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This topic contains 204 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  @wesomeWG 7 years, 9 months ago.

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  • #29452

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Professional’s Discussions

  • #30767

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     this is a test

  • #30768

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Just helping you test.  And wanting to say, “Thanks!”  I think you know how long myself and most everyone that comes here, has been waiting for this.

  • #30769

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Thanks Jeff be patient we will continue to upload as we convert files

  • #30770

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Hey Big House.

     

    Thanks for putting this site together! 

     

    -Bud Rasmussen

  • #30771

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     Thx Bud,

    Although we didn’t do the throwers at ASU I will be uploading some of our track and field programs for ASU that they used for there 3 national titles and numerous individual records and champions.  Coach Kraft was a huge supporter as was Coach Jacoby 

  • #30772

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Big House,

     

    This is a great resource! I am excited to be able to further my business and knowledge with your great experience and new platform! Thanks, this will really assist with my projects! FYI the P.E course I conducted last year was a sucess and we will be continuing this next semester, I’ll be in touch! Chiles

  • #30773

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     KChiles 

    Glad you are doing great and thanks for becoming a subscriber.  I heard Nardo is training guys in Cali.  You got to get him aboard.  Just finishing up athletic position article and then some videos to go with it.  This will be good info for your youth program

  • #30774

    Mike
    Participant

    Chiles,

     

    I’m a PE teacher at the high school level. I’d be interested in seeing how you implememented the program in your classes.  Would you be willing to share?

     

    Thanks!

  • #30775

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Hey Guys just wondering how you implement the FMS into your programs. Do you put the corrective exercises in between sets or whatnot? Also how do you implement training that has high tempo, and put these exercises without compromising that tempo? Thanks….

  • #30776

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    I’ve done it two ways. I think pairing the corrective exercises up with the main lifts works well as long as each exercise is done correctly. I’ve also done the corrective exercises on non-lifting days. I think both ways have benefits, but I’m curious to see what other people have done and what has worked for them. To not comprimise tempo, I put my teams on time, you really have to coach your butt off, but I think it can be done. Once again, I’m curious what other people have done.

  • #30777

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    I beleive that all of the FMS is good, and we incorperate it into our program, however I try to get the atheltes to come in on thier own so i can teach it to them. I know with our busy schedules its hard to be hands on individually, however some of our results have been acheieved because we emphasize the little things when it comes to the FMS perscription. Some of the essential stretches that I beleive are the best are:

     

     

    Wallsit with shoulder press

    Modified Thomas test

    Stride with External Rotation

     

     

     

     

  • #30778

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     First off I have the best non PT/ATC in the business when it comes to a coach who knows the FMS and corrective measures – Bryan Dermody.  Guy is a genius breaking down the issues and creating a plan of action when it comes to our screening.  We use the FMS plus several other tests to evaluate all of our incoming athletes, then Coach D formulates their corrective plan and we do it a couple of ways 1 – as a extra work out which we call blitzes, 2 – as part of their Pre Activity Prep and I am now working on putting in some of the more general correctives that will be done during PAP II which is going to be called preparation progression sets.  Examples of this will be up shortly on the Professional portal.  I am old school and use to laugh at the FMS and foam rolling but now in this day and age of athletes coming in with marginal general fitness attributes because free play and PE in grade school is almost non existence and the only real exercise anyone gets is through organized sport, which lead to earlier specific training has caused the true lack of mobility stability and all those favorite words of the gurus to be more pronounced!!!

  • #30779

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    I agree, when foam rolling and the FMS first came out, I though they were things that only “functional” strength coaches used. Now I realize all this stuff is going to benefit my athletes, which is what we are all striving for. Coach Kenn, do you implement Pre Activity Prep year-round? I know that I have seen it on the Spring II Summer programs that you have posted and was wondering if it was year-round or only certain times of the year. Thanks

  • #30780

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     Pre Activity Prep is used every work out regardless of stage of training.  Depending on blocks or if we have a speed agility session before dictates what we do in PAP.  I am finishing some video clips of athletic position technique and the Athletic Position Article will be posted on both portals then I will be doing a general article on PAP

  • #30781

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Regarding the PAP article, I’d like to point out something that you might want to cover in it.  Most PAP/warmup activity consists of dynamic action, as in the case of a speed session.  Regarding PAP for strength sessions, it seems as though you often include isometric holds.  Is there a reason for such?  I’m inclined to include ISO work in the post workout program.  Perhaps just some logic, or train of thought for the preceding, would be appreciated and provide you with more to cover in your article.

     

  • #30782

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    When regarding isometric holds during PAP, my assumption would be to facilitate motor-unit recruitment prior to priority lifts which will enable one to recruit more muscle fibers during a workout.  Isometrics can also assist in producing maximum or near-maximum intramuscular tension.

  • #30783

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     Our PAP is specifically for the strength session we do our movement prep for running and pap for strength we do include iso holds as part of a static and dynamic rotation in my base pap plan that I developed in my garage in PHX.  I remember our Head Football Coach Dirk Koetter watching a work out and he was impressed with our “warm up”  He asked where did I get it I said I developed it in my lab.  He said LAB? I said my garage gym.  Great guy to work for.  He got it!!  This will be discussed.

  • #30784

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    With respect to the PAP, what are some kinds of things you like to do to finish the workout in order for your guys to know that they are done? When Im working with the athletes here and were done with the PC tier at the end of the workout, I feel like we need a exercise to finish the day. Especially on Fridays. Some of the things that I like to do are the basics: Wall sit for time, Farmer/Torpedo walks, Tire flip relay, and battling ropes. What are some ideas that you may have on finishers?

  • #30785

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     We may do a finisher but really my guys hit the vibe plates we have five and we have some protocols we use depending on the session for post recovery

  • #30786

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    The information on this site is amazing.  I  subscribed last week but I having difficulties viewing the videos.  Any suggestions?

  • #30787

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     Only have 1 Video right now with the exception of the home page, not sure but I will look into it.  THX anyone else having problems

  • #30788

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     Just checked on my computer no problems here.

  • #30789

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Coach,

     

    I am having problems as well with both videos, Strength Medley and Get Right Workout.  When I click to view the video, the video goes to a message saying “This is a private video.  If you have been sent the video, please make sure you accept the sender’s friend request.”

  • #30790

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     OK found out what the problem is I set these to private so that members only could see but it is limited to 25 people.  I will have to make these public.  Not too concerned on the home page about public, but wanted some things on the member site to be seen by members only. At this time we are not ready financially to stream direct.  I will make these public for now.  I have just finished editing the athletic position clips and was going to upload that article this week but I will have to see what I can do.  Sorry!!111

  • #30791

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    In reviewing the differences between the 2007 and 2009 templates, I would like to ask about some differences, and the reasons for such.  As I sometimes find that certain protocols are implemented due to limitations/constraints, rather than being the optimal solution.  I will do this across multiple threads, so as to keep the discussion specific.  And like you said in your update email, you need more interaction from the members on the forum.  Here is mine.

     

    It appears that the use of the isomiometric, SMEcc, and dynamic regime is gone.  Is it simply on sabbatical, or did you not find it useful for athletic based strength training?

     

     

  • #30792

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    I can’t speak for Coach Kenn, but he spent something like eight years at ASU, I feel like he had a great grasp on his athletes and what they could handle. He has only been at Louisville for two years and I don’t think you should implement everything right away. Its like using the chains and bands, Coach Kenn doesn’t have everyone use them day one, every program is built upon the last. Perhaps they are protocols that will be worked in eventually. Thats my two sense, I could be wrong, maybe they are not useful for increasing athletic performance.

  • #30793

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     Sabbatical – I love this stuff and put in back into my own training.  The major reason I did not use this much at UofL yet is because I only really like doing this with the Hammer back pieces.  We didn’t have any when I arrived, now have 10 pieces of this equipment.  Regime work will be done with only block 3 and 4.  I tried the regime work with pulldowns and seated rows ok results in the spring but just didn’t look right and feel right to me.  Nothing scientific just an equipment issue for me.  I know this when we were at ASU and implemented regime work = time under tension.  Coach Wenner always knew when we did this because he recognized our guys blowing up.  I like less reps for more time under tension when possible.

  • #30794

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    The last sentence is a lesson for us all.

     

  • #30797

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    In using the medley for a volume/mobility tier, are there general guidelines recommended for determining exercise intervals, # or exercises, time under tension, and rest between medley circuits. 

     

    The best I can gather thus far is that each exercise of the medley is performed on a 1 minute interval for a time under tension of at least 30seconds.  But I haven’t found much on rest periods between sets of the same medley.

     

  • #30798

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     Here is how I have them do a typical medley to make it easy as possible for my guys.  Example – 1 arm row x15 to single arm bench press x10  Athlete completes all 15 reps on row counts 15 seconds and does other arm.  When done head over to bench press station does 1 arm bench press x10 counts 15 does second arm x10 gets a drink of water starts next set.  We have water stations that are relatively close so they are not walking down to the other end of the room.  If double arm approximately 30 count or less.  With some of my work and my high end guys I can give them a stop watch and tell them the are on a certain time interval and they have to keep the tempo.  A large majority of rest intervals are based on my training.  If I can keep the tempo at a broke down 43 years old, the these young strapping lads better do as good or better.  Nothing scientific, I am a artist, I will create the blueprint based on my own and my training partners/staff training sessions.  I go on instincts and practical research of experimenting with my own training and then seeing how my guys respond in a full tilt work out

  • #30799

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Thanks Joe.  I’m only 32.  And while some things do ache that never did before, I still try to set the bar for all I train.  In fact, keeping up with the high school and college kids, is easier than keeping up with my 2 and 4 year olds.  Particularly my 4 year old daughter’s words per minute!

  • #30800

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Do you still after all this time, try to allocate a certain amount of time to specific tiers?  If so, has it changed much from what’s in the Playbook?  I ask, because that really helped me outline a time frame for workouts.  But other than the speed work, not much is written about time intervals.  I know it’s important to move as fast as possible.  But setting a time frame makes it easier for an anal retentive guy to ensure hard work is being done.

     

  • #30801

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     I keep an eye on the clock especially last year when we first arrived.  Our first work out at UofL lasted over 100 minutes, they same work out at ASU lasted 75 for the slowest guy and under 60 for the fastest.  So we had to improve density and tempo and now we are in the 75 minute or less regardless of Block.  Once in a while a heavy squat day of 10 works sets may get to 80 for some non conditioned young linemen but very rarely.

  • #30802

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    I like the changes to the SME tier of 2009.  It’s like a combination of Rep Maxing, Prilepin, and Performance elite cycling.  What is your take on this cycle, over that of the 2007 SME work?  2007 appears to be simply performance elite cycling with volumes at the high end of prilepin’s chart.

     

  • #30803

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     MY STAFF, MY PLAYERS and ME IN PARTICULAR LOVED IT!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!  This is a great variation for our Block 3 and 4 linemen and our guys set PR’s at the end of work outs on week four when we we went 5×5[max] to max 3 to max singles.  The chain progression was what we needed because our triceps strength is down and we need to finish fast and strong for the bench.  We really hit on those cycles.  As of Right now those cycle will repeated in the winter

  • #30795

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Jeff are you a HIT guy???

     

     

  • #30796

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    No.  Tried HIT back in my early 20’s.  Ruined my CNS in about 2 workouts, and decreased my work capacity dramatically.  I’m pretty FT dominant and thus my CNS takes a beating if I push it too hard.  I try to prove that not the case time and again, but always end up with a headache for days, and just literally slow my mental processes to a crawl. 

     

    I’ve always been drawn to those coaches who espouse a full body approach.  I spent a lot of time working with Glenn Pendlay because of that, and also Rippetoe.  I then was drawn to Joe for the same reason.  I’ve been pestering him with questions for about 2 years now I think.

     

  • #30805

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    One of the high school football guys I work with brought something up to me the other day.  They are in their tournament play, and have thus switched to Saturday night games, rather than Friday.  Last week was their first Saturday game.  Because they didn’t have school, this player informed me that he was very lethargic and just not ready to go like usual. 

     

    I understand that it’s simply due to the fact that he didn’t really do anything all day, and just hadn’t really got his mind awake yet.  But he had asked about doing a workout in the AM of game day, to help him wake up.  I don’t suggest this, but have done it.  A purely speed workout prior to a game about 6 hours later, that is.  And it didn’t bother me and actually increased my exposiveness that night.  Has anyone done this?  Suggest it?

     

    I’ve also read something about using video games to stimulate your CNS prior to events.  I can’t remember the details on that one though. 

     

    Anyone have any thoughts?

     

  • #30806

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     I know in 1994 when over seeing the strength work outs at the NCAA T&F Championships at Boise State, I saw Ellen Vanisi [sp?]  Squat 495 for reps and win the shot put later that afternoon as well as watching all the LSU throwers go through a thorough snatch work out before competing.  I know some NFL guys who take the early bus to the games 3 hours and do some med ball work throws etc.  They say Peyton Manning and his wide outs are throw a pretty good script before games.  We would get guys up for a walk through on night games and we also got them up for a quick plyo work out on early games.  I don’t think there is anything wrong with a light plyo jump program and some med ball throws.  But I also wouldn’t recommend it to an athlete I do not train or know much about

  • #30807

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Thanks Joe.

     

    I’m doing my best to get some discussions going on here. 

  • #30808

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    I think that you mentioned you’d have some colleague’s lend their programs for the programming section of the site soon.  I’d like to make a request if possible. 

     

    The football kids that I’ve been working with, have been doing great this year.  They are in tournament play now, with a #1 ranking, and have shut out or drummed almost every opponent this year.  Their success is founded in their work ethic of course, as the guys who come to see me, already have the desire to be better than good.  I thank Joe and many others for furthering my knowledge to the point that I could make a difference in their success. 

     

    Some of the other sport coaches have noticed the play of the team, and I’ve been asked to help with other sports as well.  I just spoke with the basketball coach last night.  He wants me to program the weight training for the entire team. 

     

    So that’s the back story, now on to my request.  I’d like to see some programming for sports with a higher endurance component.  I hate seeing these basketball players get run into the ground, and lose so much of their strength and power.  But at the same time, it’s the nature of the game.  My intent is to prove to the coach (who is willing to listen), that we can keep these guys’ verticals up or improving through the whole season.  Also, some of the same guys I work with who are playing football, will also be playing b-ball soon.

     

    The first thing that comes to mind is simply, what should the emphasis be?  Because b-ball has such a high endurance component, should the volume component of training be prioritized?  I know you like to match weight training emphasis with running emphasis Joe.  But at the same time, because so much time is spent conditioning the legs/lungs, should more time be spent on power/speed in order to keep the VJ up?  I could go on and on, but a simple example would probably cover 95% of my questions.

     

    Thanks!

     

  • #30812

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    I am currently training a few high school athletes that having started their basketball season.  Prior to the start of their season they had been training 2 days per week (upper body and lower body split with hang cleans/variations on alternate days).  All the athletes have made great gains this off season in regards to strength, power and hypertrophy. 

     

    Here is my dilemma.  My athletes have informed me that they will only be training one day a week during their season.  I have tried to explain to them the importance of training 2 days per week to no avail.  I want to continue increasing their strength and power during the season but I am having some difficulty setting up their programs to reach those goals.  I feel like it might be very difficult to reach both of those goals in season while only training 1 day a week. 

     

    I am interested in hearing your recommendations in regards to programming with this particular example.  Should I aim to increase strength and/or power?  Would you recommend that I set up their program based upon a 1×5 elite template (total body)?  Utilizing effort, speed and volume?

     

    I look forward to hearing any and all suggestions.  Thanks

  • #30809

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     I will start off by saying if you are thinking of doing additional plyos with them, I am not a proponent of that during the season for BB.  They have a strenuous plyo work out everday in practice!  Your empahsis in my opinion should be on rentention of leg strength.  This is tough as you mentioned because of the amount of running.  You consider BB a high endurance sport, that is the first time I have really heard someone call it that. There are tremndous amounts of short linear and lateral bursts and jumps in between standing around at times and a slower pace.  A lot of BB is dependant of the teams philosphy, show time or 4 corners.  In Season is much different designing programs than the developmental stage in terms of our beliefs in running and lifting.  Sport practice is looked at differently.  In Season I am looking to keep our guys as strong as possible.

  • #30813

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    1 – Be happy you are getting them 1x per week

    1a – Basketball is an extremely tough inseason sport to design a program for.  Usually multiple games per week.  Some teams train zero  times per week.

    2 – You may want to increase their strength and power but what do the athletes actually need to retain to keep them at present and better levels

    2a – Power – they have a plyo work out at every practice.  Be wise in your exercise choice for socalled “power”

    2b – I would eb more concerned with LBM loss

    2c – I am a firm beleiver in improving when ever possible during the in season.  Some athletes will respond differently than others during the inseason.  Especially from a motivation stand point.  You are correct in your thinking of improving attributes during the season.  For most of us the In Season regardless if the athlete is playing or not is the longest uninterrupted training period on the annual plan.  So we must find ways to improve guys levels of strength and power.  Maintain that long and you detrain.  

    3 – Lower Body strength also is a tough one for BB because the legs can get grinded on if practices are intense and up tempo

    4 – Upper Body you can hit hard

    5 – Remember not to get too carried away with volume and intensity only going one day per week.  I have seen coaches double up the work load b/c of the one day per week routine only to lead to DMOS poor practices and upset coaches.

    6 – Is there a way you may be able to get a BWT circuit day done at home or after practice.  We did this at BSU years ago with the women’s team with great success.  The coaches were on board and the trainer who I had a tremendous relationship with ran the program after practice.

    7 – You may have more than one program.  A player who plays less then 10 minutes a game should be trained differently than a 40 minute a game player.

    8 – In Season regardless of day are usually a 1×3 with corrective/prehab and posterior work.  Ankle prehab is crucial.  Shoulder Complex work also.

    9 – Only you know your athletes and how well they can handle the additional stress of training during the inseason.  Be smart in your choices and I am sure it will work out.

  • #30816

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Coach

     

    On the athlete improvement tracking template,

     

     

    a few questions:

     

     

    1. How do you use the adjusted training max and how do you come to that number

     

    2. Also what is repitition exception,

     

     

    Thanks all the best

     

    Chris

  • #30817

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     1 – the adjusted training max is used as the set point for further training cycles.  That number is determined by a scale we use to estimate 1RM’s.  It should be noted that when we update the athlete’s individual tracking sheet – the number recorded is the actual weight lifted for prescribed reps.  For example, if my 1RM is 500 and my adjusted training max is based on doing 500×3 the athlete’s new training max is 545, 500×1.09.  On his evaluation sheet his score is listed as 500×3.  If the guy does something 3 times he is credited for what he has done not what he may be able to do.  What’s on the bar for reps is real, estimated max’s are good for training biut when we use these numbers as number we compare with other coaches, I have a problem with that.  Don’t tell me a guy cleans 500 when he actually did 315 for 20.  He cleans 315 for 20, which is still impressive even though I will never do that.

     

    2- repetition exception – This is something new and one of the ways we build in evals into our training.  I have developed a set of rules for prilepin’s chart and this part of our developing cycles.   In a 4 week performance cycle week 2 will be what we call a load week and a repetition exception day.  What we do is we set a multiple rep max usually to 10-12 for bench and squats.  Depending on the total body reps we will max to 5.  This is done on the last working set so if we are doing 5×5 at 76% set 5 will be done for max 10-12 reps.  We record this number and it is posted for our guys to compare rep ranking we will see ranges anywhere from 5-15 on these sets and had a guy go 17 last summer.

  • #30818

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Coach,

     

    I know you wrote in your book that you used metabolic circuits during the pre-season program. Is this still the case? and if so could you give us some examples? Thanks.

  • #30819

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     Yes and no!  When there was true training camps with real 2 a days we did and I will post some for you as well as our acclimitazion program for this type of training camp.  We actually started our in season program 2 weeks before 1st game rather then 1 week because of camp changes.

  • #30820

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    We were having a little round table in the office today and were curious what variables you would train in the time you have availble from end of season to combine/pro day testing, assuming the athlete is staying on campus for post season training? Likely a 2-3 month period. A couple of things we were discussing include: Exercise selection (versus exercises done in normal off season) % intensity to train at, break up strength, speed, and position specific training days. Just curious what everyones thoughts were on this subject. Thanks!

  • #30821

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     Number 1 thing we do is:

    Train lower body like a sprinter

    Train upper body like a bodybuilder

    The combine and pro day is a pageant and you are being evaluated on how you look believe me, I have had the pleasure to be at the combine and watch weigh in and height.  They march you out there in your squivvies and you walk across a stage and all the strength coaches are picking your body apart.  You better look the part.

     

    We are a 3 day a week strength program for athletes, we are a 4 day a week program for combine, 2 upper 2 lower.  We have no conditioning days.  Position specific work is condo.  Linear speed. lateral speed, and starts are critical.  Position work is done on Lower days and Speed on Upper days.  We have 2 regeneration days.  If a perfect world for us 225 bench day is Saturday and there is no run.

     

    We train extremely heavy board work on our max effort bench day followed by high rep db presses.  Our goal with heavy board work is to get the athlete handling heavy loads in their hands to make 225 feel light.  Remember your ultimate goal is to increase the athlete 1rm because the higher the 1rm is makes the 225 a lesser percent.  In a 8-12 week period you may not enhance overall from bench but by doing 3-4-5 board work the athlete is handling heavier loads which gives them the fantom confidence that 225 is extremely light.  We use a timed and rep count progression for 225 rep training after a series of band and or chain work.  

     

    We train for speed and explosiveness fro lower body and jumps.  Major Lower body strength work is done with single leg movements.

  • #30810

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Agreed.  As for the endurance aspect, BB to me indicates constant motion, unless setting a pick.  In fact, I make it a point not to play too much ball, as it just eats away at my strength and size.  Hower, being under 6′, my position on the team was always at guard.  So that alters one’s perception slightly.

  • #30814

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    I’ve asked about this a while ago, but I think it would be good to put it on here as well for all to see and discuss.  If one has the ability to train twice a day, placing weight training in the AM with extra workouts in the PM, makes sense in the off season.  And most don’t argue about that.  But what about in season? 

     

    Many will say that weights should always be done after practice or skill work, so as not to interfere with technique.  Even when the sessions are split to AM and PM.  But others propose weights in the AM and practice/speed/skill work in the PM, based on the CNS’s higher capacity later in the day.  Keeping the weight training to the same time of day, year round, is another practiced principle.

     

    What are some of the thoughts of those here on such?  I understand that it’s largely a function of getting in the weight room when you can.  But it’s also a topic that’s bantered about quite a bit.  And if one has the opportunity to help kids/people as much as possible, I think it best to start from an optimal standpoint, and work backwards based on what’s possible.

     

  • #30811

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Wow Joe….The expediency with which you were able to complete the request of just one individual, says a great deal about you.  None of which I didn’t already know, but it needs to be noted none the less.  Thanks for the BB template.

     

  • #30815

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Joe,

    Thanks for taking the time to respond to my question. 

     

    What criteria do you use when determining in-season percentages?  I realize there a lot of variables involved but could you give me some idea as to how you determine what percentages to use when setting up your in-season programs?  Lets assume 2 days per week (upper/lower split with olympic lifts/variations on either day), high school athletes with >2 years training age.

     

    Your site and the content is awesome.  I presented at my state Physical Education conference about designing s&c programs for high school/middle school students yesterday.  I referenced your block zero approach and shared your website address.  Hopefully you might get a few new subscribers to your site.

     

    Thanks

  • #30822

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    If you are a Full Access member I am tracking my youngest son as he begins Block Zero Level I training.  I will do my best to stay on top of it and update quickly when we train.  I am introducing him to the 4 quarter program 1 quarter at a time as I promised him no more then 30 minutes a session to start.  I burned my oldest son out by going to hard to fast when he started.  I still think he remembers!!!

  • #30823

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Any feedback on what you though of the Athletic Position Article would be appreciated.  To make you aware a lot of the material that is new that will be availabe to members will also be inlcuded in the 2nd edition of the Coach’s Strength Training Playbook.

  • #30824

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    I thought the athletic position article was very good.  As a physical education teacher, coach and CSCS I find it very important to communicate to my students and athletes the importance of the athletic position.  The article was easy to understand with a great body segment breakdown of the athletic position.  The video was a great addition for us visual learners.

     

    Great stuff

  • #30825

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Being someone of well-read background, what are your thoughts on the Russian studies and texts, House?  Authors such as Zhelyazkov, Dasheva, Verkhoshansky’s, Issurin’s, and Bondarchuk? 
     

    I know you have your own system of course.  But did you take anything from such practices, and apply it to your training?  Can you elaborate on some of the good and bad things within their practices.

  • #30831

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     Looking for your feedback

    I am trying to look for a way to upload videos that are not available on you tube and is cost effective.  I want to do this so that our members get the first look of the video without it being posted off my youtube site.  After say 6 months I would then but it on the free site.  I have found this site and am trying out the free trial before investing.  I had a hard time embedding the video like our you tube videos but, was able to secure the url.  What do you prefer? Is it ok to have it linked or do you prefer embedded video?   As for me I prefer embedded.  I will continue to see what I am doing wrong on the embedded side.  Feedback is needed thanks.

     

    Sorry go to training videos and look at the test link and let me know what you think of the product.

  • #30832

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Thought the video was good.  Prefer this to you tube.

  • #30833

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Coach,

     

    I enjoyed the video.  I just joined thepowerlifting.com website and noticed that they use motionbox for almost all of their videos.  I’m not too sure if it is free or if there is a fee but I thought I’d mention it to give you another route to go.

  • #30834

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     I will look into that thanks brotha

  • #30804

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Will that cycle be issued for your OTB Block 3 and 4 kids, this winter, as well?  Or will those players follow something closer to what they did this summer, with Rep Maxing at a certain %?

     

    Regarding the OTB SME cycles, were they done in that fashion so as to emphasize the speed strength component of their Effort tier?  Do you have any OTB players that would utilize the F7 effort cycle?  If so, what is the reasoning for having them do so?

     

  • #30835

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     Haven’t forgotten about the board and trying to make it a great communication device.  I have been in a holding pattern the least week as far as whether or not i still have a job.  A lot of what I would have accomplished this past week and half is put on hold as I am in my FOOTBALL HUSTLIN mode.  Football Hustlin is working the shite out of the phones to see what I can get in on.  Should find out in the next 2-3 days if I will be retained.    STAY TUNDED

  • #30836

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    After reading your book, “Athletics Based Strength Training:  The Tier System,” I understand the concept but I have a few questions regarding sets and reps.

     

    I train predominately high school male and female athletes.  How do you determine the sets and reps of each tier?  What are your general guidelines for sets and reps during all the stages? 

     

    Thanks

     

     

  • #30826

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     Have read Bandarchuk and Verkhoshansky.  Have not gotten into Issurin that much.  I like Zatsiorsky myself.  His three methods of stremgth development is the basis of my concurrent sequencing of traits.

  • #30837

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     The standard work sets for Tier System training for HS Athletes are

    Tier 1 – 6 sets plus prep sets

    Tier 2 – 5 sets

    Tier 3 – 4 sets

    Tier 4 – 2 sets

    Tier 5 – 2 sets

     

    In Season

    Tier 1 – 5 sets plus prep sets

    Tier 2 – 4 sets

    Tier 3 – 3 sets

  • #30838

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    How do you use the DB elevator workouts? are the workouts stand alone routines or is it a part of a extra workout after the regular routines?

    How many sets are useful?

  • #30839

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     Elevator work would be an excellent choice as an upper body tier 3 exercise.  When doing it in a Tiered Program I will use a 3 set elevator, Shoulder Press, 45 degree Incline Press, DB Bench Press coupled with some type of pulling variation.  These are usually done with my upper class men.  The more variation and challenge during a work out for them the better.

     

    As for my personal training I will use DB elevators as a Tier 2 Upper Body exercise because I do very little barbell bench presses.  Or it will be a first exercise choice if I am training on a traditional upper lower split

  • #30827

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Good to see you back posting!  I’m sure you’ll keep us up to date on the job.  I might have already missed it somewhere.

     

    With regard to this same area of the country.  I got to thinking about nerves, how they are used in a lift, and how quickly they recover.  Wouldn’t the athlete be better served by doing the same lift, for effort, speed, and volume days?  Thus they are working the same nerves, calling less muscle into play, becoming more “efficient” at the lift as opposed to getting larger, and training with a frequency on par with nervous system recovery? 

     

    The preceding is spurred by the ancient bulgarian powerlifting protocols and other program similarities.

  • #30828

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     I have no issues with a higher level Block Zero and even a  Block I athlete doing the same movements 3x’s per week for various intensities, loading and speed of movement.  That is how I started my son.  My question though is as they get more involved and I am talking about athletes whose goals are not the strength disciplines, they will loss enthusiasm and motivation.  That is why I like the variety of movements,  IT KEEPS THEM ENGAGED.  No science behind that, just plain old truthful evaluation of student athletes.  Plus the athlete’s body need to be more well rounded in movement training then the primary linear competition tested movements of specifically, powerlifitng and weightlifting.

  • #30840

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     Just put up a blog and continuation of Breaking into the field.  For the members in college athletics please send my some things I may have missed.

  • #30841

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    I am having trouble downloading the e-book. It gets to around 50 to 60 percent downloaded then it stops. Does anyone else have this problem?

    Is it possible for Joe or anyone to email me the e-book as an attachment or something.

     

    Thanks

     

    Kent

  • #30842

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    downloaded fine with my older computer.  Try again if still having problems let me know and we will send you a copy

  • #30843

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    It still won’t download properly. Can you please send it to me at kentreddiex@hotmail.com

     

    Thanks

  • #30844

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    I have been using Power 5.1 for about 5 years now since being a student assistant at my university’s athletic department and now with all my individual athletes I workk with.  I’m looking for a good alternative now though because I’ve migrated over to a Mac and Power 5.1 doesn’t want to play nicely with it.  You have any other program recommendations that can accomplish all or at least most of what Power 5.1 does?

     

     

  • #30845

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    D,

     

    I strongly encourage the use of Microsoft Excel when working with athletes and programming needs. With a few tips and tricks, you can make very professional, linkable worksheets that can save you and your staff members a wealth of time. Merging a few boxes, typing in a few formulas and utilizing the microsoft office help online can get you to become an Excel expert in no time.

     

    Also, it’s very compatible with Microsoft and Mac versions.

  • #30846

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    [QUOTE]AFeit wrote

    D,

     

    I strongly encourage the use of Microsoft Excel when working with athletes and programming needs. With a few tips and tricks, you can make very professional, linkable worksheets that can save you and your staff members a wealth of time. Merging a few boxes, typing in a few formulas and utilizing the microsoft office help online can get you to become an Excel expert in no time.

     

    Also, it’s very compatible with Microsoft and Mac versions.

    [/QUOTE]

     

    I appreciate the feedback, but I am absoutely horrible with Excel.  I can’t make things fit on a page, don’t know how to input formulas, etc.  I like 5.1 because it has everything stored for me and I just have to click on an athletes name to pull up their previous workouts/do new ones.  Plus it is simple to add in exercises and just works really well.  I wish they would update it every once in awhile since it is the same product from the early 90’s I believe.

  • #30853

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    I am currently working with 3 athletes, 2 of which are 300lb+ O-line that cannot squat to parallel, and one who has had back surgery and has been advised to not load the spine. I was wondering if you or Coach Feit have any alternative lifts you would incorporate so these guys don’t miss out on the work, but can get more out of their workout besides doing leg press, or squatting high. I have came up with a few ideas such as belt squat, split squats, deadlifting, and some hybrid movements, but was wondering what you have done in this situation. And we are doing hip mobility (hurdle work) on a regular basis. Thanks

  • #30854

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     Man, you don’t need us, looks like you go things covered.  Back Surgery guy – axial loading is the key and you already have mentioned belt squats.  The one thing I would check with is the Medical Staff to see if he will ever be able to front squat.  Back Squats are probably out of the question.  What is their body type, over fat usually leads to poor mobility!

  • #30847

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Buy vmware fusion and install a copy of xp on your mac so you can run Power 5.1 in another window or your mac desktop.

  • #30829

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Thanks House.  Makes sense.  I just find that it’s a bit more difficult to monitor success, when things are always changing from an exercise standpoint.

     

  • #30848

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     I have always been an excel guy from day 1.  I am not even sure I know what Power 5.1 is.  Sorry I am not help on this one.  Good Luck

  • #30855

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     One of our members Chris Sandeen, who by the way was one of out 1st interns at ASU, reviewed my article and added some more info in the top 10 list.  If you have anything else to add to the list please let us know and we will color coat you in.  Chris’ additions are in red.

     

    Thanks for the support

    Coach Kenn

  • #30830

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     Also remember, your foundation and supplemental movements really can stay the same for a long time.  Thats how we all used to do it ans some still do.  You can rotate the major assistance work, the movements you are not going to evaluate.

  • #30849

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    [QUOTE]chexay wrote

    Buy vmware fusion and install a copy of xp on your mac so you can run Power 5.1 in another window or your mac desktop.

    [/QUOTE]

     

    Thats what I’m doing right now, but it has problems with saving or reading my previous data.

     

     [QUOTE]Big House wrote

     I have always been an excel guy from day 1.  I am not even sure I know what Power 5.1 is.  Sorry I am not help on this one.  Good Luck

    [/QUOTE]

     

    You wouldn’t want to post up some basic Excel templates you have used would you? 🙂

  • #30850

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    I have to agree with Coach Feit, I have used Power 5.1 and currently use Excel, and there is no comparison between the two. I would pay off to play around with Excel, but I also had the benefit of Coach Feit help setting up my template.

  • #30856

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Hey Coach,

     

     

    Was wondering what Z, Z1, Z2, Z3 on each of the blocks meant?

     

     

    In Strength

     

     

    Sandeen

  • #30851

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    [QUOTE]johndavis2876 wrote

    I have to agree with Coach Feit, I have used Power 5.1 and currently use Excel, and there is no comparison between the two. I would pay off to play around with Excel, but I also had the benefit of Coach Feit help setting up my template.

    [/QUOTE]

     

    I’m totally fine with using Excel, but I don’t have the time to learn it from scratch.  I know how to do basic formulas and merge cells and thats about it.  Yesterday I spent 2 hours playing around with it trying to get a static template put togther that I can just plug numbers/percentages/exercises in and go and it came out busted and like 6 pages big lol.

  • #30852

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     Work Out Cards on the Professional Portal Programming Icon are Excel Templates

  • #30857

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     At that point in time was creating intensity zones within certain training parameters.  I am revisiting that during my Sabbatical!

  • #30858

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    I have a few questions that I hope you can answer for me regarding your Tier System.  

    1. How do you determine what percentage or rep scheme you use for each cycle,  in regards to your foundational exercises?

    2. How do you determine the % or rep scheme of the supplemental/major assistant exercises?  I read that you use the same rep scheme as the foundation movment.  If it is Tier 2 or 3 (in a 3×5 program) and I am doing 5-4 sets, do I increase the weight each set?  Keeping the reps the exact same?

     

     

    Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions in advance

  • #30859

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     Sorry for the delay, I was out of town at the combine.

     

    These are great questions that 10 years ago would have been very easy for me to answer.  Why? because I didn’t know as much and my cycling was very traditional and was not a strong believer in Prilipen’s chart a the time.

     

    1 – This is a coaches choice.  This is where I think too many people get what the tier system is truly all about.  The tier system is based on a structured rotation of exercises based on movement categories [3] and prioritizing those 3 to make sure they lead off one of the 3 main training sessions of the week.  Based on with category leads off the session the exercise/movement order is then determined. From there we built in some cycling rules and exercise choice structure to help the program designer get a feel for what the design should look like.  Cycling is truly based on what the goals for each training phase may be.  I determine the cycles now based on Prilipen’s chart and volumes are based on level of athlete in our program.  I do have certain rules/guidelines that I have established for Prilipen’s chart that are not available at this time to members as I am outlining that chapter of my new playbook.  Also the cycle is determined based on what response I am trying to illciit, maximal strength, sub maximal strength, dynamic effort, repetitive effort.

     

    2 – In regards to tiers and cycling this is how it started based on traditional methods.  Most of the cycles were developed off of manipulating the estimated repetition max charts.  If the Tier One foundation movements was 6 working sets of 3 reps at 80 percent, the Tier 2 would be probably 10% and one working set less for the same reps = 5×3 at 70%. Tier 3 would be 15% and 2 sets less than Tier 1 = 4×3 65%.  Even with Prilipen’s Chart I still use a similar % reduction on Tiers 2 and 3 certain levels of training where the movements are similar and we are training on more of a traditional model rather than a concurrent sequencing model.  I used the same rep scheme back them because tiers 1-3 for a movement category followed a heavy moderate light cycle.  Now I also use different reps schemes based on intent.  It’s is your choice whether you use ascending, descending, or stable loads.

     

    I hope this is what you are looking for.  I am a big believer in giving you enough to understand but allowing you to be creative in your decision making process

     

  • #30862

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    I just finshed reading Athletic based training and have a few questions:

     

     

    1.       Can you explain why you like daily undulating periodization versus weekly undulating periodization in the Elite model?   Do you have any concerns about mixing energy system development within a single workout?
    2.    Why put power zone development prior to the main session?
    3.    Can you talk about the reasoning behind the large number of warm up sets?  What type of recovery time do you aim for in between warm up sets?
    4.       What do you mean in the same above chart by ?1t5? in warm-ups?
    5.       Why put posterior chain after the main session? Why only do high volume?
    6.       When you do auxiliary programs after the main session, do you typically just do one program?
    7.       Especially for a volleyball program, what are your thoughts on plyometrics? The only mention I see is auxiliary program 78 and 89. Are you recommending doing plyometrics after the main session like all the other auxiliary programs?
    Thanks for your help–I enjoyed the book.
  • #30863

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     I just answered these and lost the thread I am upset!  not your problem just had to get that off my chest because this is the second time it has happened to me.  You are putting me to the test, great questions.  Remember, I reserve the right to be wrong.

    1a – Personal preference.  I like to use the term concurrent sequencing when speaking about our rotation.  Based on my studies and practical application of this program, this works best for us when using this specific training model.

    1b – No, most athletic activities utilize more than one energy system although one is the priority.  We raise, retain, maintain traits in our program.

    2 – Most athletes will not give the proper effort or attitude to these movements when they are done at the end of a session

    3 - I don’t see 4 warm up which I now call prep sets as a lot.  This is primarily for Tier 1 exercises only.  It is a great time for athletes to focus on technique principles before attacking work sets.

    4 – 1t5= 1 to 5 reps

    5a – Posterior Chain/Shoulder is a stand alone because of it’s importance to athletes.  It is done after the main session because I prefer to have all the “big” movements and uni lateral movements done before hand.  It helps in our structure and integrity of our plan 

    5b – High Volume because our lower volume work comes through our tiers 1-5 work

    6 – Yes, if done after the main session.  If done as a stand alone, we give a 30 minute max for a session.  We usually start with power zone and get 2 aux programs in

    7 – Volleyball depending on athlete/team can be a year round sport.  I would be cautious when implementing plyo’s into a program when your athlete could be practicing and competing year round.  Their sport is plyometric.  We do plyo’s before the main session with younger athletes and substitute total body movements with in the tiers with advanced athletes.

     

    Hope this helps thanks for the support.

    COACH KENN

  • #30869

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Coach Kenn and other Coaches who use the tier system to train athletes,

     

    When performing speed work ( i.e. multidirectional, linear, quickness drills) during a 3×5 tier week do you find that it is more beneficial to your athletes to do the work on the same day as strength work or on a non-traditional strength day? If you do speed work on the same day do you like to perform the speed work as a separate training exposure, i.e. early morning, and then perform strength work later mid day or do you like to do the speed work just prior to strength work ? I see benefits to both ( pre-weights or different exposure), and I also realize  a lot depends on certain aspects that are specific to your team goals and the athletic team that is being trained. 

     

    Thanks for your time. 

     

     

  • #30870

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     My opinion

    Depending on the time of the annual plan and the need for the level of conditioning I have done it on Tues/Thurs with success.  Remember that is 5 so called neural days in a row, be smart with your overall volumes. Depending on the situation that works best for you, I don’t think that is a big deal.  I prefer to go back to back so my guys don’t have to come back as they most likely will have PRP’s to deal with several times a week.  I can tell you that when we go back to back on session T days our cleans are on point! As long as “SPEED” work is not done after a tier session I think any scenario would be successful.  I also like going back to back because I don’t get carried away with bells and whistle drills and too long a duration/volume for this type of work.

     

    COACH KENN

  • #30871

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Joe,

    I am in the process of reading through your E-Book The Coaches Strength Training Playbook.  Would it be beneficial to purchase  your DVD?  Would it fill in some of the questions that I have? 

     

    I plan on attending the Villanova Strength and Conditiong Clinic at the end of April.  I would love to be able to sit down with you and ask you a few questions regarding your Tier System.

     

    Just when I think the content on your website could not get any better it does.

     

    Thanks

  • #30872

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     The DVD was designed to be an add on to the book.  There is some material in there that would benefit anyone interested in the Tier System.  However, i have developed a better approach to my long term athlete development plan and would consider the larger variety of exercise described in the DVD as advanced training based on conjugated rotation of effort exercises.  I am dining and dashing at Villanova.  I was supposed to speak Friday night and stay through Saturday but, my son was invited to the ELITE 11 Regional QB Camp at Ohio State on April the 30th.  Dad isn’t going to miss that!  So I am flying out Saturday morning and leaving Saturday evening.  Hopefully will will have time to speak.

     

    Coach Kenn

  • #30873

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    I teach Middle School Physical Education and was wondering what specific suggestions you might have to implement the Block Zero program with my Middle School students?

     

    I have looked over the Block Zero for newcomers manual and just read the Block Zero implementation sheet.  Great stuff.

     

    Thanks

  • #30874

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     Magnello

    I am not sure if you are a full access member. If you are I have a video series of QTs 1, 3, 4 for Block Zero on the Parent Portal.

  • #30864

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Coach Kenn:

     

    Thank you for your response–very helpfull.  One follow up question for you.  Since Posterior Chain/Shoulder is so important to athletes, why wouldn’t you want to also develop in a power or hypertrophy phase?

  • #30882

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Coach,

     

    I was first introduced to you and the Tier System while I was interning under Mark Philippi and I really enjoy reading/listening to your insight.  I noticed on some of the programs you were implementing a Modified Max Effort.  I really liked the idea of having the Max Effort method modified, because as you already know, some kids aren’t ready for true Max Effort work.  So while I was thinking of ways to implement this idea towards Primary/Core lifts, I was wondering what your opinion was to using Jim Wendler’s 5/3/1 protocol as their Modified Max Effort work. 

     

    Also, I was wondering if you have found any percentage/rep scheme that you’ve found to be most effective.

     

    Thanks,

     

    Chris Tolzman

  • #30865

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     I am losing you a little, please give me some examples of your pc chain exercises and your rep or tempo scheme for hypertrophy.  In basic periodization 10-12 reps is hypertrophy, which is what we generally use for these movements.  The rotator cuff muscles are small and tend to do better with higher reps.  Explain to me how you want to develop power of the rotator cuff.  If it sounds logical, I will try it out and if it works give you credit when I put it in my programs.  We do dynamic effort squats and hang clean and resistive jumping for total and lower body “power”.

     

    Thanks for making me think

    Coach Kenn

  • #30866

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Coach Kenn:

     

    I agree about the rotator cuff muscles, but what about pc exercises for glutes and hamstrings?  For instance, the eccentric and concentric leg curl you are highlighting, or weighted foot or shoulder elevated glute bridges?

  • #30867

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    I may be off but I look at it as Mike Boyle says “Tools in your Toolbox.”  Of course, there are many ways to train the posterior chain (Straight Leg Hip Extension, Bent-Leg Hip Extension, Box Squats, etc.) but when we look at developing a powerful posterior chain, the time tested exercises are DE Box Squats/Squats, Jump Variations, and Oly Lifts.  The DE/Power part of the equations is met through the Core-Supplemental lifts performed in a Dynamic Effort fashion or as Coach would say Maximal Concentric Acceleration but the bonus is extra volume training on the posterior chain at the end of the workout.

  • #30868

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     As far as the bodyweight leg curls, you have to start low reps because most can’t do them and progress,  I stay around sets of six for eccentric only and with the exception of my son have had very few athletes do multiple sets and I like TOLZMAN’s answer.

  • #30883

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     Long before 5/3/1 came out I wrote this article for ELITEFTS in 2005 https://www.bighousepower.com/LinkClick.aspx?fileticket=ZbT/VOs3TPg%3d&tabid=71, see anything similar?  I love Jim and I am happy for his 5/3/1 success but, I was doing 5/3/1before 5/3/1.  So obviously I like it.  I actually do a different version of Modified Max Effort that I will be discussing shortly.  I have a slightly different scheme I am using now for progressions that and going to create a mini ebook for my members.  I manipulated a scheme I read from one of Coach Philippi’s newsletters

    Thanks for the support

    Coach Kenn

  • #30884

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Coach,

     

    Would you still recommend all athletes perform a GPP program for 6-14 weeks prior to performing any Max Effort/Dynamic Effort work? I’ve been looking at both General Conditioning and Strength Endurance training schemes and I was wondering what your thoughts were to using High Volume Ranges from Prilepins Chart during the GPP program, practically like an accumulation program.  Thanks for all your insight.

     

    Thanks,
     

    Chris Tolzman

  • #30885

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     I have come to a lot of conclusions when training athletes and the biggest one is this, any training program will have a benefit to great athletes so I am very deliberate now in my long term athlete development.  My Block Zero and Block I athletes are not even introduced to dynamic effort et al until Block II.  You bring up prilipen’s chart haha, another mini e-book I will be doing in the future that I know will be a hit.  I have created rules for each level of athlete in my block system that give you, the program designer, several logical choices when developing plans and yes, it is based on the high optimal low volumes that are associated with the chart.

     

    Coach Kenn

     

  • #30886

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    When do you anticipate the e-books will be available?

  • #30914

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     Felt like I needed to start a new thread to keep you in the loop of what I am up to based on Magnello’s question of when we may expect these e-books.

     

    I have found that I do have more time to write being on a coaching hiatus but, it still amazes me how much these internet guru’s put stuff out.  I always asked who are you training if you can put stuff out there everyday.  I am training several people including my own son’s and still have hard time getting out a weekly blog!  My rant but had to say that.

     

    My first project as an E-Book is the one I have wanted to get done for some time, “PUSH, JUMP, PUNCH”  Teaching Athletes to Clean” needs to be completed.  I am shooting all the tech pictures needed today for this LTAD process of a practical and systematic way to ensure solid form on this movements for athletes whose number #1 priority is not lifting weights!

     

    I have the notes ready for the next 2 projects

     

    The first one will most likely be Preparation Progressions for the “BIG LIFTS”.  This will be a brief hit on a cycling format to be used a prep sets for athletes who will perform multiple working sets at a stable load or progression for athletes using ascending sets cycles reaching on top set.  I will also add in basic mobility/prehab/corrective movements we have worked  into the prep sets to add that need to the program as well as to add density to the program

     

    Prilipen’s Chart 

    This will be a hope a solid read as when I complete this e-book I want it to be written in a way that all I have to do is paste in in as a chapter to my second edition of the Coaches Strength Training Playbook.  I will discuss the rules I have developed and how to manipulate the chart and show cycle examples for each.  We utilized these rules in the summer of 2009 with tremendous success in every level. The improvements were so profound I declared that summer the best I have had in 20 years of coaching.  See where that got me, out of a job!  Remember we need PLAYA’s!!!!!!!!

     

    PEACE

    COACH KENN

  • #30915

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Coach,

     

    I was wondering what your thoughts were to tumbling and its implication towards proprioception.  I have a good friend who is a volunteer coach at Wake Forest and Coach Ethan Reeve utilizes tumbling during this Dynamic Warm-Up.  He mentioned athletes performing tumbling to bear crawls and tumbling into crab walks.  I can see the benefits for tumbling being untilized in Block Zero but at times I want to think that the risk out weigh the benefit.  Also, I’m not sure if you saw on EliteFTS but a great web link to Polish Weightliftin Methods was posted.  I beleive they show some of the tumbling they do in Part 2: https://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=308D0F3E52764BA9

  • #30875

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    I am a full access member.  The videos helped.  Would you recommend implementing Block Zero the way you implemented it with your incoming freshman?

     

    Thanks

  • #30876

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     The Info offered on the site is based on a more generic model compared to what we did at Louisville.  You could do the ASU plan.   I would do more of what I did on the videos and the level I card.  My son is a middle school age athlete, he will be 13 this week.  Very shortly he will begin to have a bar in his hand.

  • #30877

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Coach I was going over your Block 0 handout/presentation. I was noticing that you had the Max Jones Quadrathon within the testing protocol. What gave you the idea to use this, and also I googled this and got a dissertation from UPitt PHD student. IT had listed the long jump, the 3 long jumps, 30meter sprint and a Overhead Medball/shotput throw….

     

     

    do you do any variations of this for your testing or do you strictly stick to these parameters…..ie thirty meters?

     

     

     

    Thanks

     

    CS

  • #30916

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     YOU ARE RIGHT ON POINT!  I am going to work in some tumbling drills and at the end of my presentations, that is one of the points I say I am going to address in the future.  As a former Deacon, I always follow what the S/C coaches do there and I believe Coach Reeve’s successful background in wrestling has tremendous merit in terms of the tumbling sequences he uses for all athletes.  Definite Words Win!

  • #30917

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    I think the tumbling would be extremely beneficial for all athletes, but I was reading an interview with Coach Reeve and he had also mentioned “Get Ups” which would really work well into your athletic position quarter.  Basically Coach Reeve puts each athlete in various “Bad Positions” and the athlete has to get into an athletic position as fast as he can.  The bad positions are 1) back, 2) belly, 3) side, 4) butt, 5) hands and knees, and 6) knees.  I think this could also be utilized with those newer athletes in Block Zero as well.

     

    I noticed in your interview with Mike Robertson, you had mentioned that you had a goal to coach in NC again.  I was wondering what town you grew up in, I grew up in Rural Hall, NC which is like 10-15 minutes from Winston.  NC would really benefit if you ever return to coach in the great state of North Carolina.

  • #30878

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     I have been doing the MAX JONES QUADRATHLON since I first discovered it while working with track and field at BOISE STATE.  It was used to evaluate power output in throwers.  Obviously when you look at it it is a great and simple tool to implement with any strength/power athlete.  I utilize the 10 and 40 yard dash instead of 30 meters.

  • #30879

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    [QUOTE]magnello wrote
     

    I teach Middle School Physical Education and was wondering what specific suggestions you might have to implement the Block Zero program with my Middle School students?

     

    I have looked over the Block Zero for newcomers manual and just read the Block Zero implementation sheet.  Great stuff.

     

    Thanks

    [/QUOTE]

     

    I teach Frosh Phys Ed and followed House’s advice=”absorb, modify and apply”-I use my own version of block 0 as part of a general warm-up no less than three times a week.  I broke what I wanted to do based on available space and taught it over three days and now the kids have it down pat.

  • #30880

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    coach mika

    I am interested to learn how you use block zero in your general warmup.

  • #30918

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    For anyone who is interested, I was browsing another forum and came upon a program that is similar to Dartfish.  Although you can’t superimpose videos on one another, there are features that are really nice to use to break down technical defencies during lifts or reveiw body position.

     

    https://www.kinovea.org/en/

     

    Chris Tolzman

  • #30922

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Coach, I read your post on the posterior chain. If possible, I would like to learn more about how you use the tier system. I can be reached at NewDLCoach@aol.com

     

    Thanks

  • #30919

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     will check this out

  • #30881

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Megnello…sorry for the delay….Testing athletes the last couple of weeks kept me busy.

     

    Heres how I set it up.  We have teambuilding and fitness concepts unit first unit every semester for freshman.  Our freshman split the year between health and PE.

     

    As part of the unit, we cover stength and I teach movement preparation.  I teach the basics of the athletic position ala Coach Kenn and actually work backwards.  I explain to the kids that adoclescence and lack of physical activity has limited their ability to get into the propoer position and we have a series of “yoga” poses as relative strength exercises.  The routine is as follows:

     

      STUNT EMPHASIS  COACHING POINTS
    1 PLANK Extension throught the posterior chain, body alignment and a nutral spine Chin off chest, focus spot on floor, bring the floor together by squeezing forearms toward each other, pull stomach thu back and flex glutes
    2 PUSH PLANK Extension throught the posterior chain, body alignment and a nutral spine. ACTIVATION of Muscles surrounding the shoulder girdle Chin off chest, focus spot on floor, bring the floor together by squeezing hands down and in toward each other, pull stomach thu back and flex glutes
    3 HI HOLD/Push Up Start Hold Extension throught the posterior chain, body alignment and a nutral spine. ACTIVATION of Muscles surrounding the shoulder girdle Chin off chest, focuse spot on floor, bring the floor together by squeezing hands down and in toward each other, pull stomach thu back and flex glutes
    4 PUSH PLANK Extension throught the posterior chain, body alignment and a nutral spine. ACTIVATION of Muscles surrounding the shoulder girdle
  • #30923

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    House,

     We are in the process of making a signee training manual and were looking to put in some blitz package stuff for kids looking to get some extra work or something we can throw in at the end of a workout. Do you plan on putting any sample of what your blitz package stuff looked like? I was looking through the SC Playbook and found a few things in the back appendicies, but wasn’t sure if they were technically Blitz Packages or not. Thanks

  • #30924

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     At the end of the ebook version are actual blitz programs we used at ASU, Utah and established at BSU.  There would not be much difference.  I would say based on what I know now, i would concentrate on power zone, pilates/mobility, posterior shoulder as general concepts  

     

    WORDS WIN

    Coach Kenn

  • #30920

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     can the kinovea measure velocity or displacemnt? I came across this program a couple of years ago and I believe at that time it did have those features but that was two years ago. Thanks

  • #30921

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Saverio,

     

    I don’t think there is any feature on this program that will measure velocity or displacement.  You could use the timer feature, know the distance of the bar par, distance ran, etc. and find the velocity that way.  But I have not seen any feature on the program since I’ve been using it. 

  • #30928

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    I am interested in purchasing the Power Factor Computer for my business. I am not able to afford the more expensive and probably better power evaluators. I am interested to hear your thoughts on the Power Factor Computer. Would you recommend it?

    I thought it would be a good investment to teach my athletes as they perform the olympic lifts and on on dynamic effort exercises. I coach them to move the bar fast and visually watch and monitor but I thought that purchasing the power factor would be good.

     

  • #30930

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    I came across this article by Joe Defranco and he stance on olympic lifts vs weighted jumps.  It was also posted on Joseph Potts page on Strength Performance Network.  I am curious to hear your thoughts on Joe’s belief that olympic lifts are not necessary for any athlete.

     

    I train mostly high school athletes with relatively low training age.  I introduce the athletes to clean variations in the beginning and progress from there based upon grasp of variations and if they continue to train. 

     

    http://www.defrancostraining.com/ask-joe-test/41-strength-training/180-hang-cleans-vs-weighted-jumps-for-explosive-hip-extension.html

  • #30929

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     Hopefully someone else can help you.  I have never heard of POWER FACTOR COMPUTER  _ can you shed some light on this.  Please remember before tendo’s et al,  The Coach’s eye was the evaluator.  I am a fan of tendo units but began to utilize them less and less, especially with my younger athletes.  

  • #30931

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     WHy not use both?  - The more tools in the tool box.  I am not promoting the OL’s but, I have found there is some merit in having an athlete learn the deck clean and it’s pulling variations.  If your athletes are young in Training Age, remember get them stronger and they will get more explosive.  I do agree a full blown OL program is not needed but there is merit in developing total body strength through them if taught properly and performed with a high level of technical efficiency.  I utilize weighted jumps as a alternative to OL’s pulls during Blocks 3 and 4 of my training plans for athletes.

     

    On a side note, I am tired of hearing the OL are too hard to teach.  We have them for 3-5 years.  Embrace the process of development.  Are we not teachers?  SO TEACH!

     

    WORDS WIN
    COACH KENN

  • #30932

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    I totaly agree.  I teach my athletes (regardless of training age) OL and their variations.  I also use weighted jumps. 

  • #30933

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     

  • #30934

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    I agree with Coach.  We as coaches must utilize every training method, including Weighted Jumps, Plyos, Med Ball Work and Oly Lifts.  In Joe’s defense, the private setting is another animal.  You’ll have kids come in once a week who’ve already forgotten what a Hang Jump Shrug is.  Also, these kids will work with you for X amount of sessions and you’ll “hopefully” see them next summer.  Tough stuff….

  • #30935

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     I understand the private sector and you are right you may the one and done’s.  On the other hand I know Joe does a tremendous job in retention of his athletes.  Once you find the ones that are committed I would start building the progressions.  I do believe Joe does a lot of deadlifts and trap bar deadlifts.  That is a key component in my teaching progressions for the deck clean

  • #30936

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Coach, we’re in total agreement.  If you have the opportunity to have an athlete for an extended period of time, a progression towards learning the technical aspects of the lifts would be very beneficial.

  • #30887

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     Coach Kenn - 

     

    I read your article on the 5-3-1 “modified ME”  I understand you take a percentage to use  a max for each exercise you used to train the squat/bench during each wave.  My question is what is the percentage range for each exercise you used?  Is that the range of weight you used, because I assumed (my first mistake) that you used the percentage based on the 5-3-1 wave that you listed.    

  • #30888

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     The weekly percentages are based off of athletes true 1rm for that exercise or a training max based on percentage load compared to back squat or bench press

  • #30889

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     My next question is how did you come up with your range for each given “assistance lift” for the squat?

     

     

    Data Collection of Lower Body Rotation (copied form Joe Kenn’s article “Maximum Effort Training for the Front Seven) 

     

    Stage 1 ? Front Squat 

    Percentage of Back Squat Max   76.7% 

    Range       60.2% – 91.1% 

     

    Stage 2 ? Safety Bar Box Squat to Parallel Box 

    Percentage of Back Squat Max   83.4% 

    Range       71.4% – 97.3% 

     

    Stage 3 ? Cambered Bar Box Squat to Parallel Box 

    Percentage of Back Squat Max   76% 

    Range       65.1% – 90.1% 

     

    Stage 4 ? Buffalo Bar Box Squat to Parallel Box 

    Percentage of Back Squat Max   94.3% 

    Range       85.8% – 104.9%

     

    My reason for asking is because not all athletes will have a true 1rm for each exercise.  I myself (say I’m using the front squat) take a percentage of the back squat and use that as an estimated front squat max. I then apply a percent load to each set for the given reps to train the front squat.  I am curious to the range concept and is this range you stay within for each given assistance exercise for the squat or bench?  

     

  • #30890

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     The range was actual data taken from the athletes who participated in the program.  For example if the range is 85.8 – 104.9 then we had an athlete whose max on that lift was 85.8% of his back squat and we had one that was 104.9% of his back squat.  Everyone else fell in between.  The Percentage of Back Squat max was the average.  So if I was taking a athlete entering the max effort rotation program for the first time and I had to establish training max’s for him I would take his back squat max and convert it using Percentage of Back Squat max number that correlates to movement I am using.

     

    Hope this helps

    COACH KENN

  • #30946

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Coach,

               I am new to your site but I have to say I have really glad that I joined.    I am a High School baseball coach and my questions are about the subject of baseball.  I would like your opinion on exercise selection.  What exercises would you recommend or more importantly stay away from?  I am looking for the kids to gain strength and perhaps a little size.  I want to increase their strength but not lose their flexibility and range of motion.   Each sport trains differently to achieve different outcomes, some train for endurance, some for power, others for speed, I understand what I would like is an expert opinion.

    Thanks

    Benji Winkelman

     

  • #30947

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     If you follow me then you realize I will look at things different than most.

    Baseball – be very aware that one of the risk reward areas of concern to me is the hands and wrists, especially pitchers.  With that being said I would not write in a full clean into the workout.  I would power pull them like crazy.  I would prefer front squats with them but may have them use straps especially pitches again i do not want there wrist in compromising positions.  You may say why not back squat? Now I will talk about shoulders, Back squats over time when used frequently put stress on the external rotators of the shoulders?  Racked DB Squats, SPlit Squats, Safety Bar Squat would be ideal if I were training a BB TEam.  Lunge Matrix, Cuff Complexes, Mostly all my upper body work would be DB’s with maybe just for fielders some barbell benching in some cycles just bc they will do it anyway on their own.  Extension, FLexion of the elbow as well as forearm and wrist work.  Huge relative strength circuits, no much over head work with the exception of some med ball throws.

     

    I am Rambling but hopefully this gives you some food for thought

     

    WORDS WIN
    Coach Kenn “Big House”

  • #30948

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Is it vital to continue to do the posterior chain, neck movements, and shoulder girdle exercises during in-season?

  • #30950

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Coach Kenn; One thing we all emphaise as strength coaches is nutritutiion and recovery. What do you think about what should be included in the pre-game meal which will take place approx. 3 hours before game time, and what type of a post game workout would you suggest the next day less than 15 hours after a “maximal” performance. I also think the nutritution for the “pre game” meal really starts on Thursday fpr h.s. players because Thur. are really polish days.

  • #30952

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    I am looking to expand my business by providinig my services to a few local Division III colleges in my area.  They currently do not have a S&C coach and do not have any formal S&C programs.  I was curious to know what you think would be a fair price point for providing S&C services to individual teams.  I was thinking about providing consultations, creation of S&C programs (w/out direct involvement) and creation and implementation of S&C programs (direct involvement at least 3-4 times per week).

     

    I look forward to hearing anyone’s opinion.  Thanks in advance

  • #30949

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     YES!!!!!!!  These vital safety areas of an athlete during the season and must be continued.  Roondogs and face pulls are great in season with some cuff complex work, Rdl’s and reverse hypers are great in season

  • #30951

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     Prep Game meals are an interesting meal to speak about because most colleges will have this meal catered in.  Everywhere I have been it’s the same, Chicken breast, some type of pasta/lasagna, green vegetables, baked potatoes, and a deli bar.  Whether it’s right or wrong that is what it is and then there are they guys who skip the meal altogether.  I will differ all nutrition answers to those who are nutritionist and although there are probably some specific options that should be available on pre game meal I believe it is the weekly diet and hydration plan that is the key to success  Probably not the answer you were looking for sorry.

     

    I have done it all ways in the weight room the day after a game.  I would go with a circuit type work for my players, train the guys who didn’t get much time hard.  running would be some type of stride tempo work for around 1000-1200 yards and reduce as season prolongs

  • #30953

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Looking at a similar product line.  I think price would be directly related to how much they want from you and what experience[s] you have had coaching on the college level.  This has been tricky for me because I don’t want to scare them off.  Div III Budgets at most schools have small athletic budgets.  That is why you see very few with strength coaches.

  • #30958

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Coach,

     

    I was wondering what you look for when you design a PAP for a certain block of training.  Are there certain PAP criteria that needs to be met for each day or block?  Although, I have been using the components of Parisi’s Dynamic Warm-Up Method, Chris Doyle’s Dynamic Warm-Up for All Sports, and Magnificent Mobility to name a few, I was thinking about how efficient your various PAP look. 

     

    Also from a standpoint of volume, I think using certain exercises as PAP can be advantageous for those who need more volume in certain areas.  Obviously, I would rather not make the warm-up so extensive that it effects their iron work but I would like to ensure that their bodies are prepared for the upcoming work in their strength training. 

     

    Sorry for the long post.  As you can already tell, I can get too caught up in the “paralysis by analysis.”

  • #30959

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     Sorry for the delay just answered on OPEN FORUM

  • #30964

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    I am looking for information about the use of supplements.  I am a baseball coach and some of my players are asking me about using supplements in the off season during their training sessions.  I am unsure how to guide them in this aspect of training.  Should they be taking supplements?  If so which ones are safe and what should they stay away from.  Any insights you have would be greatly appreciated.

    Benji

  • #30965

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     Benji

    What age brackets?

    1st I will tell you the number one supplement in the world is HARD WORK.

    2nd the next best supplement is a great breakfast with real food – not pop tarts or donuts

    3rd the next best supplement is sleep and recovery.

    4th the next best supplement is calories – this is where it may be a general ready to drink formula as simple as chocolate milk post work out.

     

    Send me more info on age and I will refer this to our on site nutritionist Adam Fiet

     

    WORDS WIN
    COACH KENN

  • #30966

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Thank you for responding.  Their are 2 boys, 18 years old.  I have also had other students aproach me,  they are senior boys in high school, looking for input on supplements to take to get bigger.  Everyone wants to be bigger!!  Ironically I have stated to them just about exactly what you stated in your response to me.  I cannot stop them from taking protein powders, etc.  but I do want to help them make correct informed choices in life.  I also want to be able to have information that I can pass along to parents who will be asking me about my opinion on this subject.

    Thanks again for responding, sorry about the vagueness of my question

    Benji

  • #30967

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Thanks for responding to my vague question.  Their are 2 boys that are 18 years old.  In good shape and are 2 of our better athletes.  they are looking to get bigger for a college to notice them.  I have also had other senior boys approach me on the subject.  Ironically I have stated to them just about exactly what you stated in your reply.  I cannot stop the from taking protien powers, etc.  but I do what to help them make good informed choices in their life.  I am also forseeing parent phone calls in the future and I want to be able to give them correct information when they ask my opinion on the subject.

    Thanks again, I am loving the web site!

    Benji

  • #30954

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    I am a full-time strength coach at a DIII school in the PNW. Just to throw some numbers out there… I get paid about 42K/year, and I have a budget for my weight room of 45K. However, I also coach track & field and teach PE for my University. Here is what most DIII’s have to deal with:

    1) 9 months of indiscretionary time where is is actually an NCAA violation to run a specific sports workout exclusively for one team in the off-season… and you better not track it.
    2) There weight rooms are shared with the general student population 90% of the time… that makes for a lot of standing around and waiting for people to stop curling in the power rack.
    3) Unless there is an AD in place that understands what you are doing it will be tough to get the equipment you need to have these athletes complete your program.
    4) Well intentioned, but reactive sport coaches that want you to get their players faster mid-season when they should have been working on things over the summer.
    5) If you are just going to provide the programming… A lot will get lost in translation. Who is going to implement your program?

    Goodluck,

    CW

  • #30969

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Coach Kenn-

     

    Do you have plans of adding more exercise demos on the member site? I am looking through some of this Block Zero Program and wondering what some of the movements look like. I have done some research on Youtube and SPN, and usually it is a terminology thing, but hoping you might expand on the “Exercise Technique” tab of the website.

     

    Thanks for the great info… Big fan of you philosophy,

     

    Chris Wood

  • #30970

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     Chris

    Thanks for the support.  I am not sure if you are a full access member, but we have a full presentation and demos of block zero movements on the parent portal.  If you feel we need to add demos to exercise tech tab, then we will.  Send us your requests and we will film some footage.  My son will be training this Sunday at the facility so we should be able to get somethings on tape and on the site.

    WORDS WIN

    COACH KENN

  • #30971

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Coach Kenn-

    Just joined up on the professional portal about two weeks ago. I am slowly catching up on the content. If it is not too much trouble to put some of the block zero movements up on the site then by all means go for it. I think it may help with catching members up on terminology. In the previous post on this topic I mentioned that it may just be a terminology thing, but getting everyone on the same page with the proper exercise names would be very helpful. Each Head Coach kind of carries their own bag of tool around, and while the tools tend to be very similar, what is a claw hammer in one setting may go by another name elsewhere.

    Thanks for all you,

    Chris Wood
    Pacific Lutheran University

  • #30955

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     Woodcd,

     

    I am familiar with your University and it is a mere shadow of it’s former self athletically.  You are correct, it starts with the AD, but the head coaches have to be on board.  They used to be in the late 80’s early  to mid 90’s and then the wheels fell off the cart.  It is hard to watch as an alum.  Best of luck in your uphill battle.

  • #30956

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     Dalpapa-

     

    I am curious to hear what you know and your opinions of what is currently going on. Would you mind contacting me at my e-mail at the University?

  • #30957

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     Dalpapa-

     

    I am curious to hear what you know and your opinions of what is currently going on. Would you mind contacting me at my e-mail at the University?

  • #30998

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Coach,

     

    I hope all is well and business is booming.  It’s only a matter of time before your sessions are filled. 

     

    I was looking over your sample annual plan you have available in the Professional Portal and I noticed during the Spring II Summer Program you have listed “Speed Ret” and “4 QT Speed Ret.”  I was wondering if you could go into further detail about how you were setting up those sessions.  Also, what books/DVDs do you recommend on speed and agility?  Mark Philippi suggested the Doyle DVDs made available through Championship Products but I’d like to know what you’d recommend.

     

    By the way, I started using Sumo Supinated Row and I see why that is the first progression to Barbell Rowing. I believe you said the progression was Sumo Supinated to Regular BB Row to finally Pendlay Row.  Also, the RDL to Shrug has been really helping me find my Second pull for the clean.

     

    Thanks, 

     

    Tolzman 

     

     

  • #30999

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     Let me review my summer notes before getting back to you on speed retention in detail – I can tell you we call it speed retention because I do not focus on linear speed development as much during the summer as we do in the winter when conditioning is second.  

     

    I am a Martin Rooney fan so I like his running information and I am a huge fan of Chris’  There is an older book by Doc Kries and Frank Costello called sports agility that I like

     

    Progression

    Sumo Supinated Row

    Barbell Prontated Row from RDL Mid Point Position

    Pendlay Row

    Pure Dead Stop Row with reset

  • #30891

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     Hey Coach,

     

    What if we don’t have the certain bars for the progressions? We only the regular bars.  How would you modify?

     

    Coach Menefee

     

  • #31001

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Questions asked referring to collegiate athletes:

     

    1.) Some of your templates have a T-U-L split instead of the “traditional’ T-L-U split. Why is this? Is this due to the academic calendar, discretionary time etc. ?

     

    2.) Do you use lifting straps for your athletes at any time for any type of pull or clean?

     

    Comments from other coach?s are appreciated as well.

     

    Thank you for your time.

     

     

  • #30892

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Coach Menefee,

     

    I too had only access to regular bars but I rotated movments like front squat, front box squat, back squat, and box squat. If you have the necessary equipment, you could always introduce the athletes to modified max effort movements with chains to introduce them to accomodating resistance.  Or you could use a reverse band method, by finding what weight to use with appropriate band tension.  My suggestion is use your rational imagination and try things out.  I saw alot of gains by using straight weight and rotating classic exercises and their variations. 

     

    Also varying the box height for the athletes will give you more exercise variation to choose from.

     

    Hope I helped.

     

    Tolzman

  • #31000

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Coach,

     

    If possible could you also post a winter speed training program where speed development is emphasized more.  I remember you mentioning how you liked contrast method with your athletes but I really wanted to get to see how you structured the session.  Like you said before, if you can’t plan, you can’t do anything.

     

    Thanks Coach!

     

    Happy New Year!

  • #31005

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    I was curious to know approximately how much time I should spend teaching the athletic position?  When is the most appropriate time to make the transition into squat technique.  I coach football at the high school level and our head coach would like to start our winter program next week.  I am fresh out of grad school with a masters in sports conditioning and perfomance, and was asked to redesign the strength program.  I have decided to use the tier system.  I love the philosophy!  One of the best things about Coach Kenn is how much emphasis he places on technique.  I love that!  I too am a big believer of technique.  Our priority exercises will be L- back squat, T- clean from deck or deads, U- still not sure.  I don’t like bench.  I’m trying to get the “how much do you bench” attitude out of our weight room.  I’m leaning to push jerk.  Any suggestions? I too want my focal point to be sqautting.  However, I was curious to hear some of your thoughts on how long you spend on technique before you begin the training program.      

     

    Thanks 

  • #31002

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     1 – The great thing about our program is it’s adaptability.  In our football program we began to do more football related work on Wednesday afternoons so we moved Session L to Friday and made that our non run day and lower body focus

     

    2 – Until recently I did not use straps except for wrist issues on the front squat.  My colleague at Triple Threat Performance Ethan Banning was working with my son on Hang Cleans and RDL’s and utilized straps.  I have since began using straps for these to movements as I am do not want grip to be a limiting factor on volume and tonnage.

     

    WORDS WIN

    COACH KENN

  • #31006

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Miller,

     

    I suggest looking at the Block Zero Presentation available during the “Professional Portal – Presentations” tab.  The presentation really takes you through a step-by-step approach to the different aspects of attacking the athletic position.  Also on a side note, I would spend as much time as needed for the athletes to establish the athletic position (6-8 wks).  Understand that this can also be used in your movement sessions as a part of the warm-up/activation prior to moving. 

     

    As for the Upper Body movement, the Push Jerk would more or less be categorized in the Total Body category.  I understand completely about the notion of almost every HS athlete wanting to know “How Much Ya Bench?”. I too was in a situation where I took over a program where athletes were able to pick weights which became a disaster.  Some athletes were picking too low, while others were suppose to get 6 reps and they performed 1RMs + 5 assisted reps.  Understand that you are the coach and you can dictate what loads are being put on the bar.  Find a 1RM-5RM in the Bench or any other Upper body exercise and start low on the percentage scale and see how it goes.  There will be some who resist but in my experience they all saw the benefits and began to beleive in the system.

     

    Also, Push-Ups and Push-Up variations (i.e. feet elevated, w/ a wt. vest, w/ chains, w/ a mini-band) can be used in a simple progression to get the athletes stronger in the upper body.  Plus, you’ll get the added bonus of having a close chain exercise so the core musculature will be stressed as well.

     

    Hope my 2 cents is worth anything.  Sorry for the long drawn-out post.

     

     

  • #31007

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     Sorry for the short reply but as soon as I saw push jerk I had to reply.  Number one problem I see with high school athletes coming into college with major shoulder issues is, Their coaches do Jerks and Snatches thinking they will get explosive with out doing any pure strength movements to develop the shoulder capsule!!!!!  Hard for me to think coaches would go right to Jerks with out even thinking about Overhead Presses, which happen to be our tier 1 upper body movement for Block Zero and Block One athletes.

    Words Win

    Coach Kenn

  • #31008

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     We work almost everyday on athletic position

  • #31014

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Coach Kenn and Forum-
     

    I would like to hear what others are doing right now in terms of speed development and speed endurance work right now. I am trying to come up with a plan that will satisy what the coaches want and what the athletes need.

     

    Right now we are spending most of our time in a basic GPP phase (little to know running). we are using two complexes for our conditoning right now (one med ball one barbell). Both are “finishers” at the end of a higher CNS stress workout.

     

    Coaches want to get rid of that in place of a timed 1.5mile run, and a second day of 5x800M (they say is for speed endurance).

     

    Feedback?

     

    Thanks,

     

    CW

     

     

  • #31009

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Since my first post, I have viewed the Block Zero presentation a few times and think it is great!.  I have been working with our players for two weeks now using the Block Zero method.  My players love the change and are improving everyday.  Thank  you for your response about the push-jerk.  It makes sense.  Is it better to begin with seated or standing press?  What about the push press?  Does the added assistance from the legs increase the potential risk for injury in high school kids? 

  • #31010

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Thank you for your response.  I found your remarks very insightful.  I appreciate the length in your response as well. 

  • #31011

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     We start with Standing Front Press, we will do some push presses with our freshman college athletes.  I do not Jerk or Wide Grip Snatch any athlete with the exception of high level ones or throwers.  My 2 cents, get ’em strong.  I haven’t even considered jerks or push presses for my high school athletes.

  • #31015

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     What sport are we talking about.  I am doing a 30 minute linear day with Session T, a 30 minute lateral day with Session U, and a 30 minute Throw and Jump Day with Session L with my high school and elite gpp groups.  I will have a base template of my training sessions up within the next 2 weeks

  • #30968

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     I recommend you research, Cytosport’s collegiate series muscle milk products

  • #31012

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Thank you for your input on the Standing Front Press.  You mentioned you don’t Wide Grip Snatch, but what about DB Single Arm Snatch?  Is this movement too advanced for high school?  My background is more in power lifting and bodybuilding.  I haven’t studied the Olympic movements and don’t feel very confident in the teaching progressions of these exercises.  However, since the Tier System is an Athletic based system, I know it is important to include Olympic lifts.  My concerns with Olympic lifts like the Power Clean is one, getting all of my assistant coaches on the same page, and two, not having enough time to teach it properly.  What are your thoughts about using the Hang Clean as my priority lift for Total Body? 

     

    As you know, high school coaches face many challenges when trying to develop a strength training program.  No bigger than trying to change a culture of loosing.  At this point I am putting together a 3 X 4 Tier program:

                                         Total = Hang Clean, Dead Lift, Clean Pull from Hang, DB Single Arm Snatch

                                         Lower = Back Squat, Front Squat, Lunge (variations), Parnter Glute Ham Raise

                                         Upper = Bench Press, Standing Front Press, Close Grip Bench Press, DB Swings

     

    I would appreciate any input you might have, especially for Total movements.     

  • #31017

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Coach,

     

    Aside from football usually being a typical T-L-U rotation (you had mentioned that some Block IV or Elite template athletes were using a T-L-T rotation).  Do these tier rotations match your rationale for other sports?

     

    Basketball – T-L-T        Baseball – T-L-U          Softball – T-L-U            T&F – T-L-T        Soccer – L-T-L           Tennis – L-T-L

     

    Cross Country – L-T-L        Volleyball – T-L-T      Golf – T-L-T?       Swimming/Diving – T-L-U       Wrestling – T-L-U or T-L-T?

     

    Also, I was wondering if you could go into more detail about the Preparation Progression that you were talking about while I was visiting.  I have been performing the AB/ADduction in between warm-up sets and have noticed as big difference in activation and mobility.

     

    Looking forward to your response.

  • #31013

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     I do use DB SA Snatch with High School Athletes.  This weekend we will launch the sale of our tetaching progression for the Deck Clean – Push Jump Punch.  A great resource.  We have had tremendous feedback.  If I am concerned about cleans, I go back to my staples, DEADLIFT and CLEAN GRIP POWER PULL from the Deck.  These are my 2 favorite total body movements.  I would consider DB Swings a total body movement.

  • #31018

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Also, in one of your posts to Sandeen you said…

     

    “repetition exception – This is something new and one of the ways we build in evals into our training.  I have developed a set of rules for prilepin’s chart and this part of our developing cycles.   In a 4 week performance cycle week 2 will be what we call a load week and a repetition exception day.  What we do is we set a multiple rep max usually to 10-12 for bench and squats.  Depending on the total body reps we will max to 5.  This is done on the last working set so if we are doing 5×5 at 76% set 5 will be done for max 10-12 reps.  We record this number and it is posted for our guys to compare rep ranking we will see ranges anywhere from 5-15 on these sets and had a guy go 17 last summer.”

     

    I understand the reasoning behind having an built-in eval into the training and I think it’s really important when gauging athletes and their level of preparedness.  But I was wondering if you start with with Block I and use it with each Block (1-4) periodically? Also, are there any certain times in the annual plan that you have ”repitiion exception” used (i.e. in the middle of a cycle or stage).  It sort of reminds me of DeLormes (sp?)  Auto-Regulation model but used instead to evaluate the success of the prorgam.  Brilliant stuff!

     

    Sorry for all the loaded questions.

  • #31021

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     Coach,

     

    Is there a certain percentage / set / rep scheme that you follow with your athletes on test day?

     

    We do a 10-12 minute warmup outside then head in and start getting ready for the lift. Often we see some of our athletes miss a lift the 1st time then come back and get it on the 2nd attempt and then keep having successful lifts for 3-4 more attempts. I’ve tried to extend the warmup by a few minutes and we’ve tried a few different progressions, percentage wise, to get ready. But, i don’t feel we’ve benefited from any of that.

     

    The best “test” day we’ve ever had was last summer when we tested 40’s first, then came in to Power Clean. I’m thinking it’s not a coincidence. 

     

    -Matt

  • #31016

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Coach Kenn-

     

    Sorry, talking about dIII football here.

     

    CW

  • #31023

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Coach,

     

    I’m looking into writing up a whole program from beginning to end which includes PAP, lift, conditioning, extra work, etc. and was wondering if you had any advice on where I should begin.  I am doing this for own personal benefit so when I get a chance to run my own program I will have all my ducks in a row.  Is this something that can be done without any knowledge of the athletes that I will have or can I begin to write up a basic template and adjust to the athletes that I would have.  If anyone else has any additional comments, please don’t hesistate as I will benefit from any helpful comments.

     

    Thank you,

     

    Alan

  • #31022

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     We have always had great results on our clean sessions after a linear speed session

     

    our preparation progression for testing is

    50% x 5-8

    65% x 3-5

    80% x 2-3

    90% x 1-3 

    100% x1  this is your first attempt usually about 90-92.5 of training estimate

  • #31024

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     you can definitely build the program and then make adjustments.   It doesn’t matter if you are in your situation or mine, you always will be making necessary adjustments for individual athletes

  • #31019

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    bump

  • #31025

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Alan I think that was a great question for Joe.  If young coaches without the opportunity to train a team yet would think as you have done they can see how things develop and changes on the fly that need to be made or even complete a cycle then make some changes to see if it affects your prior outcome.  If you can train yourself to certain strength levels you know it works and you feel comfortable training that way.  I didn’t aquat over 600 until I was over 40 because I had got out of PL for awhile and new training programs had been developed and I went to meets and took something from everyone and created my program.  Joe once told me you can make guys strong you just don’t know all the whys of why they get strong.  Then I studued!!!   

  • #31026

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    I heard Coach Kenn speak at the Villanova conference last year and was really intrigued by what he said.  I have tired this out with myself and worked tremendously.  As much as I would love to try this out with my teams, I am in a certain situation to where I have to follow the head coach’s periodization with all of my teams and can not try new things with them.  Right now I am just trying to create a portfolio, so when I walk into a job interview in the future, I can show the AD that this is what I will be doing. 

  • #31003

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     Thanks Coach Kenn and congrats on getting the Panthers job! That is right down the road from me.  I look forward to seeing you on the field from the stands on game day. 

  • #31004

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Congrats Coach on the new job!

  • #31020

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    If anyone have any opinions or advise to the Tier Rotations or other questions, please feel free to add to the thread.  I’m here to learn from everyone inlcuding Coach Kenn.

  • #31035

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Coach Kenn

     

    I love the site and your training system.  I am going to using it this upcoming summer for my own training going into my senior year of college football.  I was wondering if you could either send me or post a more up to date running program then the one posted in the professional portal.  I know you have noticed you have made many changes in your program from year to year and was wondering what changes you have made in your running program.  Again keep up the great work and I look forward to hearing from you.

     

    Eric Mannes

  • #31036

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     Eric

    Be on the look out we will be adding more material shortly.  We have been gathering programs to get ready to upload.

    The Big House Power Staff

  • #31037

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Coach

     

    Thanks for the quick response and Congratulations on the new job…I was wondering where the next place you were going to break in next.  I am really  looking forward to the new material.

     

    Eric Mannes

  • #31038

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Coach,

     

    I hope all is well.  I was wondering what your ideas were, philosophically, about training NFL players rather than Collegiate Athletes.  Do you still introduce some of the lower trained athletes to a Modified Block Zero?  Also are you still ranking these athletes in regard to Block I, Block, II, Block III, ect?  I just like to hear how you’re approaching introducing the players to your Tier System and how has your experience impacted/evolved the Tier System. 

     

    Also, I was wondering if you have any example cycles for sports like Soccer, Volleyball, or other sports where training would differ from Football.  I’m really looking forward to the material you’ll be posting. 

     

    Thanks Coach,

     

    Tolzman

  • #31039

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     We will not have a block system for the athtletes.  We will do more individual auto regulation when necessary.  We will have 5 base programs, Front 7, Front 7 Level 2, Outside the Box, QB’s, Specialists.  Remember these athletes are truly elite in their sport, but not necessarily in the weight rioom or with specific drill.  We will always have some Block Zero components with any athletes.  Remember some of these guys will not be able to perform a true pistol squat or chin up to name a couple of specifics.  We have done some minor adjustments to the tier system, but nothing to break the integrity of the template.  

     

     

    As far as cycles anything I would do would be based on my development of a structured usage of Prilipen’s Table as well as my own innovation called Volume Accumulation Training.  When necessary I may go back to some traditional sets reps schemes for slightly more volume per set, but I doubt it, especially on the college level.

  • #31040

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Is Volume Accumulation Training similar to the House EDT you were describing when I visited?  I’ve been using it with various assistance lifts and have see  improvements since implementing it into my training. 

  • #31041

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     Yes but now I have it planned and charted and it is working

  • #31042

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    I’d really like to hear how you planned and charted it out.  I was utilizing it much like Starr’s 5×5 or Wendlers 5/3/1, where I tack on 5-10# each cycle.

  • #31043

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     Sorry to MATT MARTIN for this late post.

     

    BHP has been doing a lot of professional development on completing cycling – sets and reps – packages for updated programming.  One that has driven interest and has some merit in our “medley” training is “Asanovich Sets”.  I call them this because I was listening to a podcast from Coach Asanavich and he was explaining some variations of sets and reps schemes.

     

    If you are not familiar with Coach Asanovich, he has been a tremendous strength and conditioning coach for over 20 years in the NFL.  Coach is a more of a traditional HIT programmer but has come up with a unique cluster that is slightly different than the typical 1 set to exhaustion exposed by true HIT coaches, not the hybrid models of today.  Although BHP methodology is different than Coach Asanovich, we hold him in high regard as we have been fortunate to be in the audience when he has presented and like how he structures his programs.  Plus, one of our most dedicated supporters, Dirk Koetter holds him in high regards.

     

    You will have to be a “coach” and determine a proper starting load for this set.

     

    Goal is 21 reps, this is an ascending rep cluster.

    – Choose your load

    – perform one rep with a specific designated tempo.  Our standard tempo is X-1-2-1

    – rest 10 seconds or 10 counts

    – perform two reps 

    – rest 10 seconds or 10 counts

    – perform three reps

    – rest 10 seconds or 10 counts

    – perform four reps

    – rest 10 seconds or 10 counts

    – perform five reps

    – rest 10 seconds or 10 counts

    – perform six reps

     

    Obviously the goal is to accomplish the total reps.   If this occurs, move weight up for next session.  If not stay with weight until goal is accomplished.  We really like this type of set with our horizontal and vertical pulls, especially with Hammer Plate Loaded equipment.

     

    WORDS WIN 

    BHP Staff

     

    Here is the basic outline as 

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