodyweight, I really like the back extension or as others knows them, hyperextensions.  Again, this exercise can be banded and/or loaded and I thnk from a posterior chain stand point, this is another big ”bang for your buck exercise.”  Since this exercise is a lot easier than the Glute Ham Raise, the reps can range from high at 10-15 or low at 6 with weight.  Like Coach said, most of the lower volume high weight work will come from the Core-Supplemental exercises so I tend to usually stick with higher volume of work for this exercise.

     

    3) I’ve always been a big proponent on Good Mornings but athletes have a hard time finding the right body position and through my experience they more or less squat the weight instead of hinging from the hip.  So RDLs have to be next best choice and this is another exercise that has stood the test of time.  Another nice aspect of this exercise is much needed grip work.  If you load up the athlete, grip strength will be worked during this exercise which is never a bad thing.  I’ve noticed the majority of kids with good grip strength, also have good overall/relative strength.

  • #30896

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     Rufus  - what exercise?

  • #30897

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     BACK EXTENSIONS – a forgotten movement with the high praise for GHR’s.  Building a base through back exts can help the process of doing GHR raises correctly.  I also like iso back extensions as a great movement in our BLOCK ZERO work as well as varying the tempo of mid point contractions ala regime work.

     

    You are right on about athletes and good mornings.  I think poor abdominal strength in athletes is a main cause of this also.

  • #30898

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    I like the banded Good Morning or a Good Morning on the Power Squat Machine.  Both of these methods force the athlete into a good hip hinge position but as far as a barbell or SSB, the athletes have a hard time finding the groove of the movement. 

     

    I also think Single-Leg RDL variations are quite beneficial towards higher level athletes.  I like the multi-planar training effect that both the hamstring and glute recieve during the exercise but when it comes down to novice or intermediate athletes, nothing is better than sticking to the basics.

     

    At times I want to consider Deadlift a Posterior Chain because of the heavy influence it has on the Hamstring, Glutes, and Erectors as well as the Lats, Upper Back and Scapular Stabilizers.  And like you said on the Mike Robertson podcast, Deadlifts will make you big.  But a big problem I run into with Deadlifts is making sure the athlete isn’t performing a Stiff-Legged Deadlift instead.  Athletes tend to lack a hip and knee extensor rythm where their knees will lockout first leaving the athlete to complete a heavy Stiff-Legged Deadlift.

     

    Coach, what’s your take on Reverse Hypers?

  • #30899

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     

    Tolzman and House,
     
    I like your thinking…..
     
    There are many ways to skin a cat in the posterior chain; one way I look at it is how you sequence the firing of the PC. What are the needs of the athlete? Is it total posterior chain development or is it just parts of the chain—–hamstring development, glute development or upper/lower back development? I also try to look at if the movement is based off of dynamic or strength movement.
    Also, with respect to strength development, the most important aspect I believe (for an athlete) is to train the PC keeping in mind the action of deceleration.  
    Upper body PC-
    #1 Emphasis/Priority- Scapular stability/mobility
    #2 Emphasis/Priority- Lat/ Trap development
    Lower body PC-
    #1 Emphasis/Priority -Glute development
    #2 Emphasis/ Priority - Hamstring development
     
    LB PC Exercise 1- Good Morning
     
    Although the exercise can make some people tight in the Lower back, I have gotten back to barbell good mornings…somewhere in the 3×6-8 range. I think you can get a tremendous stretch throughout the hamstring with this exercise, and it develops the PC greatly. It also, from my own training and from what I have ascertained, develops the body like the chain it should be sequenced in. I.E. – you begin the movement with flexion of the hip that in turn loads the glutes, and keeps creating tension downward to the hamstrings. I compare this to just like the Glute Ham machine, as you extend the back it fires the Glutes then for the finish you have to contract the Hammys, for perfect the sequence of the chain.  I believe that GM’s is also a great movement to teach the Block 0 athletes as well because it teaches hip position awareness and gets them to “squat back” so to speak….. Just like Coach Uyeyama has a good point for RDLs to get the athlete to hinge their hips, this actually loads the lumbar and the hips directly (in-turn leading to core stability).However, it?s not a staple of my annual plan, just for variation in the offseason. If we?re doing it in-season, it?s on the lighter side, mainly trying to get that stretch. I have found that if I have problems with people ?squatting? instead of hitching at the hips, I start them out seated on the bench, with the legs straight.
     
     
    LB PC Exercise 2- Glute-Ham Machine
     
  • #30900

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    I am sorry.  Could you pleas post a video of the Bodyweight Curl?

     

    Also, I really enjoyed your interview with Mike Robertson.

     

    Rufus

  • #30901

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     Rufus,

    Head to our home page https://www.bighousepower.com  It is the 1st video on the left 

  • #30902

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     Band GM’s are great and I do like the power squat gm’s myself.  Any SL work is tremendous.  I do not do enough of it.  I actually like SL HIP BRIDGE TO CURL ON A STABILITY BALL.  The best way to start the progression of the DL with newbies is either the high handle hex bar or starting the pull off of 2 45# plates.  This gets the athlete in a very efficient starting stance based on Athletic Position Principles.  I think when you employ jump mechanics with in you beginner program you can help the hip, knee rhythm you were talking about.

     

    Reverse Hyper’s – I was wondering when this was going to come about.  I prefer reverse hypers as a regeneration tool for the low back and hamstrings or as a in season movement.  I love it for back traction if you allow yourself to let it “pull” you through in the bottom position.  I have done the fairly heavy in my own training but have found my greatest benefits have been in pre activity prep and recovery

  • #30903

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     Great Points by Sandeen,

    A couple of notes, as I am a fan of powerlift, their rolling GHR’s actually acts as an assistance to performing the movement therefore leaving some of the true strength desired to be fictitious.  When I was able to do a set of 15 reps on the rolling GHR, Dave Tate visited us at ASU and we rigged the pads so they couldn’t  move, I barely got 1.  As far as Block Zero and GM’s, remember these are beginner’s to your program or just starting fresh.  Younger athletes do not have the upper back musculature to support a external load on their back.  This does not help when axial loading a younger athletes spine, especially if the bar slides down the back.  I would stick to Back Extensions etc and keep the barbell work for the highly advanced.  Also, I would hold the GM only for those athletes who actually have shown a true understanding of the goals of athletic development.  Guys who are counting down the clock and who just do the workout rather than DO the work out will get you an weight room related injury that we all don’t need.

     

    PS Chris, great post, you have come a long way from the intern who ran around our weight room like a chicken withhis head cut off!  Good Stuff

  • #30904

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     

               First of all great website.

      1.Glute ham raise

      2.Pullthroughs; 3-4×10-12 could be done with band or cable.I like the idea the athlete has slight forward lean while pushing the hips back and driving  hips forward to extension.

      3.Deadlifts standing on plates; 5-6 reps much more and athlete tends to straight leg but depends on athlete.Plates are just high enough to increase glute and hamstring activation but not too high that mechanics breakdown.Also helps with flexibility.

     

  • #30905

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     Pull Thru’s, Those are a staple in my own pre activity prep work.  I love those.  Deficit Deadlifts sick hamstrings,  I got another one LOW BOX SQUATS

  • #30906

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Along the lines of the Pull Thru, Kettlebell/DB swings are great.  Also Slideboard Leg Curl is another great exercise for the posterior chain.

  • #30907

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     

       Coach

      Do you use low box squats at anytime in your program? How low box do you use?

  • #30908

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     I only use them for my own program and do them only in a descending box fashion.  My oldest son because of his training progression uses a 12″ box as his normal box and that is LOW.  Everyone else usually right around parallel because most of my athletes ROM/Mobility/Flexibility in the squat movement in particular the back squat have needed work.  I would prefer to have the box slightly lower then parallel or deeper if the proper position of the lower back can be maintained.  What I mean in no lordosis.

  • #30909

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    1)  Kettlebell Swings

    2)  RDL’s

    3)  Rev. Hyper/Back Ext.

     

    I am a huge believer in KB’s.  They are great for posterior chain development.  I also agree w/ House on RDL’s and the relationship w/ Hang Cleans.  We recently started a 6 x 3 Rep Clean Progression  in Tier 2 to clean up our Hang Clean technique–RDL/Shrug Pull/Clean Pull  placing an emphasis on getting in the RDL position.

  • #30910

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    I’d have to go with the following.

     

    1. RDLs

    2. Glute/Hams

    3. I rotate often with Manual resistances hamstring curls, double/single leg towel curls with a towel on the platform to isolate the hamstring and increase hip strength/stability, or SB Curls with a band for added resistance. I can change the tempo of each exercise as well. Also, love the band pull-throughs as well.

  • #30911

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    I would be curious as to everyone’s thoughts on the attached article on Glute training?

     

    https://www.tmuscle.com/free_online_article/sports_body_training_performance/dispelling_the_glute_myth 

  • #30912

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     I have read this article – GREAT read.  The hip thrust I have tried and really like, I will be  adding in the thrust into my athletes program in the future.  I am going to some tomorrow, thanks for reminding me

  • #30913

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     A couple of great points by everyone, especially Sandeen.

     

    With respect to the Lower Posterior Chain (LPC), as Sandeen said, we have to learn to focus on why we are training it and where it falls in our annual plan. While we can train the accelerators all we want, we must train the brakes (hamstrings and glutes). I think many coaches view LPC training and solely glutes/hamstrings/low back work, but why and when? After speaking with House and how 7on7 has progressed over the years, it is not adviseable to do heavy LPC work on the hamstrings during the week because of all the stop/start/change direction that our kids will do on their own AFTER we run them 3-4 days a week. I think we are just asking for a hamstring pull when it comes to that regard.

     

    I am beginning to feel we need to wave our exercise selections throughout our plan to make sure we are getting quality LPC work without the soreness and complaints from our sport coaches that “their hammys are sore.” Can we work up to a Single Leg Barbell RDL after 6-12 weeks of developmental training? Sure. But do they need to be doing that during their inseason period? Would a double leg band hip lift or barbell thruster serve the same purpose? How about  RDLs instead of deadlifts or SB Hip Lifts instead of SB curls? I almost feel like we need to build our pyramid right up to the beginning of the season with exercise variety, tempo and intensity and then scale back down as we get further into the competitive season. Much similar to what I’ve seen with DE training and squatting/benching. As they progress, should we be adding chains or taking them off? I prefer the latter.

     

    Also, as with everyone else’s program, their certainly needs to be a progression of LPC development and strength throughout our athletes’ career of training. Solely doing glute-hams because they are the “king” of LPC movements will limit the athlete’s ability to continue to progress. Remember, if the athlete is swinging and using momentum to pull themselves up, are they really getting maximum bang for their buck? Look at reverse hypers…are they supposed to be hyperextending the back OR extending the glutes? Analyze the next time you or your athlete is doing a Reverse Hyper and see/feel if you are really extending your hips or if you are just swinging the plates up and squeezing your lower back.

     

    Just a brief outline of where I think athletes can progress through their LPC movements:

     

    Beginners:

    1) Partner Glute-Ham Raise (Slow eccentric with minimal PUSH off the ground).

     

    2) RDL (for hip-hinge coaching cues, athletic positioning and heel drive).

     

    3) Single leg and double leg hip lifts and bridges. (I had our female basketball team doing sl hip lifts and they were CRAMPING. This goes to show you that athletes have never really used their LPC muscles and have gotten away with compensations and strengths of their anterior chain musculature.

     

     

    Intermediates:

    1) Glute-Ham Raise (Much like upper body bodyweight PULLING movements, loaded movements are needed to strengthen the surrounding musculature before progressing to a bodyweight movement) E.g. dumbbell/barbell rows to strengthen the inverted row.

     

    2) Plate/Stability Ball/Valside/Slideboard leg curl: Very rarely does an athlete exert isolated knee flexion. We need hip extension with knee flexion for maximum development. Any opportunity to have an athlete keep their hips up WHILE performing a leg curl will

  • #30925

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster
     
     
    Crsandeen5, I read your post about the posterior chain exercises. I would also like to pick your brain about how you format your tier system. I can be reached at NewDLcoach@aol.com

     

     

  • #30926

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     No problem. I will email you at your address. 

     

     

  • #30927

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Can I get a copy of that as well. My email is johndavis@hammondhenry.com

  • #30937

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Does anyone know a good way to set up a general conditioning program for athletics? I’m talking about something simple that I could give to the coaches/athletes for them to follow for offseason/inseason. I know everyone does things differently but I’m trying to put together a “time line” for everyone to follow and I’m really running into some problems. Thank you for any help or advice you have

  • #30938

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     Are you referring specifically to a running program?  If so how many weeks and what level of athletes?

  • #30939

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    2-3 days a week and dealing with high school athletes. I’m trying to put together a conditioning program for the coaches I work with. The coaches want to help me out and be more involved with there athletes. I decided to have them handle summer conditioning while I stayed in the weightroom. I was trying to put together somethng simple to follow for conditoning put it’s harder than I thought it would be. I was trying to put together a spread sheet format and letting them understand why I’m making them do the conditioning and what to focus on. Any suggestions?

  • #30940

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Jlinden66,

     

    From a conditioning standpoint, in which I beleive you are referring to Aerobic Capacity, I would look into Tempo Work by the late Charlie Francis.  This method has been adopted by many Collegiate coaches throughout the country and has been proven to be very effective.  Taken from Charlie Francis Training System by Charlie Francis

     

    “Tempo runs are extensive runs at 65-75% intensity used to facilitate recovery, and improve cardio-vascular fitness.  Increased capillarization of muscle also occurs.”

     

    “Tempo, or rythmic running, is done at 65-75 percent of maximum speed.  A total volume of 2,000-3,000 meters per training session can be done.  Between sessions of 200-300 meters (i.e. 2-3 x 100 meters or 1×2 300 meters) core strength elements can be emphasized – abdominals/lower back, upper chest, upper back – via push-ups, sit-ups, medicine ball work.”

     

    Note: These recommendations made by Charlie Francis were for his sprinters.

     

    Pittsburgh Physical Preparation Coach, James Smith, goes into detail about how he applies the Tempo Running to his Small Skill, Big Skill, and Specialists in his DVD American Football Skill Positions: Bioenergetic Sequencing in the Development of Sport Form. I highly recommend the DVD, if you’re unfamiliar with his work, go to Elitefts.com and read some of his posts on the Q&A section as well as his Articles.

     

    Keep in mind that, this is only one way to skin the cat.  There are many ways to condition the athlete and you will find that many have their own opinions on the subject. Do the proper research and you will find the best way to condition your athletes and your fellow coaches will come to realize the benefits that come with well conditioned athletes. 

     

    Husker Power has some sample programs which includes a Summer Program.  Understand that the programs may or may not be used by the Cornhuskers but can be used as a reference to see other ways to implement and promote Aerobic Capacity sessions.

     

    Good luck.

     

    Chris Tolzman

  • #30941

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Chris,

     

    Thank you for the help. I’m trying to keep it really simple for all the coaches. I will take a look and if I have more questions I will let you know.

     

    Thanks again,

     

    Jesse

  • #30942

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     When looking at what I believe you are trying to accomplish it is my opinion that you look at it from the bare necessities of conditioning regardless of energy systems demands of the sport.  If I were setting up a 12 week general program I would start with program development either 3×4 weeks or 4×3 weeks stages.  The first stage would be long ATP-LACTIC ACID high end work.   This would mean 300 yard shuttle and 2 minute runs. You then reduce the distance of the runs to gassers, 1/2 gassers, 110’s etc.  Then to 60 yards or less runs etc.  Depending on how you structure it you would add in a change of direction period with basic programmed agility work.  I am guessing you are not going to worry about position specific work until they return to campus.  Remember I am talking about 2 days per week specifically for conditioning.  Linear or Lateral Speed would be seperate

     

    Hope this helps

    WORDS WIN

    COACH KENN

  • #30943

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    YES! This is what I’m trying to do. Something super basic that the coaches can do with little detail. Three things…distance, time goal, and recovery. 

     

    Thank you for the help

    Jesse

  • #30944

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Quick question, why don’t I see more programs doing snatches? I grew up on Olympic lifting and I see so many benefits from doing the snatch. From my experience they are actually one of the easier lifts to teach. Do other coaches not feel confortable teaching it, or am I missing something?

     

    Thank you,

     

    Jesse

     

  • #30945

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     Jesse,

    Here is my opinion, I reserve the right to be wrong.  There are still programs that are implementing snatches into their programs although the number has dramatically decreased from when I started.

    Several general issues I see

    1 – Not as many strength coaches are coming  up through OL coaching

    2 – Not as many strength coaches who participated in college athletics have been exposed to the snatch

    3 – Coaches in this era are choosing more plyometric and med ball throws as a replacement to the OL’s

     

    As for me, I was turned on to the clean grip snatch by Chris Doyle when I followed him at UTAH and we use it as a teaching movement for the clean.  I do Like this movement.  The pure wide grip snatch to me, especially in this era is a exercise I classify as a higher risk reward and the major reason goes all the way back to youth development.  Athletes shoulder capsules are not as strong as they used to.  I as many of my colleagues are seeing across the board a increase in athletes entering college with major shoulder issues some already with surgeries on their resume.  I truly believe the shoulder joint of athletes has lost some of it’s strength because our kids don’t play at playgrounds on the monkey bars and several of my closest confidants agree that this is the case.  Not that is just one example but you get what I mean.  Also athletes are not getting exposed to Overhead pressing before their shoulders take a beating is sports such as football and wrestling and this is reducing the overall strength and stability of the shoulder capsule.

     

    As for me I prefer the clean to focus on, so I spend my time honing those skills.  We are coaching athletes not lifters, our time is limited.  I focus on the bang for my buck and build quality progression to ensure a solid technical lift for my guys.

     

    Hope this helps

    WORDS WIN

    COACH KENN  Big House

  • #30960

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Coach,

     

    I was wondering what you look for when you design a PAP for a certain block of training.  Are there certain PAP criteria that needs to be met for each day or block?  Although, I have been using the components of Parisi’s Dynamic Warm-Up Method, Chris Doyle’s Dynamic Warm-Up for All Sports, and Magnificent Mobility to name a few, I was thinking about how efficient your various PAP look.  When looking at the Movement Prep, I feel that the most efficient, time wise, is the most advantageous. 

     

    Thanks for you insight!

  • #30961

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     My first real successful PAP program I developed in my garage and when I brought it to my athletes at ASU if was a tremendous success, especially in breaking off our Block Zero athletes

    This was the basic template

    Movement 1 – Total Body Exercise/Posterior Chain

    Movement 2 – Power Zone/Core

    Movement 3 – Iso Progression Lower Body [Static]

    Movement 4 – Movement Lower Body [Dynamic]

    Movement 5 – Iso Progression Upper Body [Static]

    Movement 6 – Movement Upper Body [Dynamic]

     

    This was done as a circuit for 2-3 rotations

     

    This was a great work out in itself.  I always go back to it when I start thinking too much.  I add in corrective/prehab type movements in our Preparation Progression for Tier 1 Movements.  This is usually 3-4 sets depending on starting load for Tier 1 Work Sets

     

    I will grab some examples of this PAP template and post to Professional Site.

     

    Sorry for the delay

     

    WORDS WIN

    Coach Kenn

  • #30962

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    I think I have stolen almost everything I do from Coach Kenn, however my athletes go through their Pre-Activity Prep a little different. I like our athletes to do as much as possible on their feet, so our Movment 1 is always done standing and usually using the three positions of feet narrow, normal, wide. I think core work is core work, I copy Coach Kenn on this one. I like, but do not love Isometric work so in place of that we have our athletics do some sort of in place movement, something where there hands and/or feet are in a fixed position. Our dynamic movments involve our athletes picking up and putting down there limbs. I think this set up of PAP is true athlete based training as we are warming up the areas that need the most attention. My training and my athletes training have been more effective using the PAP template. I’ve broken down my basic template below. If anyone else using anything different I would love for other people to post their templates.

     

     

    Movement 1- Total Body/Posterior Chain – but always done standing ( Mini Band Pull-Thru’s, Good Mornings, RDL to Shrug)

    Movement 2- Power Zone/Core – just like Coach Kenn

    Movement 3- Lower Body/ Feet in Fixed Position ( Band OH Squat to Box, Bar OH Squat to Box, SL Squat to Box, Box Squat & Press)

    Movement 4 – Upper Body/ Limbs in Fixed Position (Band Scap Pinch Vertical and Horizoantal, Wall Slides, Band Up-Right Row & Pull)

    Movement 5 – Lower Body Dynamic (Usually some sort of Matrix: Lunge Matrix, Uncommon Lunge Matrix, Step-Up Matrix)

    Movement 6- Upper Body Dynamic (Upper Body Step-Up Linear and Lateral, Med-Ball Walk-Up and Walk-Over)

  • #30963

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     Csweets

    Great points, And like how you made it your own.  One of my number 1 goals of this site and how I educated is stimulate the thought process.  Some of the things you incorporate into you PAP is what I am doing in my MMAP that coincides with my preparation sets for the Tier 1 Exercises.  This is what I call preparation progression.  More to come on that 

    MMAP = movement mobility activity prep and usually will have what I consider basic correctives for that correlate to the top exercise of the day.  This was something that me and my former staff member Byran Dermondy were starting to look at while we were working together.  Bryan is the man on corrective movement!!!!!

  • #30972

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Coach,

     

    What’s your take on Cluster sets for Max Strength development?  I’ve been experimenting with both straight sets and climbing sets but have never really tried clusters and their place in the max strength development realm.  I was just wanting to know what your opinion was on the pros and cons of clusters.  Thanks for continually sparking the thought process!

     

    Thanks,

     

    Chris Tolzman

  • #30973

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     Chris,

    Can’t lie to you, I am sure their are people out there with more experience in cluster sets than I am.  Here is how I have used them and manipulated them.

    1 – Reset Reps – on almost every pull we do from the floor we will do what I call a reset rep.  This is where the athlete steps away from the bar, gathers themselves and approaches the bar with the intent to have perfect posture/athletic position/stance.  The major difference in this and clusters is there is no specific rest interval.

    2 – I have used cluster in what I would call metabolic conditioning.  This is where I will work up to a 20 rep cluster for the squat and bench to gauge our ability to maintain a certain level of strength for a period of time.  We usually start with 85-88% of their max with a 35 second beep.  If they athlete is going strong we will up the load and in some cases have increased over 100% of their previous maximum

     

    Most cluster sets are based on 20 second rest b/w reps and are used in my opinion to exceed the estimated maximum charts for high % training loads 85% and above.  My former colleague and NY Jets Strength Coach Bryan Dermody is a huge fan of cluster work and I have seen him get tremendous results from them.

     

    WORDS WIN

    Coach Kenn

  • #30974

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Coach,

     

    Thanks for the quick response.  While on the topic of strength development, are they any Prilepin Chart guidelines that you abide by while programming?  Recently I’ve been assigning rep ranges for total, lower and upper main lifts.  For example, Total: 1-3 Reps/Set | Lower: 1-5 Reps/Set | Upper: 3-6 Reps/Set.  Once I have determined that percentage, I will refer to Prilepin’s Chart to determine the total number of lifts for that cycle, whether it be high, medium, low.  Thanks for letting me pick your brain.

     

    Thanks,

     

    Chris

  • #30975

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     I just presented my rules for utilizing Prilepin’s chart at Stanford.  You are the second person in a week that has asked me about the chart.  First off, yes I have guidelines, and these guidelines were successful with all 4 levels of athletes I used them on. I had a colleague use the rules with his program with similar success.  Sorry to say I am, holding out until I hold my certification and symposium on the Tier System, MAY 2010.  The chart will have a chapter dedicated to it in my 2nd edition of the Coach’s Playbook which will be completed on time for the 3day event.  

  • #30976

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     Coach Kenn,

     

    I have followed your career and your philosophies since your early days at Boise state and have used the Tier System with much success since I first read an article you wrote in the old NSCA Strength and Conditioning Journal.  I recently switched schools to coach track and field with one of my best friends and I sent him you article on WORDS WIN the day it came out.  He loved it and we adopted it as our team “theme” for not only last year but for the duration.  It made a huge difference and they won their first conference title in 35 years.  With everyone back, this year we feel we can make a run at a state title if everything falls correctly.  I am writing this to let you know that the concept of WORDS WIN is putting a great group of athletes in a position to be extremely successful.

     

    On a side note, an ex student of mine is on the strength staff at Stanford and he was very impressed by your presentation.

     

    WORDS WIN!

  • #30979

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Coach Kenn, in one of your ressponses to a coach you sent him or posted a summer running program.  I can’t seem to locate the info. can you post a response here or e-mail it to jrh911@live.com.  thanks.  Are you planning to attent the dport specific seminar in Dallas jan 2011?

  • #30977

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     Thank you very much on the kind words and I am extremely happy the the WORDS WIN concept worked for the athletes.  With that said would you have a problem if I reposted your post on some of my social networks to help promote the WORDS WIN concept as well as the Tier System.  I won’t do anything until I hear back.

    WORDS WIN!

  • #30980

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     Professional Portal – Programming Tab  uploaded 9-2-10.  Not sure if I will be in Dallas if so most likely for AFCA for a few days

  • #30978

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Coach Kenn,

    We would be honored for you to use it. I sent an email to the site contact us address with the same response and a cool team pictue. Let me know if you don’t receive it.

    Thanks,

    Chris

  • #30981

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Coach Kenn,

     

    I have been highly entrigued by the Tier System since I heard you speak at Villanova earlier this year.  I have been lucky enough to have a graduate assistant come to work for us that was at ASU and he showed me some things about the Tier System as well.  I have begun to implement this with both of my teams, and so far so good.  The girls seem to love it.  As of right now I have been using othe percentages set forth by another periodization that I was using.  I know that with the olympic movements you use the Prilipen’s percentages but where exactly do you come up with all of your strength movement percentages? 

     

    Also, from watching your presentations online about the Block Zero program I can really point out all of the problems that you discuss in those presentations.  I just believe that in the long run it will save us time as coaches, to “slow cook” our athletes and not rush them into anything. 

     

    I greatly appreciate your work and hope to implement the Tier System in the future.

     

    Sincerely,

     

    Alan

  • #30982

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     Alan

    Appreciate the comments.  Now that I am working with some middle school age kids, I am thankful for Block Zero.  I now use Prilipen’s Chart for most of my cycles for Tier’s 1-3

    WORDS WIN

    Coach Kenn

  • #30983

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Coach,

     

    I remember you mentioning that you were moving towards having jumps and jump progressions in Tiers 4 and 5.  My question is if you have any certain criteria for each Tier.  For instance, Tier 1 for the Total Body Movements would be Quick Lifts and varations from the floor and Tier 2 for Total Body Movements would be Quick Lifts and variations from the hang.  In your opinion, do you think categorizing and dividing each Tier for certain exercises can have drawbacks or can it help with the decision process?

     

    Never stop thinking.

     

    Thanks Coach,

     

    Chris Tolzman

  • #30991

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Coach,

     

    I was wondering if you could share your opinion on agility training and possible progression you’ve used with success.  I was looking at Parisi’s Agility DVD and Chris Doyle’s Speed/Agility DVD but are there any other resources out there that you’ve found useful?

     

    Thanks Coach,

     

    Chris Tolzman

  • #30984

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    bump

  • #30985

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     You are right on point and I will hopefully be more detailed about what you are speaking about in the 2nd edition.  We are finalizing the publishing contract right now.  But yes when we first started we had specific placement of sub categories of the Big Three, TOTAL LOWER UPPER.  Send me some of your examples and I will compare to some of my thoughts

    WORDS WIN

  • #30986

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    I’m glad that I’m not missing the boat.  I’m really looking forward to the 2nd Edition and the new content that it will bring.  As for categorizing the Tiers:

     

    Total Body

     

    Tier 1: Total Body Lifts & Oly Lifts/Variations from the Floor

    Tier 2: Oly Lifts/Variations from the Hang and Upper Body Oly Lifts

    Tier 3: Oly Lifts/Variations & Total Body Lifts from the Blocks and Upper Body Oly Lifts

    Tier 4: DB Lifts/KB or DB Swings

    Tier 5: Jumps

     

    Lower Body

     

    Tier 1: Free Squat Variations

    Tier 2: Box Squating Variations

    Tier 3: Barbell Single-Leg Exercises

    Tier 4: Dumbbell Single-Leg Exercises

    Tier 5: Bodyweight/Cals

     

    Upper Body:

     

    Tier 1: Barbell Supine Lifts & Horizontal Row Variations

    Tier 2: OH Barbell Lifts & Vertical Pulls

    Tier 3: Incline Lifts & Vertical/Horizontal Pull Variations

    Tier 4: DB Variations & DB Row Variations

    Tier 5: Bodyweight/Cals (Both Pushing and Pulling)

     

    I’ve been continually revising this list so things change from time to time when I remember exercises or learn something new that I want to try.  I could be way off with the placing the exercise types in the right tiers.  Recently I’ve been utilizing a 3×3 tier system with added tiers 4, 5, &6 for only Posterior Chain, UB Pulling Exercises, and Bodyweight/Cals respectively.  This has allowed me to not overthink exercises too much and stick to the basics. 

     

    So it would look like:

     

    Day 1: Total Session

     

    Tier 1: Total Body Lifts & Oly Lifts/Variations from the Floor

    Tier 2: OH Barbell Lifts & Vertical Pulls

    Tier 3: Barbell Single-Leg Exercises

    Tier 4: Posterior Chain: RDL

    Tier 5: UB Pull: Opposite Movement of Upper Tier 2 Combo. (Example Tier 3: DB Row, UB Pull: Chin-Up)

    Tier 6: Bodyweight Cals: Box Jumps

     

    Day 2: Upper Session

     

    Tier 1: Barbell Supine Lifts & Horizontal Row Variations

    Tier 2: Box Squating Variations

    Tier 3: Oly Lifts/Variations & Total Body Lifts from the Blocks and Upper Body Oly Lifts

    Tier 4: Posterior Chain: Partner Back Extension

    Tier 5: UB Pull: Opposite Movement of my Upper Tier 1 Combo. (Example Tier 3: DB Row, UB Pull: Chin-Up)

    Tier 6: Bodyweight Cals: Upper Body Movements (Example: Dips-n-Chins or Push-Ups-n-Chins, etc.)

     

    Day 3: Lower Session

     

    Tier 1: Free Squat Variations

    Tier 2: Oly Lifts/Variations from the Hang and Upper Body Oly Lifts

    Tier 3: Incline

  • #30987

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    If anyone has any suggestions or has done things differently with success, please feel free to chime in.  I’m here to learn from everyone.

  • #30992

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    I am a high school strength coach who loves the Tier System. Since implementing the Tier System two years ago, we have had 14 different kids clean over 300lbs. Some of these kids were under 200lbs in bw and one was 165. We had none when I got here. It has made a huge difference in our athleticism. Last year we also started competing in Olifting and I was wondering if using a TLT rotation instead of a TLU would make a negative impact on our football preparation. I would like to Clean Monday, Squat Wednesday, and Snatch Friday with some jerks thrown into the clean warmup and as a Tier 3 on Wednesday. After talking with CJ Stockel at Flowery Branch in Georgia, I believe the bench press can be de-emphasized because they are going to be good at that because they want to be and many of my athletes try to sneak extra upper body workouts anyway. I want two of our Upper body tiers to be a pulling exercise and two to be a pressing exercise. What do you think?

     

  • #30997

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    I have been doing that exercise for 35 years never knew it had a name. Great exercise. try this- set of db’s clean and press to squat thrust to pushups that constitues one rep increase by one each time- work to a maximum of 10 reps

  • #30993

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    The Tier System is a closed/open design template.  I consider it closed because it is imperative to keep the rotation of the daily session in tact.  This is where the integrity of the system lies, in the structured rotation of exercises/movements within the daily session.  The open side is that you can order your weekly session however it fits your personal philosophy or beliefs.  TLT is a rotation we use for our Track athletes, in particular Jumpers and Sprinters.  In your case, based on the deemphasis of bench press.  {I do little bench pressing with my HS athletes also, we are trying to master push ups and chins ups}, you could also do a T-T-T rotation which would be a very good structure for those who have a strong belief in the Olympic lifts

     

    CJ is great people and a great Olympic Weightlifting Coach.  I hope this helps.

     

    WORDS WIN

    COACH HOUSE 

     

  • #30994

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     PS – I don’t think it would have a negative impact on your football program but I will caution you on leaning too much towards an Olympic lifting training protocol.  I do not believe you can train a sport for another sport.  We must remember OL is a sport in itself as is PL, BB, and Strongman.  These strength disciplines have many aspects that we need to train athletes but, there goals are specific to the platform not the field.

     

  • #30988

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    bump

  • #30995

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Thanks for the feedback and suggestions. We only dabble in OL. Our emphasis is on football. We excel on the clean, struggle with the jerk, and are about in the middle when it comes to snatch. We emphasize the clean and squat (we train low box squats but max on parallel squats). We limit our teaching exercises for the OL and kinda just do the best we can with the OL. I allow a Power Snatch but we require a full clean. Our tier 4 and 5 exercises are jumps, unilateral work, and posterior chain work. Thanks again for your help.

  • #30996

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Coach Kenn,
    I am co-founder of the Georgia Strength Coaches Association and we are interested in talking with you about speaking at our clinic this coming May. I was wondering if you could contact me at floyd-j@harris.k12.ga.us. Our first two years we had Eric Ciano and Neal Peduzzi as our main speakers and last year we had Scott Cochran. We would love to talk with you to see if we could work something out.

  • #30989

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     

  • #30990

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    [QUOTE]Tolzman wrote
     

    I’m glad that I’m not missing the boat.  I’m really looking forward to the 2nd Edition and the new content that it will bring.  As for categorizing the Tiers:

     

    Total Body

     

    Tier 1: Total Body Lifts & Oly Lifts/Variations from the Floor

    Tier 2: Oly Lifts/Variations from the Hang and Upper Body Oly Lifts

    Tier 3: Oly Lifts/Variations & Total Body Lifts from the Blocks and Upper Body Oly Lifts

    Tier 4: DB Lifts/KB or DB Swings

    Tier 5: Jumps

     

    Lower Body

     

    Tier 1: Free Squat Variations

    Tier 2: Box Squating Variations

    Tier 3: Barbell Single-Leg Exercises

    Tier 4: Dumbbell Single-Leg Exercises

    Tier 5: Bodyweight/Cals

     

    Upper Body:

     

    Tier 1: Barbell Supine Lifts & Horizontal Row Variations

    Tier 2: OH Barbell Lifts & Vertical Pulls

    Tier 3: Incline Lifts & Vertical/Horizontal Pull Variations

    Tier 4: DB Variations & DB Row Variations

    Tier 5: Bodyweight/Cals (Both Pushing and Pulling)

     

    I’ve been continually revising this list so things change from time to time when I remember exercises or learn something new that I want to try.  I could be way off with the placing the exercise types in the right tiers.  Recently I’ve been utilizing a 3×3 tier system with added tiers 4, 5, &6 for only Posterior Chain, UB Pulling Exercises, and Bodyweight/Cals respectively.  This has allowed me to not overthink exercises too much and stick to the basics. 

     

    So it would look like:

     

    Day 1: Total Session

     

    Tier 1: Total Body Lifts & Oly Lifts/Variations from the Floor

    Tier 2: OH Barbell Lifts & Vertical Pulls

    Tier 3: Barbell Single-Leg Exercises

    Tier 4: Posterior Chain: RDL

    Tier 5: UB Pull: Opposite Movement of Upper Tier 2 Combo. (Example Tier 3: DB Row, UB Pull: Chin-Up)

    Tier 6: Bodyweight Cals: Box Jumps

     

    Day 2: Upper Session

     

    Tier 1: Barbell Supine Lifts & Horizontal Row Variations

    Tier 2: Box Squating Variations

    Tier 3: Oly Lifts/Variations & Total Body Lifts from the Blocks and Upper Body Oly Lifts

    Tier 4: Posterior Chain: Partner Back Extension

    Tier 5: UB Pull: Opposite Movement of my Upper Tier 1 Combo. (Example Tier 3: DB Row, UB Pull: Chin-Up)

    Tier 6: Bodyweight Cals: Upper Body Movements (Example: Dips-n-Chins or Push-Ups-n-Chins, etc.)

     

    Day 3: Lower Session

     

    Tier 1: Free Squat Variations

    Tier 2: O

  • #31027

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Coach Kenn congrats on you new position.  Are you going to keep this website going.

  • #31028

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     The website will continue and be run by our staff.  We are in the process of getting information from Coach Kenn’s archives to upload to the portals.  Thanks for your patience

  • #31029

    Bartleby83
    Participant

    Great to hear that there will be new stuff on the website / portals.

  • #31030

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    We are in the process of breaking down 3 of Coach Kenn’s 2012 Hammer Strength Clinic Presentations from this year.  This is a tedious process.  We have 2 mini clinics done from the Greenville Clinic.  We will finish this one first and then look at clips from the Phoenix and Atlanta clinics.  Coach spoke on the same topic at those clinics and will look at the best of each and combine the info.

     

    Would you prefer us to update as we go, or wait until the entire presenation is edited before we upload to site.  Either way is fine with us.  Thanks for the support.

     

    Words WIn

     

    BHP Staff

  • #31031

    Bartleby83
    Participant

    Aloha!

     

    I would like to see the whole presentation even if I have to wait longer.

     

    Thanks for your work.

     

    Alex

  • #31032

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Coach Kenn did an awesome job at the 49ers facility last month. Would love to see that type of talk again but without freezing my butt off.

  • #31033

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     A great coach accepts all enviroments to train and learn in.  Don’t woory we are in the process of editing the footage for our professional and full access members

  • #31034

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Haha good point. I should wear a jacket and shut my mouth. I know you have more than a million things going on right now but have have you made any progress on putting together a Block 0 book? I’ve recently been asked by the Athletic Director to develope a program for the middle school (6-8th grade) and I would love to see your progressions and thoughts. 

     

    I’ve put together the foundation of what I want (body weight holds, progressing to body weight movements, and then moving on to dowel movements)  but I would like to see what you would do in my situation.

     

    Thanks for all your help coach,

     

    Jesse

  • #31052

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     I am looking for both a weight and agility workout routine for a 16 year old offensive lineman during the off season??

    this book is difficult to uunderstand

    Mark

The topic ‘General’ is closed to new replies.

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