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This topic contains 371 replies, has 29 voices, and was last updated by  @wesomeWG 1 year, 9 months ago.

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  • #29455

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster
  • #31044

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     BHP STAFF is sorry for issues with member forum.  We will do our best to see if we can retrieve older post.

  • #31045

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    What prgraming do you use during the season?  Would you go from a 3×5 to a 3×3 tier?

  • #31046

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Mojo,

     

    I look at it as a balancing act.  During the offseason, the skills training of the athlete are low so I can push the weights more.  During the competitive season, the skills training of the athlete are at it’s highest so I pull back from the weights. Plus, at a 3×5 scheme, the athlete will be more prone to be sore which can take away from practice or game play due to the extra volume that exists when compared to the 3×3 scheme.

     

    Offseason – 3×5 scheme

    Inseason – 3×3 scheme

     

    With this said, if you have any athletes who aren’t seeing much playing time, a 3×5 scheme would be appropriate because those athletes have more energy/time to be directed towards weight training.

     

     

  • #31047

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     I’m a little confused as to whats different than the free site? dosen’t seem to a whole lot different?

  • #31048

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    You should access to Professional Portal and Parent Portal that does not show up to free subscribers and the member forum which you are accessing to send this post – Please let us know if you are do not see these tabs in your menu

     

    BHP Staff

  • #31049

    mbooth
    Member

    I will soon be taking a position in a new system coordinating the strength and conditioning for grades 6-12.  I have already looked at the example of “Block 0” under the professional portal.  I am curious as to what the protocol is for advancing from Block 0 to Block 1.  If your athletes are performing all of the exercises prescribed do you immediately move them to Block 1, or do you train them all as Block 1 athletes for the entire year. Also, is there any other sites I could use to help me formulate a plan of attack.  I noticed in one post there was mention of another book or something.  I wasn’t sure if there was any more information out there that could help me.  Thanks

  • #31050

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Mike,

    Nice meeting you this weekend at the Hammer Strength Clininc in ATL – If you have any more direct questions please email direct

    WORDS WIN!

    BHP STAFF

  • #31051

    mbooth
    Member

    Coach,

     

    I e-mailed you with my school e-mail on Monday or Tuesday.  Not sure if you knew it was me.  Shoot me a  quick e-mail to let me know if you got it. Thanks.

  • #31053

    brokinrhythm
    Participant

    Must say I’ve received a lot less than I expected for $60!

  • #31055

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    I just signed up for the forum yet again.  I haven’t been a member for quite some time simply due to the fact that I’ve migrated away from the tier system over the past few years.  Now that I’m back, I want to bring up something that always confused me and possibly caused my initial shift away from the Tier System in the first place.  The volume of work associated with the program seems quite high as compared to most any other program I’ve done.  And I’m an old guy in this game, currently 36, with 22 solid years of consistent training.  

     

    That said, I understand that the driver for this volume, is that of an increased work capacity.  However, shouldn’t increased work capacity and conditioning be done in a sport specific manner and not in the weight room?  Aren’t we using the weight room to not only increase absolute strength, but also increase the strength of tendons and ligaments in hopes of injury prevention.  Both of which are only accomplished via the heaviest weights manageable.

     

    Also, in efforts to limit gym time, might I ask what a typical rest ratio or rest period is for a SME Tier 1 exercise with the standard 6-10 work sets?  I want to keep the work time down, but also don’t want to sacrifice quality work due to rest intervals being too short to develop quality strength.

     

    Thanks.

  • #31056

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     Addendum – as I tend to overthink damn near everything.  Seeing as how the volume is often skewed to the high end of prilipen’s chart, and the total voulme is high in general.  I can’t help but wonder if the quality of athleticism seen by your staff is that which 99% of the population does not possess.  Thus, higher volume is needed and warranted for athletes which can tolerate such loads.  But for the remainder of the popluation, it just leads to burn out???  Or is it possible that the general population just has such a low work capacity?

     

    Another question I have to ask is whether or not you’ve found yourself to sometimes overcomplicate the non-sport “training”.  It seems that we as performance enthusiats complicate and overwork the strength or conditioning portion of our training, at the expense of time and quality work spent on the ACTUAL sport.  I truly feel that the only way to get better at a sport is to play it.  If so much emphasis is put on non-sport activity, what is left for QUALITY sport training.  

     

    I went through an AM running and afternoon U session on Friday, following a 3×5 template with emphasis on SME and 75% 1RM, with volume at the high end of the Prilipen chart.  First time I’ve gone Tier for 2 years.  I got through the whole thing in under an hour, excluding the warmup.  I was exhausted, which makes me think my work capacity has been lessened, but my CNS wasn’t shot, which is almost always the case with my past 2 years of training.  

     

    But that leads me back to the initial post.  Isn’t the weight room where I want to fry my CNS, and the turf where I want to up my work capacity?

     

     

     

     

  • #31054

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Sorry for your disappointment. Our Forum has never had much traffic.  If you have any ideas, Please let us know.  Coach Kenn will be answering questions posted on this forum starting the month of September every Tuesday, which is his player’s off day.

     

    BHP Staff

  • #31059

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    [QUOTE]brokinrhythm wrote

    Must say I’ve received a lot less than I expected for $60!

    [/QUOTE]

     

    The book alone is well worth over $60!  Granted there isn’t a lot of traffic….yet, but how many people get the opportunity to converse with a legitimate professional level strength coach.  And not one who earned his position via genetic talents, but mental evaluation of athletes at all levels.  I live where Coach Kenn spent almost a decade training collegiate athletes.  I run in to MANY of those athletes, and have yet to meet one who didn’t have anything but positive things to say about Joe.  

     

    The reason I came back to this site is for the simple fact that I don’t question anyone whom I can’t learn something from.  The questions I pose to Joe and others at his level are not based on disagreement.  They are simply a way to better understand methodologies such that when I apply them, I can better understand why something does or does not work.  

     

    Stick around….it WILL get better, or I wouldn’t be here.

     

  • #31060

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    I believe the number one issue I see with your overall interpretation of the Tier System is that it is a volume based program.  This is incorrect.  The system’s objective was to build a model of training based around the structured rotation of movements.  Although, in the general model we placed a set value to each tier, the truth is the program designer determines the VOLUME, not the system.  The system determines what particular exercise/movement choice is represented in each session and each tier.  Our cycle examples are just that.  Numerous coaches who use our template, never even use our cycles.  You are not the first coach who interpreted out model this way.  I hope this clears some of your thoughts up. 

     

    Our rest is usually based on partner rotations of 3 to a group possibly 4 on occasions

     

    Word’s Win

    Coach

     

  • #31061

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Again volume is manipulated by the program designer. We have utilized this system with over 20 sports in various levels of training age and chronological age since 1991.  We have dealt with athletes with extremely low athleticism to 1st round draft picks.  Each has adapted to the level of programming designed for them.  I can only speak to our trainng environements, but we feel that three main strength training sessions per week at an average of 75 minutes of less give us ample time to for the sport coaches to work on the specific needs of the athlete, as well as our general specific conditioning/movement sessions on the field.

     

    I do believe that most of the general population of today has a low work capacity because they did not grow up in the “free play” era.

     

    As far as overcomplicate, I beleive I personally have simplified my approach while addng in necessities that are needed in the overall training of the athlete.  I believe we can over work the athlete if we do not keep in mind the demands of the sport. At  different times the volume of specifc work is at an extreme low and other times it dominates the weekly demands, ala the in season.  That is why it is important to be involved in planning meetings with sport coaches.  This is something that is extremely hard for private sector coaches.  Also, I can say this because I was in the private sector, private sector coaches may not worry about the things out of their control and maximize performance results because that is how they retain clients.  note, I am not talking about every private sector coach.

     

    Maybe I am not as educated as others, but I am not sure I ever want to FRY my CNS.  I believe strength/power capacity training in the weight room has merit.  We highly beleive in it.  Most athletes need to be able to maintain a certain level of strength and power for multiple responses during a game.  Having them prepare for this both on and off the field, I believe is a good thing.

     

    There are many ways to skin a cat, we are fortunate that we have seen extremely solid returns on the athlete’s sport of choice utilizing our methodology.  I always reserve the right to be wrong and can understand if we agree to disagree which happens to us with our “GO TO” colleagues

     

    Thank you for your posts

    Word’s Win

    Coach

  • #31062

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     Thanks for the time and explanation House.  I hope I can call you that?  Seems like something you only “earn” through training under your tutilege.  

     

    We all can be wrong, as no two athletes respond the same, to the same programming.  It’s that difference which makes you “right” or “wrong”.  As I stated in another thread, I’ll never say anyone else is right or wrong.  Questioning your methods and results allows me to better understand why/how things do or don’t work with myself and the kids I coach.  The better I understand things, the easier it is to make adjustments in the right direction.  And I wouldn’t even question your methods if I didn’t utterly respect them.

     

    I agree with the whole era of kids not developing a great work capacity.  I see it in my own kids and the younger ones I’m working with.  They sit around all day and maybe are active a few times a week.  I grew up on a farm, where you worked all day every day, AND then played your sport that evening.  Work capacity was never an issue then, but also probably instilled a bit too much desire to “outwork” others, and not out perform them.  Finding that balance has been tough lately.  The further up the ladder of competition you go, the harder it is to be a jack of all trades. 

  • #31068

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Starting in September of 2013, Coach Kenn will be answering questions posted once per week on Tuesday’s.  Coach Kenn is extremely upset with himself for not adding content during his first two years as a NFL Head Strength and Conditioning Coach.  He wants to be more active as his name is on the site and he owes the membership. 

     

    Coach and the staff are working hard to figure out the best plan to add content in a timely manner, whether it is monthly, bimonthy, or weekly.  We have numerous hours of film we are trying to edit, Coach is the only one who can do this, to get to our paid members.  We have also learned that one of our hard drives “Blew Up” that left us with a tremendous amout of content loss.

     

    Coach has begun preparing the outline for his new book on the TIER SYSTEM and will post randomn mini blasts that will be a part of his new material.

     

    Thank you for sticking by us and to our newest members thank you for joining our team.

     

    BHP STAFF

  • #31069

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     I may have missed it…..but I would like to see more of your summer conditioning templates.  I see what appears to be only the PAP for such in 2009?  Has the format changes much from what is outlined in your 2004 presentation slides?  

     

    Thanks!

     

  • #31070

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Just a quick response for now.  As you stated in a private email some of the volume of conditioing had been somewhat reduced through out the years from 2001 to 2009.  The biggest reason for this is what you had asked about general versus specific training.  Over this time period the over abudnace of PRP’s player run practice increase in college summer programs all over the country.  What this did was add on average 2 session a week of “conditioning” on top of the strength and conditionng plan.  These PRP’s are player lead but COACH DRIVEN!  Don’t be fooled.  These practices are scripted by coaches to make sure the plays are being run.  I observed a top ten team’s player run practice and the had period board going and the quarterback had a the practice plan ad playbook out.  He also had the whistle around his neck to move the groups.  These lasted approx an hour.  It is the s/c coach’s duty to monitor overall training volume and these additional hours took away from the plan we created.  There is only so much fuel in the tank and the s/c coach is usually the only one who worries/watches everything!

  • #31057

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Bump.



    House, 



    I answered this question a year ago and still utilize a 3×3 scheme to this day when it comes to In-Season training, but would love to hear what you’re thoughts are to In-Season training and what you’d recommend.

  • #31071

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Coach,

     

    I’m glad to see that the forum is back up and running.  For those who are new, this forum can serve as a great platform to share and bounce ideas off of while picking one of the greatest minds in S&C or more appropriately, Physical Preparation.

     

    As for my question, what have you found to be the most productive/successful way to create/design/perform a pre game warm-up.  If anyone else has any input into the way they are structuring their pre game warm-ups, feel free to chime in.  We are all here to learn.

     

    I’ve been a member of this website for a while now, and I am really looking forward to the material that is to come in the future.  Thanks for your time, House. 

  • #31058

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Will discuss more as we put together new book programming. We still use the3 Tiered model, in college we trained 3 days per week. Sunday Session T Tuesday Session L Thursday Session U.  In the NFL we train a 2×3 Monday Session T Wed/Thurs Session U.  Modifications are made in exercise/moevement choices per position groups.  Friday is a blitz day or the NFL guys.  Our Practice Squad guys train 3×3 Session L Monday Session U Wednesday Session T Friday Blitz/Mobility Saturday

  • #31072

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Pre Game Warm Ups >>>>>>>>> who knows what to do? Serioulsy, I have done many different things it is ridiculous.  i wish I had an exact answer.  A lot has to do with how much time is alloted to you during the entire pre game package. At Arizona State we had 7 minutes in the NFL I have 5. In those 5 minutes I have to allot for the team getting into the stretch lines as well as the final team break before individual.  If it is a big game it may take them longer to line up because guys are “Hyped” when we lead the linemen out of the tunnel.  My last year at ASU, we had a new coach and we did not have a team stretch on the field, we stretched position groups in locker room before the left for field.

     

    We do a basic in place flexibility.  Reason, simple organization. Except for the linemen most teams will have the rest of the positions out on the field for at least 10 minutes, so they have been moving around.  I know all the research about static movements before work.  I also know this is a good time for the guys to relax and focus before the team prep work begins.

     

    I have done movement work with my college guys in the 7 minute pre game.  In the NFL you see a lot of guys who have pre game rituals and if they need my help then I assist.  We have guys who take th ealry bus 3 hours before and go to the field and get a nice lather going.  Others take the late bus and do very little before game time.  I work with a handful of the dline in the pre game prep before the official pre game routine.  These guys know how to turn it on and what they need to do to prepare. College guys need a some more guidance.

     

    I would say my pre game thought process was always based on the time allotted and Head Coach wants.  Our first year at ASU we needed to coach effort, we actually did movement work with a up-down to start the drill!  Not sure that was smart to do but we had to instill our demands.

     

    I would recommend on the collegiate level because the halftimes are longer to go out earlier than usual an move around some before second half begins.  We used to do 3 tuck jumps to burst for 5-6 reps.

     

    WIsh I had a definative answer for you.

     

    WORD’S WIN

    Coach

  • #31073

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Hi Coach Kenn,

     

    I learned about your Tier System through the interview you did with Greg Everett and think it’s a great system. I’m looking forward to your new book!

     

    Given that you’ve trained some high level tennis teams throughout your career, I’m wondering what your experience has been in regard to how well traditional strength training applies to the sport? My impression is that it has a similar importance compared to most other sports that require a mix of power and endurance (soccer, basketball, etc.), but I rarely see the major lifts (squat, deadlift, clean [even if just high pull], bench) emphasized for tennis players.

     

    Do you think that training the major lifts is important for tennis performance? If so, within the context of all the qualities and skills a tennis player needs to train, are there numbers for the major lifts (relative to bodyweight perhaps) you would like to see your tennis players achieve before shifting focus more towards other priorities?

     

    Even if not related to this question, I’d be happy to hear any insights you’d like to share about training tennis players.

     

    Thanks,

    Vin

  • #31075

    tyler10p
    Participant

    What are some examples of the Blitz workouts you guys do? Also the book talks about Extra Workouts that would be done on either lifting days or off days. How do you decide what workout is prescribed for that day?

  • #31074

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    We were fortuante to have great coaches who beleived in our work and the fact that we would do risk/reward analysis on movements for each sport.  When I was at Boise State, our tennis coach was one of the most supportive coaches I have ever worked with.  I have three championships rings at home that he rewarded me and my assistant with for our work with his team.  I can tell you they squatted, clean pulled, etc.  You are correct they are what most sports are power capacity sports.  The type of sport in which you must display intense bursts of power continously over an extended period of time. 

     

    It would be hard for me to compare college team tennis players to elite ones because I have not worked with a professional tennis player.  I will give you my opinion on why you may not see many elite players doing multiple joint barbell lifts.  Number one would be their schedules do not allow them to train with the intent to gain strength.  Why, their schedule, competitive season is extremely long.  There regeneration stage is very short.  I would guess there strength trainng is based on keeping the primary movers agonist and atagonist muscle groups in condition.  Plus at that level, I have heard they train on the court similar to a swimmer’s dry land training.

     

    If I trained an elite tennis player we would do some type of bilateral squat and most likely a dumbbell single arm snatch.  I would never do any barbell upper body work, even rowing.

     

    Great question.

    Word’s Win

    Coach Kenn

  • #31076

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Blitz and Extra Sessions are in essence the same.  They are shorter duration programs that basically are individual needs programs.  When we first started blitzes we did have guys doing five extra sessions per week.  In my later years at ASU and at Louisville, we utilized the majority of our blitz work on our conditioning days, Tuesdays and Thursdays.  At the NFL level we utilize our blitz programs on our major conditioning day, with are injured reserve athletes and for a 3rd lift in season for active 53 and a fourth session for our practice squad

     

    If I had an athlete perform blitz type programs on the same day as major strength sessions they would be specifically for those athletes who are rehabbing/prehabbing an injury or ailment.  I would keep my general blitzes for the conditioning days or off days.  We found we had to pul back the general blitzes as we were expending too much emphasis in strength training depleting energy for the other traits we needed our athletes to improve on also.

     

    Our primary emphasis fo general blitzes are root work (core) and posterior/anterior shoulder-upper back programs

     

    A sample of a shldr/upper back blitz may look like

     

    3 rounds

    Face Pulls x20

    Lateral Raise x20

    Prone Retractions x20

    Plate Raise x20

    Standard Shrug Single Arm x20 each

    Band External Rotation x20 each

     

    Hope this helps

    WORD’s WIN

    Coach Kenn

  • #31079

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     Have you reviewed Cal Dietz’s material on Triphasic training which is essentially block training for athletes?  I won’t go any further in to my thoughts on such, as I’m currently reading it and have yet to be apply anything or comment on it.  

  • #31080

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Have heard solid reviews, as for me, I have not read it.

     

    Coach Kenn

  • #31077

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     Here was my personal upper body blitz from today.

    duration 28:09

    2 rounds of Medley 1

    Balboa’s (std power clean) x20

    Bell’s Up Lateral Raise x10 std

    Bell’s Up W Raise x10 std

    Single Arm Shrug x15 each std

    3 Rounds of Medley 2

    Upper Body Elevated Pushups w log bar

    x15, 12, 10

    med Ball flexion and Extension shouldr to knee Root work (core) x12,15,15

    3rounds Medley 3

    Bell,s Up Single Arm Preacher Curl 3×10

    Band Reverse Pushdowns

    x35,35,x30

     

     

  • #31081

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Coach,

     

    I work with a military population in NC where the ages range between 25-40. I have two questions:

     

    1. How have you modified the Total Body Tiers with your older veteran players?  

    2. Are you starting all new players (rookies and free agents) in your program in a NFL modified “Block Zero”? 

     

    Thank you for your time, and I look forward to your reply.

     

    Mike

  • #31078

    tyler10p
    Participant

    Great info thanks for the reply

  • #31086

    tyler10p
    Participant

     

  • #31087

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     Perfect timing!  I was just about to start a thread on this as well.  There is much debate about whether the hi-low method is applicable to the average individual, stemming from the fact that much of what Charlie Francis did was based on his work with elite athletes.  I’ll dismiss the drug correlations, simply because almost all athletes at the time were using them.  The true crux to consider is whether or not methods that work for the elite, will ever work for the ordinary?  My personal feeling is no.

     

    You also have to consider the fact that true one time speed requires every muscle cell to fire at once and be as fresh as possible.  That’s not going to happen unless you have 48-72 hours of full recovery.

     

    That said, I agree with the fact that it is good to have hard and easier days.  However, I also am of the opinion that the human body is designed to work hard EVERY day.  I know guys like Buddy Morris and James Smith of Pitt use the High-Low method, and it works for them.  I respect what they do and how they present it as well.  Maybe there is somethng to it, as speed kills.  However, one time speed doesn’t mean a thing in team sports.  The ability to repeat a given speed is what matters when it comes to alactic sports.

     

     

  • #31088

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    In my opinion, I feel that Charlie Francis was one of the brightest minds when it came to sports performance. In addition, I feel that the high/low sequencing can be utilized in conjunction with the Tier system.  M/W/F would all be intensive days where the athlete will experience the most CNS stress and T/R/S will serve as low CNS days. The only real problem I can see occurring would be having long days on the high intensive days. Those days would look like:

     

    1) Warm-Up

    2) Speed/Agility

    3) Jumps

    4) Throws

    5) Weights

    6) Conditioning

     

    Low intensive days would look like:

     

    1) Blitz

    2) Tempo

    or 

    1) Tempo

    2) Blitz

     

  • #31090

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     I think I brought this up in a private email, but as you stated, it needs to be shared with all for educational purposes.  What do you use as a determinant for your conversion of an athlete to a “weekly” concurrent setup?  Was it just something you tried, or is it part of the program which an athlete progresses to after a certain stage?

  • #31082

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     Mike,

    1 – As we have developed over time, we have classified several additional categories to the Total Body Tiers as it relates to athletes who progress through our program.  The first was utilizing single response jumps as a replacement to actual “lifts”.  Our primary jump is a Box Jump and it’s variations.  I also include rotational medball throws as well as land mine movements as alternatives to Total Body movements.

     

    2 – As the Block Zero concept is ever evolving and movements are added all the time to the point that I am not sure if all non barbell/dumbbell movements are not block zero in nature, yes we include block zero movements in a lot of what we do.  Most comes in our readiness work for field sessions as well as our reset and readiness in the strength sessions.

     

    Word’s Win

    Coach Kenn

  • #31083

    Coach Cash
    Participant

    Kettlebells movements are another great variation for Total Body Tiers.  Easy on the joints.

  • #31089

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     No I do not.  The Tier System was and is based on the traditional 3 day model of the Heavy Moderate Light principles as it pertains to the strength sessions.  The difference with the traditional HML and the Tier System’s is that the HML occurs in each session rather than a single session of each.  Therefore we look at the Tier System strength days as Moderate training sessions overall.

     

    Numerous years ago, I had a tremendous conversation witn Loren Seagraves at the Velocity world head quarters in Atlanta.  I explaind to him our 5 day weekly lay out and he went to the board after me and said the weekly structure was solid.  He considered our M W F overall plan as our nueral sessions and our T TH plan as our metabolic sessions.

     

    Although I have had several times where I did not like the design of a certain phase, we have never had issues with fatigue.  As far as overtarining, it is extremely hard to overtrain a competitive team athlete in the United States, regardless of level there are too many rules and regulations in place to ever have a lengthy enough program to put an athlete in an overtraining state.  My opinion!

     

    Word’s Win

    Coach Kenn

  • #31091

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    At this point in time most I would have replies.

     

    1 – If I were still training high school level athletes, I would be training a traditional model and spending a large time frame in my Volume Accumulation Training.  This is my primary cycle for size and base strength.  Depending on the age of the athlete would depend on the length of this training.  With 9th graders this could last two years.  I would then start training with sub maximal and maximal effort programming to build absolute strength.  I would not even consider training for “power” and “speed” as I beleive my absolute strength programming will these traits at this age.

     

    2 – For college age athletes we would do a similar programming but on a faster time line.  I would say based on the way I was programming my football athlete’s at the end of my ASU tenure and Louisville, true concurrent sequencing began with Block 3 and 4 level athletes.

     

    In the end everything falls into place by getting them stronger.  I have said this many times, want to get someone faster, get them stronger, you want to help reduce the potential for injury, get them stronger, you want to have them gain size and inprove lean body mass, get the stronger.

  • #31094

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     I was reading through an interview you did with Mladen Jovanovic.  In it you mentioned some of the changes that the Tier system had gone through.  Following is a recap….



    The biggest changes are coming in the lower tiers, tiers 4 and 5 as well as the addition of a neck tier, and the posterior chain and posterior shoulder tiers.  These are all done in what I call a medley fashion.   The definition of a medley is a mixture of various types of elements.  I liked this term instead of calling it a circuit.  We are experimenting right now with great success the medley starting the session as Pre Activity Preparation if the athlete is beginning the training session without a running component preceding it. 


    We also do multiple movements within Tiers 1-3.  Upper Body Tiers primarily will always be Pull/Push supersets, Lower Body Tiers could include a prehab/mobility movement and now include a Stabilization movement for the Power Zone (core), and the Total Body Tiers could include a jump and now include a Rotational movement for the Power Zone.”

     

    I don’t want you to give away too much as I know much of it will most likely be coming in your second release of “The Playbook”.  The real question I have regards the changes to tiers 4 and 5.  Can you detail what you mean by changes?  Is it simply the fact that you are doing the medley, or is there more too that?

     

    I know you’ve implemented jumping into the 4 and 5 tiers for total body movements.  If one complexes Tiers 1 and 2 with a mobility movement, does that negate the need for tiers 4 and 5?….e.g.  A clean which is complexed with a jump.

     

     

  • #31095

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    A long time ago (have no clue anymore on years) I had a conversation with Dave Tate about our template.  When we were speaking about tiers 4 and 5 specifically, he coined the term strength mobility exercises when I described the variations of movements that would be implemented into these tiers.

     

    These tiers are not being utilzed as “strength builders.”  They are used for additional volume and ROM capabilities.  We do not use much jumping movements in these tiers any longer because as you mentioned, we may utilize them in a complex or as a Total Body Tier 3 movement.  I do not think you would negate Tiers 4 and 5 but, you may only need 2 sets of work.

     

    We have estabilshed a base set of rules for our preparation progresions within each tier, that focus on a root, reset, reactive, and resistance movement protocal for each.

     

    Where you ask if one adds in a mobility movement with tiers 1 and 2 I would think more of a activation movement for those tiers. I will give you this tidbit.  Our rules now – total body movements, reset (activation) movements are hip flexion and extension – lower body movements, reset movements are adduction and abduction movemements – upper body movements, reset movements are retraction, protraction, elevation and depression.

     

    Word’s Win

    Coach Kenn

  • #31084

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Thanks Coaches. 

     

    With the implementation of jumps during the Total Body Tiers, has this changed your foot contacts during plyo sessions in your linear/lateral speed programming?

     

    Mike

  • #31085

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Yes, we primarily utilize single response double leg jumps in the strength sessions and single leg work on the field.  We do not do single leg jumps with our Front 7 Interior line.  They utilize more med ball launches and throws than the Outside the Box and Front 7 Level 2 athletes.

     

    Word’s Win

    Coach Kenn

  • #31100

    Coach Cash
    Participant

    I know one of the goals of House’s for the website is active engagement among members.  So I hope we can get some dialog going on a regular basis….So let’s start with the Tier System and any adaptations memebers have made over time. 

     

    For me… I recently left college and took a high school strength job.  After 5 months, I am a firm believer my kids need to stick within a traditional template.  But my plan is to progress from Block Zero to Block Three.  Block Three being athletes in their senior year of high school–perhaps even their spring semester of their senior year as they are preparing for college athletics.  Howeve, I will have some athletes that may never leave Block 1 or 2.  Not all athletes will mature and develop at the same rate. The great thing about the Tier System is that it can be applied for any ground based sport, for any athlete, at any level.  Below is my general template.  I try to use all types of volume and intensity prescriptions–Prilipen, linear periodization, undulating periodization, denisty training, APRE, 5-3-1 Method, etc.)  Below is my typical 3 x 5  

     

    Day 1–Total

                Lower (Volume or Dynamic depending of time of year)

                Upper (Volume Tier–Push/Pull)

                Total (Kettlebell or Jumping variation Tier)

                Lower (SL Horizontal Plane)

    Day 2–Lower

                Upper (Volume Pull Tier)

                Total (Olympic Technique Tier or Volume Deadlift–depending on time of year)

                Lower (SL Vertical Plane)

                Upper (SA Push w/ Complementing pull)

    Day 3–Upper

                Total (Complex, Technique Tier)

                Lower (Volume w/ Front Squat or SL Squat variation)

                Upper (SA Push w/ complementing pull)

                Total (Kettlebell Tier/Jumping variation Tier)

     

    With a Block One athlete I place a heavy emphasis on continuing body weight exercises.  I pair technique sets (or warm up sets) with exercises from our block zero program.  I also believe that variance of the Block Zero exercises (tempo, isometrics, pauses) are

  • #31063

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     Just wanted to give a followup to my work capacity comments and relate to Joe from his days in AZ.  

     

    My most recent L session, 49 working sets is 65 minutes.  Need to improve that a touch.  I cut myself some slack though considering that it was 115 outside, and even hotter in the garage where we train.  Wife says I’m crazy.  Good ole AZ.

  • #31119

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     I was reading a bit about SST and neuromuscular training as it pertains to sport.  I even dug up some old stuff that Tomlinson did in his off season training.  I despise quoting the efforts of a professional athlete, as in most cases, they don’t correspond to the average athlete.  But the exercises and point of such has merit to my point.  

     

    I’m of the opinion that neuromuscular training is lacking in most regimes, as it’s one component that would have high sport transference.  In essence we are teaching the mind and muscles to react faster.  Reaction time is everything is sport.  Agreed?  Should emphasis be placed on this ability?  If so, where in the daily/weekly training should it fall?  I know it has to be done early, prior to CNS drain.  But should it fall before weight training days, or prior to conditioning days, after a warmup, or both?

     

    If the above has merit, does anyone have examples or a resource for constructing SST and neuromuscular exercises.  As an example, a mogul skiier would benefit from angled block jumping back and forth.   

     

     

  • #31064

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     That is actually pretty solid for a session L.  I hit my session U on Saturday 69 sets in 70:11.  Would have been better got caught in a couple of small conversations

     

    Coach Kenn

  • #31120

    Coach Cash
    Participant

    Are you refereing to neuromuscular training and the prevention of knee injuries?

  • #31101

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    When starting athletes on a tiered program I will always go back to my base fundamentals to develop the necessary movement patterns needed to add variety at a later stage.  I am speaking specifically about the strength session and for those athletes who are prepared to begin a 2nd Level Block Zero in to a Block 1 program.

     

    Session T

    T1 – Deadlift variation starting with Octagon Deadlift [high handle hex bar]

    T2 – Free Hand Barbell Squat to Box

    T3 – Chin Up [assisted if needed]

    PC – Hip Bridge

    PS – “T” Raise

     

    Session L

    T1 – Front Squat

    T2 – Supinated Barbell Row

    T3 – RDL to Shrug Pull

    PC – Single Leg Hip Bridge

    PS – “Y” Raise

     

    Session U

    T1 – Overhead Press

    T2 – Clean Grip Snatch from Knee

    T3 – Split Squat

    PC – Russian Leans

    PS – “A” Raise

     

    Most of the athletes work is still done in the movement prep, Lunge Progressions, Core Work, Land/Jump Mechanics, Upper Body Gymnastics

  • #31121

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    I am slightly confused by the question. Are we speaking about reaction time in reference to doing reactive type drills?  We have done the majority of reaction drills in our agility stations on our lateral speed sessions.  We have done the infamous mirror dodge and wave drill repeatedly.  We have also included drills where we have the athlete face away from the drill and place objects in different patterns that they must pick up randomnly and place in a bucket at the start line.  I prefer this type of drill because it is make sthe athlete choose the pattern he will complete the drill and decide on strategy to win.  The mirror dodge and wave drill, although you are reacting to a stimulus you still know the basic patterns that are going to be done.  Same at the old star drill.

     

    The problem I see with these drills are they still don’t factor in the randomnous and the movement that occur in game situations.  Sport secific practice and competition are the best places to hone reaction skills. Football is the toughest sport because you cannot practice it year round.  I believe that 7-on-7 has help reactability of the Front 7 Level 2 and Outside the Box athletes.

     

    In the strength sessions one exercise we used to work on reaction ability and starting strength are cadenced block cleans.  We have also utilized stop and go single leg jumping movements also.

  • #31102

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    I think this is a great topic to get everyone to post on.

     

    As for programming, my knowledge doesn’t compare to Coach Cash and House’s but I’ll give my 2 cents for what it’s worth.  

     

    My programming has really been influenced heavily by House.  The tier system is something that I not only beleive in but is something I feel is perfect for athlete physical preparation.  I believe each sport poses a different situation when it comes to Block Zero because of the length of time we have with them during their developmental period.  For instance, my main sports at Georgetown University are Men’s Lacrosse, Men’s Soccer and Volleyball.  Both Men’s Soccer and Volleyball are currently in their competitive season so I can really lengthen the Block Zero programming for the freshmen and literally slow cook the athletes on a “low” setting.  The progressions are slow and the lengthy season allows me to reap the well dry in terms of simplictiy for the freshmen athlete.  For the Men’s Lacrosse team, things are a bit different. We began the developmental period during their “Fall Ball”, so the Block Zero will be 4 weeks long with the 4th week as a evaluation period.  In this instance, Men’s Lacrosse is slow cooked at a “high” setting.  We progress them but the progressions are a bit more time sensitive.

     

    That being said, here was the first cycle for the Men’s Lacrosse freshmen:

     

    Session T

    T1 – Clean from Block Progression [Cadence to Position with “Go” as the execution of the lift – Wk1 – Clean Pull, Wk2 – Clean Pull + Clean, Wk3 –  Clean from Block]

    T2 – Goblet Squat [3-sec Down, 2-Sec Pause, 1-Sec Up]

    T3 – NG Chin-Up

    T4 – BB RDL + Shrug

    PS – Y-Raise

    PC – Cook Hip Lift

     

    Session L

    T1 – Front Squat Progression [1-Bodyweight Squat, 2-Hands Free, 3-Front Squat]

    T2 – OH Press w/ Plate Bent-Over Row

    T3 – Hang Clean Pull

    T4 – Goblet Split Squat

    PS – T-Raise

    PC – Partner Leg Curl

     

    Session U

    T1 – Bench Press w/ Band Pull-Apart

    T2 – Trap Bar DL

    T3 – RFE Goble Split Squat

    T4 – Push-Up w/ SA DB Row

    PS – Y-Raise

    PC – Plate/KB Waiters Bow

     

  • #31122

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     I may be wrong but I think he might be referring to the reactive ability for the muscle to relax and contract which Dr. Verkhoshansky trained using Depth Jumps.  I’m only guessing from his reference to Special Strength Training. If this is so, Depth Jumps and other advanced methods of plyometrics are great but need to administered at the right time.  

     

    With a proper progression such as the one Mike Boyle has made popular, you could easily get an athlete to sart using more reactive methods of plyometrics. But also utilizing a jumping progression that goes from sticking landings to more land and move type drills can be as effective.  I think the main reason why we might not see them as much is because today’s athlete lacks relative strength which really needs to be dealt with before diving into reactive methods of training.

     

  • #31123

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     What I’m referring to is along the lines of the forces dealt with in sport, and the ability for the tendons to absorb that force, along with the nervous system/brain’s ability to get your feet in the proper position faster.  This was more of a question for those who are later in life, and have the strength they need.  In some of my older trainees who focus on strength too much, the real issue is that their non-contact injuries come from tendons/ligaments not being prepared for the pounding of running/jumping/cutting/etc.

     

    House’s comment leads me down another path however.  The athletes that play 7 on 7 or their sport develop their abilities as specifically as possible, which of course makes common sense.  And we all know that the forces on ligaments and tendons, when playing a sport far exceed that of what’s seen in the weight room.  And that’s kind of what I’m getting at.  Should more time be spent mimicing these forces with jumps/sprints, etc, such that one is more prepared for it?  OR is there simply a limit as to how much of that an athlete’s body can take, and you need to minimize the use of such to a maintenance level, and let the high levels of that be reserved for the season.  Will emphasizing reactivity and game speed force production prepare athletes for such, or simply wear out tendons faster?

     

  • #31124

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     In regards to paragraph 1, I would be on a similar page as Coach Tolzman, teach them 1st how to land with basic jump mechanics and then stick and hold jumps.

     

    Paragraph 2 is the on going question that I ask in all the attributes we attempt to improve.  I have personally favored implementing jumps and throws as alternatives to the Olympic Lift variations in higher level athletes during strength sessions.

     

    Word’s Win

    COACH KENN

  • #31125

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    We are continuing to clean up our site to better serve our registered users and most importantly our portal members.  We are creating a three tiered access to information site.  More will be discussed in a upcoming blog post and member newsletter sometime next week.  We are very serious about improving our portal members experience.  As noted before, we beleive that starts with the forum and Coach Kenn’s consistent availability to our members.  We feel this is the most important item we can give our portal members, direct access to coach.  The forum is the best way to do that. Coach Kenn also  would like more interaction with other members posting responses to questions asked.  This develops relationships and camaraderie between members and stimulated thought!

     

    Also, we have created a Portal Member Library tab. This will be where we upload new inforamtion, articles and presentations specifically to portal members.  Your membership type will determine what information will be available to you. We will always inform the membership where and when new information is uploaded especially when we add programs and ebooks to the specific Professional and Parent Portal pages.  We will also date material so members can recognize new material faster.

     

    Coach Kenn has uploaded one of over a dozen raw footage video clips from a 2009 presentation on Power Clean Technique.  You can find it in our new Portal Member Library Tab.  More segments will be uploaded over the upcoming weeks.  This will not be edited and were taken with a Flip Camera

     

    Thank You for the Support.

    WORD’S WIN

    BHP STAFF

  • #31126

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    House,

     

    I’ve seen/heard the interview with Coach Mckeefery a couple times and you mentioned cycling for a little bit in the interview and I thought it would be a great topic to speak on because there is a lot of confusion to it when it comes to the Tier System.  I mentioned that that cycles that were provided in the first edition of Coaches Strength Training Playbook will not be included in the second edition.  I’ve personally used those cycles while I headed a private company and saw great results from them but have now moved predominately to Prilepin regulated cycles.  

     

    In the interview you spoke on how you really only use VAT [Volume Accumulation Training] and Prilepin regulated cycles when it comes to programming.  I was wondering if you could elaborate more on the topic, how you set developmental programs up and how you would utilize these methods with both high school and collegiate athletes.  I know in other interviews you spoke about how you would really used the VAT for the majoirty of a high school athletes career but I just wanted to get all your ideas centralized to one forum topic.  

     

    I’m looking forward to your response.

     

    Tolzman 

  • #31096

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    [QUOTE]We also do multiple movements within Tiers 1-3.  Upper Body Tiers primarily will always be Pull/Push supersets, Lower Body Tiers could include a prehab/mobility movement and now include a Stabilization movement for the Power Zone (core), and the Total Body Tiers could include a jump and now include a Rotational movement for the Power Zone.”[/QUOTE]

     

    By “could include”, are you stating that you are doing a medley of sorts in Tiers 1-3 as well?  For example, would a lower tier be a Squat variant complexed with the core stabilization movement?  Or do you mean that the lower tier is only consisting of that stabilization movement you referenced.  I know in the first edition, it was stated that effort tiers aren’t bracketed, but that was over a decade ago.

     

  • #31097

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    We medley about everything nowadays!  In the upcoming weeks I will do a video post about this specific question because this is what will be in the new design section fo the upcoming book.  Here is a quick tidbit.

     

    Example of a weekly cycle

    5×2 at 80% Work Sets 

    Movement Tier 1 – Front Squat – extra note Strength Speed Complex

     

    The Preparation Progression for this Cycle [what we used to call warm up sets] would look like this

    Prep 1 

    Root – Wtd Plank :30 seconds

    Reset – Bent Knee Seated Band AB/ADDuction x6 each

    Resistance – Front Squat 40% x5-8

    Prep 2 

    Root – Wtd Plank :30 seconds

    Reset – Bent Knee Seated Band AB/ADDuction x6 each

    Resistance – Front Squat 52% x3-5

    Prep 3

    Root – Wtd Plank :30 seconds

    Reset – Bent Knee Seated Band AB/ADDuction x6 each

    Resistance – Front Squat 64% x2-3

    Prep 4

    Root – Wtd Plank :30 seconds

    Reset – Bent Knee Seated Band AB/ADDuction x6 each

    Resistance – Front Squat 72% x1-2

    #31103

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     Let me say first and foremost how happy I am that the website and the Forum are back up and running again.  I have followed coach Kenn since his Boise State days and have been using the Tier System since it first appeard in an NSCA Journal back in the late 90’s.  What I like(d) most about it was that it took a lot of what I was already doing and helped me to give it order and a method.  I felt I was fairly good at keeping this progressing etc., but the Tier System gave me a better was of organizing and being more thoughtful in my programming.  In the last three years I have since taken many things from the Tier Program and added little twists that work better for my situation.   Everything is still based off the Tier System.  I accepted my current position directly out of college and have been a teacher and coach at the same High School for the past 21 years. My volume and intesity prescriptions are almost identical to Coach Cash it sounds like.

     

    The following is a sample of what a typical week may look like.  I apologize if this comes across scattered. I was going to try and post an actual “sheet” and then explain my thoughts but I am not that tech savy.  All our workouts are created using an excel sheet that I made that utilizes drop down menus for exercises based on the Tier and exercise type that I have assigned that location.  This really helps me be able to move things around and be creative in a more efficient manner (at least for me).  I have also used rest times to do Core work and stretch/mobility work.  Here is a sample week set up.  ANYONE please feel free to tear it apart.  I apologize for the length of this post.  Even my students giggle when I start to talk as they know I get pretty ginned up about this stuff.  I have been very fortunate over the years to have some great people take time to work with me on my “craft” and I try really hard to make it the best I can, so again…hammer away!

     

    This is an example where I have doubled up on the Total Body Tier as my first Tier and single exercise in my Series A

     

    Teir Rotations

    T   L   U   Series A

    L   U   U  Series B

    U   T   L    ”   “

    T   L   U   Series C

    L   U   T     ”   “

     

     

     

    Foam Roll, 3-5 Dynamic Movement exercises

    Pre-Activity Prep – (Posterior Chain, Power Zone Stabalization, ISO L.B., Dyn LB, ISO UB, DYN. UP)

     

    Day One                                                                     Day 2                                                        Day 3

     

    Series A                     &#1

  • #31127

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    I predominantly use 3 cycling systems.  The Biggest is based on Prilepin’s Chart.  I have as you know my own version of the original chart that I call th Prilepin Volume Hit Chart.  From this Chart I have established Volume Rules for different levels of athletes. The rules are based on 4 levels.  They manipulate volume and rep ranges of the Hit Chart.  For each specific week of a cycle it has a 2 corresponding scores.  One is based of of the relative intensity charts that are common.  I prefer to call this chart my Performance Zone chart.  The second score is based off a formula created specifically for Prilepin sets and reps schemes by Hristo Hristov.  I call the my Intensity of Effort Score.  I am actually posting this score on my twitter feed for my Olympic based training sessions.

     

    The second cycling system I utilize is one I created at Louisville and the one you saw me training when you visited at Big House Power at Proehlific Park.  This is what I named Volume Accumulation.  This is a flat loaded cycle in which the intensity remains the same for the base, load, and performance week but the volume increases.  For example, week one [base] you may work up to 80% for 5 reps.  On week four [performance] you wil work up to 80% again this time for 8 reps.  This is how I would train my collegiate block zero athletes and this is how I trained my GPP athletes at Proehlific Park.

     

    The third cycling regime I utilize is for Front 7 athletes only and is called submaximal effort training.  It is a 4 week cycle geared to setting a fatigued state training max.  It is utilized for squatting and horizontal pressing movements.  It is based on a 5×5 training session with a waved cycle of chains.

    Week 1 you work up to a 5rm with 2 sets of chains

    Week 2 you work up to a 5rm with 1 set of chains

    Week 3 you work up to a 5rm with 3 sets of chains

    Week 4 you work up to a 5 rm with no chains followed by a 3rm then followed by several singles in possible. 

     

    The only difference between the squat and press is the squat is to a box weeks 1-3.

     

     

     

     

  • #31104

    Coach Cash
    Participant

     Great Stuff. In small college weight rooms and high school weight rooms, we always have to modify. Room setup dictates programming.  We follow a 3 x 3 in out current in-season but I may have kids that squat last because we have to rotate through the Tiers. And due to time, I try to keep the same number of sets on all three tiers–for us it is 6 sets. In the offseason I plan to use one of my old college tricks…I will have three groups all on a different card.  For example…with a large class day 1 can be session T for 1/3 of the class, session L for 1/3 of the class and session U for the last 1/3. I did this at Presbyterian college back in 07-09 and worked great. 

  • #31065

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     Because I’ve already read your book more times than my wife wants to recall, I started reading Dan John’s Easy Strength.  I know this site is about the tier system, and I also don’t like bringing up the mentality of “well this coach does this”, so I’m directing what I’ve gleaned from Easy Strength towards the tier system.  

     

    One glaring differences I see is in the minimalistic approach taken by Dan and Pavel.  I hope someone is familiar with their work, or this is all for naught.  The take away is that strength like speed is a skill that requires complete recovery and frequent exposure with low volume.  I can’t argue with this as I too have been down the path of low volume, high frequency, high intensity, with by far my best strength levels.  With such an approach, more time can be allocated to perfection of sport form.  Or as they like to categorize it 80% of time on sport, 10% on mobility and 10% on weights.  

     

    This got me to thinking and wondering more as to why power capacity has proven to be the driving force behind the tier system?  In direct opposition to this is the stance of Dan and Pavel regarding the feeling achieved from strength training.  They believe it should simply be a primer and you should feel better after a strength session, thus allowing for sport practice.  Whereas I know I’m exhausted after any kind of tier session with sets in the 40-60 range.  

     

    Different ways to skin a cat, yes.   But these viewpoints are almost in complete opposition to one another.  

     

  • #31066

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    I am not super familiar with Pavel’s work, but have read a bunch of Dan John’s work.  Although differences are there we do adhere to his belief of a squat pull push hinge type movements involved in a daily session.  He also include carries.  Again the Tier System is originally based on a 21 set program. Not a Whole lot of work there.  If you develop a program based on Prilepin’s Chart that may move to 30.  When you hear us talk about 50-60+ sets these include Root, Reset, Reactive, and Resistance Movements.  And our Reset movements are mobility in nature.

     

    We like density of work. Power Capacity is a term that we utilize when doing Strength/Speed of Speed/Strength Complex’s.  Or how our athlete’s respond to total body tier’s 2 and 3.

     

     

    We must also remember that if I was training a weightlifter or powerlifter where maximal numbers were the score that counts I would train them totally different than an athlete who has repeats bouts of exercise with minimal and incomplete recovery.  Although I beleive in the 1 rep max, I prefer to cut a athlete off with some room to spare than have them miss a lift.

     

    We practice approximately 7 hours a week and strength train approximately 75 minutes.  In the college ranksit was closer to 9 and 2 hours. 

     

    Have there been times when my guys are spent, yes, but for the most part the majority of our athletes have been extremely respondant.  I believe this is because they are prepared properly and we strength train three days per week for our main sessions.

     

    On a personal note, I train harder and more efficient than I ever have and train at the percentage of my current maxes and rely on my cycling rules and I am very rarely exhausted after a training session.  Sore yes, exhausted no.

     

    I do not personally know who these individuals train.  I have spent almost my entire career training teams.  I believe Coach John has trained some teams, but spends a lot of time working with throwing athletes.  This 80-10-10 sound a lot like a Bonderchuk philosophy.

     

    WORD’S WIN

    Coach Kenn

  • #31105

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     I think it is important to remember the diversity and variability of the individual training sessions when we discuss #tiersystemstrengthtraining.  In a perfect world the weekly training session would be Day 1 – Session T, Day 2 - Session L, Day 3 – Session U [Mon-Wed-Fri/Tue-Thur-Sat].  Your “SPRINT” sessions would be pre strength training on Session’s T and U and your “CONDO” days would be on alternate days.  Session L would no include a “RUN” day.

     

    Nowadays, with the size of major college facilities and some high school’s, you can have enough equipment to perform this rotation easily.  One caveat in this day and age especialy for football are “PRP’s”, player run practices that usually are done on top of your exercise prescription plan.  Most teams runs these on Wednesday’s our Big Squat Session of the week.  This had made many #TSST programers have to adjust session L to Friday’s and make that a non run day.

     

    Also even though I beleive the ideal rotation is TLU, when we started this at BSU in the 1990’s we did not have the room to perform this rotation with the entire team.  So we did what Coach Cash implied, We started different groups on different sessions and rotated them through accordingly.

     

    The whole body concept allows us to do this.  Regardles of what session we are training, the whole body is effected in some fashion simialr to the demands of “sport”.

     

    This is why I am a fan of this system.  It s easily adaptable to many coach’s individual situation.

     

    WORD’s WIN

    COACH KENN

  • #31067

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     HAHAHA……love to be the spark to the fires of passion for you House.  Thanks for the insight.

  • #31098

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     Thanks for the layout, and yes I’m in suspense.  In seeing that and some of the posts on your blog, I’m curious.  Have you shifted away from the use of an actual dynamic lifts in favor of the med ball and jumping work?  If tier 2 were to be the speed emphasis, has that moved back to the original “medium” emphasis?

     

    I’m thinking that the dynamic work is of little value so long as med ball, jump, and sprint work is being done.

  • #31099

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     Yes I am utilizing jumps and throws more often than dynamic effort squats and benches. At the level I am at now, explosiveness is not a trait that my athletes are deficient in. Plus the physical demands at this level are ridonkulous.  These athletes are true phenoms.  Most of our programming is based on developing high levels of sub max effort strength in the lower and total body. Modified max effort in the upper body and keeping size and lean tisue on the athletes. If i was to go back to college, our block 4 programming would look similar to what I am doing now. When I entered the NFL my programming looked extremely similar to my college block 4 programs.

  • #31128

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     Coach,

     

    What are your benchmarks for players “earning the right” to move into the next subsequent blocks of training? Are you looking for particular relative strength/power parameters in the foundational/core lifts?

     

    Thanks,

    Mike

  • #31130

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    House,

     

    You spoke about how you’re utilizing different landmine exercises in some of your Total Body Tiers.  I was wondering if you could let us in on some of the exercises you’ve been using.  

     

    Tolzman 

  • #31129

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    I wish I could tell you there was some break through formula we used.  There is none.  We developed the Block system for college level athletes based on a bell curve mentality.  The majority of our players fell in between 2-3 standard deviations, with outliers on both ends.  Having worked at that level for the majority of my career, I made certain time frames based on the athletes academic calendar.

     

    Block Zero – second semester of summer school through freshman fall semester

     

    Block One – spring semester freshman year – summer school

     

    Block Two – spring semester sophmore year – summer school

     

    Block Three – spring semester junior year – summer school

     

    Block Four – spring semester senior year – summer school

     

    We did not include In Season Program as part of block system after the athletes 1st season with us.  Most of the freshman that did play still went through the Block Zero program during their first season.

     

    If an athlete did not get red shirted he would perform Block One programming through the spring semester and Block Two programming the following summer.

     

    Any outliers whether they were the top or bottom end as with all of the athletes, individual differences were evaluated and specific areas of development were programmed with our blitz programs.

     

    Coach Kenn

  • #31131

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Nothing groundbreaking, I can tell you that.  We do primarily lifts to rotation work from the ground and rotation movements from the hang position.  On occasion we may include lumber jack squats to press, but the majority of the time we want to include rotation with our land mine movements

    Coach Kenn

  • #31133

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Coach Rashad Roberts of Pine Crest Prepraratory School has written an interesting article on his perspective on Block Zero training. I am very much interested in our members comments.  Coach Roberts played for me at Louisville and has worked 2 years with me in the NFL.  Pine Crest was my first coaching job and Rashad has been doing a terrific job since joining the Panthers.  I am interested to see how others feel of his basic progression.  I have a couple of questions, one in particular that I will post at a later time.

     

    Thanks for the Support

    WORD’S WIN

    Coach Kenn

  • #31134

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    My first questions I have after reading this information several times for Coach Roberts is:

    Do you have a preliminary programm that is done before this specific 5 week block?  Specifically, do you implement a block of training before this where there is only bodyweight and movement (field) work?

  • #31135

    Coach Rashad
    Participant

    That is a great question! When it comes to implementation prior to the first basic 5 week cycle, I like to follow the forum similar to that of FMS or functional movement screening. The programming in prep starts with basic landing fundamentals which progresses to jumping. Something I have heard and learned through my years of coaching is that no matter the age, all athletes must learn how to ABSORB force before APPLYING it. This goes hand in hand with stabilization of the core as mentioned in the article. We must acknowledge the weaknesses before adding to the strengths. And this prep can last anywhere from 1-2 weeks before implementation of the 5 week block.

  • #31136

    Coach Cash
    Participant

    Question…

     

    In your five week progression example, you start with external loading in week 2 or three.  Can you clarify (re-emhpasize) the need for patience in regards to external loading?  And you start you teaching progressions for the main movements how?

  • #31137

    Coach Rashad
    Participant

    Coach Cash:

    – When it comes to the external loading, you will find that some of your athletes will progress more rapid then others. As for a general time frame to input external loads, you cannot put an emphasis on the first 2-3 weeks of the training as some may be ready in two weeks and others in three. The need for “patience” in regards to external loading is vital. External loading should come as reward for coaches and athletes alike. We can always apply volume over load. We have all heard the saying “quality over quantity”, and this is definitely a place for that as we progress our athletes.

    -Teaching progressions for main movements depends on what movements we are looking to accomplish. Main movements for my athletes consist of bench press, squat, and deadlift. The functionality of these lifts have basically started with day one with the emphasis of stabilization. Over the duration of the 5 week block I look for mobility and stability of the athletes. Remember the more mobility and stability your athlete has, the stronger he/she becomes with the chance of injury being decreased. Not in any way am I saying they will not get injured, but the risk is a lot lower. My athletes go through a fairly long phase of a lunge/hip progression, bodyweight squat progression, push-up progression, and band rows (various forms). This allows me to put an emphasis on what we would like to accomplish leading up to the incorporating main lifts we want to accomplish.

  • #31106

    Coach Rashad
    Participant

    Coach Cash that is a great point. We must have a goal in mind when challenged with space for room setup. Now, the issue that came up when I started my job here at Pine Crest was the variety of athletes and general population being meshed together into one training session/class. We have since found a way to accomplish the task at hand. But for the coach that may have this issue, how would you program for the general population of kids while making sure you are accomodating more for the athletes that are serious about accomplishing goals for their respective sport?

     

    Coach Rashad

    Pine Crest School

    Fort Lauderdale, FL

  • #31138

    Coach Cash
    Participant

    How do you determine if an athlete is ready to progress?  It takes me a little bit longer to progress to the incorporation of lifts.  I have usually gone through a 6 week Block Zero cycle with college freshmen.  At the high school level or middle school level, I am currently working through an eight week cycle (two four week cycles) as opposed to six.   Our first 4 weeks consists of athletic position holds, isometric holds–lunges, squats, ching hangs, pushups, etc. and a ton of bodyweight exercises for volume.  Second cycle is more of the same but we had variation through tempo and pauses.  I understand there will be variation from athlete to athlete but I haven’t found an athlete here that is ready to jump in that fast.  For me I have been messing around with setting up some parameters for moving forward.  For example…to progress to the platform and begin our deadlift progression an athlete has to be able to do a few things:

     

    • Complete 5 standing long jumps at the end of a training session
    • With the jumps we are looking for a few things
    1. When powering down, ensure proper athletic position
    2. When powering down, ensure knees are out
    3. When jumping, ensure knees are out
    4. When landing, ensure knees don’t buckle
    5. When landing, ensure proper athletic position

    If an athlete can’t do these things, I don’t let them move forward to deadlift progressions.  And I usually wait until the 5th or 6th week before we evaluate.  You could also use an altitude drop w/ stick landing to vertical jump with stick landing to evaluate.  Just some thoughts. 

     

     

  • #31107

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     I may sound over simplistic, but if I were in a class situation I would split the class into 2 groups.  One would be performanced based and one would be fitness based. Performanced based group would all my athletes, fitness based non athletes. I would develop a circuit session for the fitness based group and athletic based strength program for the performance group made up of athletes.

     

    Coach Kenn

  • #31108

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     I am fortunate enough to have started an Athletic Sport Performance class which has grown to two sections. However there are several kids who can’t fit it into their schedule. For those kids, I give them the same workout that they would get in the other class while the vast majority of the students are working in a more general lifting program focusing on general fitness.  Currently we are four weeks in and next week the non athlete kids are testing BW general strength along with testing our technical models in hang cleans, back squat, TBDL, and bench. Right now the athletes in the class are junior and senior kids and have been lifting consistently for several years so they have moved into their first phase already. After this coming week I will continue on lifting days to have separate workouts for those groups as well as a remediated program to bring up to snuff those students who did not pass the technical model test and/or just have low BW relative strength. It’s kind of a pain but in the end it serves each student and athlete right in their wheel house and provides great results and a positive environment. 

     

    Chris Mattingly

    Lake Stevens High School

    Lake Stevens, Washington

  • #31139

    Coach Rashad
    Participant

    I use very similar parameters to progressing my athletes. Core, athletic positioning, landing, and jumping are all prioritized starting with day one. Prior to platform/rack incorporated lifts there are strict movements and progressions that I follow to ensure the athletes are ready. The cycle you are using has a ton of merit to it! Remember we have to know what type of athletes we are working with. I’m also in the clear of understanding that the multitude of athletes of this age group are not ready to be on a fast track to performing major lifts. Maybe one out of every eight of my athletes are on a more rapid progression.  In order for athletes to move on to platform/rack incorporated lifts they must do each of the following with bodyweight: squats, lunges, and pushups. While performing the exercises I MUST see:

     

    1. ISOMETRICS – to enable stability of the athlete’s body (i.e. push up hold)
    2. ECCENTRICS – to have full control holistically, as many athletes might have control of one limb and not of the trunk or an opposing limb (i.e. lowering in a reverse lunge)
    3. CONCENTRICS – to ensure that the athlete can activate and fire all muscle groups properly without compensation (i.e. standing up or jumping from an athletic postion)

    When I have been convinced that the athlete can do these three consistent enough to avoid injury with all movements that are being asked of them , then I will be able to progress them.  I still live by the motto “slow and steady” at this point of training as many will rush through this phase thinking they are not working the athlete enough. We can always add volume above loading.

     

    As for the jumps, I definitely have incorporated the depth drop to vertical jump, not just implemented for my athletes but have used them in my past personal training cycles as well. I even progress to depth drop to box jump with a stick landing. I implement a variety of this in my offseason basketball and volleyball cycles. Thank you for your knowledge and questions retaining to the article.

     

     

     

  • #31132

    Coach Caufield
    Participant

     Similar to Coach Kenn the majority of the exercises that we use landmines for (at the NSCA headquarters) is from the ground and/or rotation, but I’ve also been playing around with rowing variations (check out Dave Tate/EliteFTS for videos).  It’s something different and to add variety,

     

     

  • #31109

    CoachSwieton
    Participant

    I?m in a unique situation at Murray State University where I only work with the Football program and I have all but three freshmen separated from the rest of the team. I learned a long time ago from a Coach much smarter than me that you have to treat incoming athletes as if they have never touched a weight before. House talks about it all the time, there training age is zero when they enter your program because they?ve never been in your program.  The following eight week block in what our current freshmen will finish Friday. Due to our fall camp practice schedule I was lucky enough to run a three week no weight on the bar Block Zero Program with all the freshmen(which I run almost identical to House?s, but with more of an Overhead Squat Emphasis, but that?s another article). We still continue with a ton of Block Zero elements in addition to this lifting. The first four week block is for establishing 5RM for our T1 and some T2 exercises.  The second four week block I introduce my version of Volume Accumulation.

    Aug 26th 2013-Sept 20th 2013

    After Pre-Activity Preparation

    Session T

    T1 – Hex Bar Deadlift

              On Floor Core

    T2 ? Goblet Squat

              Double

  • #31110

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    This is a solid Block Zero Training template.  Great info for all of us.  Where is your overhead squat work placed in your programmning?

    Coach Kenn

  • #31140

    tyler10p
    Participant

    Coach,

  • #31111

    CoachSwieton
    Participant

    House,

    To be perfectly honest, I follow the Block Zero program you have listed on the site almost verbatim. However, this past February, I had the opportunity to hear Jim Radcliffe (Head Strength Coach at Oregon) speak. He said that he started out all of his incoming athletes with an Overhead Squat, then a Front Squat, then finally the Back Squat. His main reason was the posture aspect. Someone brought up ?what if they don?t possess the shoulder, hip, or ankle mobility to perform the Overhead Squat. He said that they work through it, starting with a PVC pipe super wide grip if need be, and work on mobility from there. They don?t progress to Front Squat until they have mastered Overhead Squats, same thing with Back Squat. That made a lot of sense to me, so in our non-weight on the bar segment of Block Zero, we alternate Isometric Overhead Squat and Counterbalance Squats. If Day One, Quarter Two is Isometric Overhead Squat and Quarter Three is Counterbalance Squat then Day Two, Quarter Two is Isometric Counterbalance Squat and Quarter Three is Overhead Squat. We just alternate for the reminder of that block. After that we use the PVC Pipe Overhead Squat as part of our Pre-Activity Prep on Session L. I hope that makes sense to everyone.

  • #31112

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    To all Coaches, 

     

    Did you guys use the same template for Block Zero for all sports other than football as well?  Just trying to see if there was any variation of Block Zero for spring sports whose Developmental period is already limited in time due to the fact that the majority of the team is away during the Summer and Winter breaks and Pre-Season starts when they report back in January.  

     

    I’m really enjoying this thread…a lot of great information here.

     

    Thanks, 

     

    Chris Tolzman

  • #31142

    mbooth
    Member

    Guys tell me what you think about the following workouts. I have put this together for what I call developmental players in our high school football program (Junior Varsity kids).  I am putting this out there because I am not sure if I have butchered the integrity of the tier system or not.  It is normal for me to couple a main tier lift with other smaller exercises (super/tri set). Our kids work in groups of three and I call the workout on the whistle.  Here is an example of a Monday lift.

     

    Dynamic Warm-up

    OH Squats

    Box Jumps

     

    Tier#1           

    Power Clean

    Abs

    Posterior Shoulder           

     

    Tier #2

    Front Box Squat

    Spot

    Gripper and Neck

     

    Tier #3

    Grip 2 Bench

    Spot

    Posterior Chain Lift

     

    Finish with a Pull ?up routine/stretch

     

    My question is this. Does the integrity of the system get messed up by including Tier #4 and #5 exercises with Tiers 1-3?

     

    The other question I had was whether or not I am doing too much on the Tuesday/Thursday workouts. Those are days that I call running days, but really they are pre-hab, SIDs, agility, metabolic days.

     

    #31113

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     The Academic Calendar is not friendly for the Collegiate or High School Coach regardless of sport.  The one thing I would say about spring sports, is this, They are not physically as violent as football. And most of these sports are absolutely movement based, therefore Block Zero principles can be applied in any programming situation.  How much is based on level of athlete.  One of my colleagues who will be writing for us in the future, Ethan Banning, I beleive will be discussing this in his take on Block Zero influences on any level of athlete.

  • #31114

    Coach Cash
    Participant

    During my college coaching years, I used the first month and a half to two month in the fall as Block Zero for spring sports.  Especially baseball kids…they are more speicalized as a sport than any other sport and need as much functional athletic work as possible!  There will always have to be a starting point when you come into a new situation.  But once your kids go through block zero, they move forward every year and you will have only one group in block zero from that point forward.  

     

    As far as template design…when starting with Block Zero, one of the main goals is to teach athletic position and progress to athletic movement/athletic based strength training.  So as long as you are training athletes…all templates could be close in design.  

  • #31141

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    My rest times have varied based on many different factors over the years.  I am now a big believer in DENSITY of work, but understand the need for some type of recovery if and when I ask my guys to “ramp it up”.  My “Rest Sequences” are two fold.  During our preparation progression sets, the athlete’s rest between the major movement is filled with accessory movements that we feel will benefit the athlete’s focus and function when performing their work sets.  When the athlete enters “WORK SET” time with the exception of complex work, the athlete’s rest in partner based.  We generally train 3 to a group and with our tempo we can get through a set of work fairly quickly.  When we ramp it up I may give them some more time. It must be noted that I beleive in max strength with incomplete rest, even in the weight room with my athletes (exception, sprinters, jumpers, and throwers in track and field who get complete rest between single bouts of exercise).  Most other athletes have to display their power/strength capacity when performing their sport with incomplete rest between bouts of exercise, so I like to train with that in mind when looking at rest intervals.

     

    Coach Kenn

  • #31143

    Coach Cash
    Participant

    It is important to remember that all rooms are different.  Time and space dictate a lot in program design.  There is not always a wrong way to do things…especially if your kids have bought into it!  As far as integrity of the Tier System, the underlying principle is athletic based strength training–Total Body Movements, Lower Body Movements, and Upper Body Movements with a 3 Day Total Body Training Sessions.  Use it as a guide as opposed to strict protocols

     

    I do the same thing…just an example…

     

    T1–Power Clean–5,3,2 4×4

           Warm Up paired w/ Rotational Core

           Working Sets paired w/ Plyo–Low impact usually no more than 3 or 4 Reps

    T2–Tempo Box Squat–8×3

           First 4 Sets–Stability Core

           Last 4 Sets–Posterior Work

    T3–Incline–5,3, 4×6

           Warm Up paired w/ Posterior Shoulder

           Working Sets paire w/ Horizontal Pull  

     

    As far as T-TH, there are no issues with doing some extra work or House calls them BLITZ packages.  Great day to get posterior work, corrective work and perhaps some outside the box training.  Just keep in mind your training for the next day and don’t crush what lies ahead.

  • #31144

    mbooth
    Member

    Coach Cash,

     

    When do you fit in your prehab exercises such as neck, wrist, knee, ankle, etc..  Do you believe those are areas that only need to be done twice a week on your T-Th workouts as corrective exercise? 

     

    I will sometimes hit the neck and wrists everyday but in different angles.  My neck work for instance might be weighted on M-W-F, but manual of T-TH.  That is one area in the sport of football that I want to say I did  everything I could to prepare the kid for contact. At the end of every season I get with the athletic training and take a look at our injury list from the prior season.  Based on that I prioritize what I need to do a better job of strengthening.

     

    I like what you said about don’t crush what lies ahead. Thanks.

  • #31145

    Coach Cash
    Participant

    We usually do manual neck as part of our warm up.  I do a lot of body weight work or block zero exercises with my main lifts.  I also believe that we have to pick and choose sometimes as far as what we can get in.  Sometimes it’s hard to get everything in.  I like to pick what we need to be good at and build from there.  If we can’t power clean, squat, pullups, lunge, etc. then some of the auxilliary stuff is worthless. 

  • #31092

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     I meant to clarify this, but forgot.  What I was referring to is the example on this site for Block IV athletes and I believe it’s in the 2009 example.  Rather than each tier having a different emphasis for the day, as is done with daily concurrent, all tiers have the same emphasis for the day.  E.g.  Meaning that Monday is dynamic for all 3 tiers, Wed is Strength for all, and Fri is Volume for all tiers.  I only saw that example in the 2009 programming and hadn’t seen it elsewhere.  Is that what you mean by “true concurrent”?  Each day is one particular trait for the entire body?

     

  • #31093

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     True Concurrent – would be variation of tiers for Blcoks 3-4 compared to 1-2 being volume or a strength priority. You are correct the 2009 program was the only time I did a concurrent weekly series rather than a daily sequence.  I was trying something new.  We had pretty good responses.  Problem was we got fired and I was never able to build on that programming thought!

     

    Coach Kenn

  • #31146

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     

    #31147

    mbooth
    Member

    Coach,

     

    By VAT are you referring to a form of linear periodization.  I remember you breifly talking about this at a Hammer Strength clinic, and saw you referred to it in a recent post. I am just trying to get some clarification on the true meaning of the term.  I briefly skimmed through past posts to find a definition or explaination  but still have some confusion on the term. Also, is this something you would use for an entire block of training ( saw where you mentioned high school athletes), a cycle, a certain  tier, or all of the above?

     

  • #31151

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Coaches,

    Curious on any feedback you may have on this program design. Background: Work with military population, athlete is proficient in our foundational lifts and has good strength levels relative to the population. Correctives/Mobility work are based off of deficiencies identified. As a staff, we’ve recently committed to the Tier System. Work in progress. 

     

    Session T:

    T1a. Clean

    T1b. Foam Roll Post Delt

    T1c. Side Plank 2.0

     

    T2a. Front Squat

    T2b. Sumo Squat Hold

    T2c. Ab Wheel

     

    T3a. BB Row

    T3b. T-Spine Extension

    T3c. DB Bench Press

     

    T4. Farmer?s Walk (thoughts on a loaded carry here?)

    T5. Single Leg Squat (Unsupported)

     

    PC. DB RDL

    N. Stability Ball Iso Flexion/Extension

    PS. DB YTWL Raise

     

    Session L:

     

    T1a. Back Squat

    T1b. ½ Kneeling Ankle Mobility

    T1c. Front Plank 2.0

     

    #31155

    tcobb52
    Participant

    Does anyone have any articles or pointers on how to use excel to create the workout cards

  • #31148

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    VAT or Volume Accumulation Trainng is a cyclical based program that I developed while at Louisville, looking at different loading parameters for myself. VAT is based on the premise of flat loading the intensity/load of a cycle while increasing the volume each week.  The primary goal was to increase training session DENSITY by increasing the volume without increasing training time.  For the veteran lifter (OLD) this is extremely hard to do.  Is this a form a linear periodization?, I guess so, never thought of it in those terms.

     

    A sample of a VAT cycle looks like this:

    Cycle – VAT 568

    Week 1 40%/5, 52/5, 64/5, 72/5, 80/5

    Week 2 40%/6, 52/6, 64/6, 72/6, 80/6

    Week 3 40%/3, 52/3, 64/3

    Week 4 40%/8, 52/8, 64/8, 72/8, 80/8

     

    Yes, I would and have used this for an entire block of training for every tier and this would be my primary cyclical choice for HS athletes with the exception being cleans.

     

    WORD’S WIN

    Coach Kenn

  • #31152

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     We appreciate you working with our military personel.  They allow us to live our dream everyday.  With that being said, similar to another coach’s question in regards to pairing movements and the tier system, you must create rules per tier.  What movements is some form of justification fit in with the major movements of the Tier.  This is th ebiggest implementation of movements and evolution the TSST has made in the last year.  This will be a mjor focal point in our new book.  What you need to evaluate is what RESET and ROOT movements are best implemented with in the specific Tier Movement Catergory. Ask do things correlate with one another?

     

    Word’s WIn

    Coach Kenn

  • #31156

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Articles, no. Pointers, simple start with your margins, draw out on paper what you want it to look like and then boarder and shape boxes to look like the drawing.  That is pretty much what I did for 5 years before finally getting to our template today. If needed you then work on formula’s to set percentages etc.  I had very basic hyperlinks to start beofr eI had someone build in macro’s etc.  I learned two years ago how to add simple drop down marco’s from Coach Klein at UM.  Speaking of that, I need to go refresh on how to do that!

     

    WORD’S WIN

    Coach Kenn

  • #31157

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     Coaches,

     

    I thought it would be a great topic to expand on. What do you like to do, don’t like to do, do you use training maxes, etc. I’m really looking forward to hearing from everyone.

     

    Tolzman

  • #31158

    Msnyder
    Participant

     I am in a high school setting, we generally have available Monday thru Saturday for practice/training with Sundays always being off.

     

    As most of you do I’m sure, I let practice take the main role. After 2+ hrs. out of on the field I keep in season session at a max of 35min. We train 3 days a week. Monday, Thursday and Saturdays. I’d prefer to lift the guys Wed. instead of Thursday, but the Head Coach wants thursday, so I give him Thursday. 

     

    I have high numbers so I split the groups by Big Skill and Small Skill. Once the season starts I do not introduce new movements to the guys. I will do some vaiations on some movements, but nothing new. New movements generally induce some sort of soreness in my experience and they are sore enough from the sport itself. I do not need to contribute any more to that. Monday is when I squat my S.S. guys. I want thier legs to be fresh come Friday night with the running we ask of them so i get it out of the way early. The B.S. kids get their squat on Thursday. 

     

    I use training maxes (typically 90% of actual max) based off their final summer testing numbers and i keep that constant for the duration of the season. If a player asks me to jump up his weights because he feels like it is becoming too easy I will do that. I will also manipulate the training max on a few of my B.S. kids who I consider big squatters at the high school level because of the game the next night. For these guys I may drop it another 5-10%, especially if they are a starter. 

     

    On our Session U days my T2 movement is a Pull from the Deck. We get away from catching as we start the season but still emphasize the triple extension and shrug at the top. 

     

    We also do a lot of DB variations in all sessions as it allows for more modifications if a kid has something banged up.

     

    Saturday mornings after games we do foam rolling and body weight work. If they aren’t feeling too beat up I allow them to get some extra light bench work done in place of push ups to keep them happy. High school boys love their bench press and I don’t program it in enough for their tastes.

     

    Look forward to other’s thoughts on the topics. 

  • #31162

    tcobb52
    Participant

    Coaches,

     

    In programming lifts such as the OH Press, Incline, Power Shrug/Power Pull, how do you determine the lifters max on each particular lift. Do you use a percentage of your fundamental lifts as there max or do you do a rep max with each specific lift. Also, I would like to hear what y’all do for mental toughness/team building drills.

  • #31115

    CoachSwieton
    Participant

    I?m a fan of this thread so I?m going to continue to post on it. We just finished our third four week cycle of Block Zero. I thought I would post it to get peoples thoughts/ opinions.

     

    Oct 21st 2013-November 15th 2013

    After Pre-Activity Preparation

    Session T

    T1 – Hex Bar Deadlift

              On Floor Core

    T2 ? Back Squat

              Double Leg Jump Variation

    T3 ? Horizontal Pull

    #31159

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    We utilize a 2 day approach with our 53 Active and a 3 day approach with our Practice Squad.

     

    53

    We are primarily use a Medley Based Tier System Rotation during the season.  This helps with conditioning, tempo, and time.  For the first half of the Season we utilize 2 Tier System based training sessions.  When we reach med season we utilize a 15 station circuit on Monday’s.  Wednesday is Session U.  We do use percentages as a land mark with an open ended set for upper body movements.  Total Body and Lower Body movements are pre set.

     

    Our Practice Squad gets after it.  The are on a New version of a 3×5 rotation. Let’s Call it Tier System 5.0. Will get deeper into this for  our membership as the chaprters are written as well as the presentation slides for the upcomng seminar/certification.  We utilize a Session L,U,T Monday, Wednesday, Saturday rotation. This is based on practice volume and time. Saturday’s Session T is a big day. Tier 2 Lower Body Movement is this groups Foundation Movement for this category.  So we do 2 Foundation movements on Saturday.  The fourth session is Thursday – Conditioning with our MMA group. 

     

    I will expand on this post to specific add on questions

     

    Word’s Win

    Coach Kenn

  • #31160

    CoachSwieton
    Participant

    There was an article posted on elitefts a few weeks ago about In-season Football Strength Training. Someone mentioned that they used a Gain (didn?t play), Retain (played some), and Recover (played a lot). Which I thought was a great idea. In my current situation when our Travel guys come in to lift I give them a range that they have to be in (i.e. somewhere between 65%-75%)for the big lifts Deadlifts, Cleans, Squats, Presses,  it gives them some freedom in their workout and I believe it allowed us to stay strong throughout the in-season.  Obviously the ranges and reps change throughout the season. If a guy is really beat up pick the low end range, if he?s feeling great pick the high end. I tend to stay between 55%-80% in-season and only go above that if it?s a guy that doesn?t play a ton.  I?m not married to the idea and still tweaking it to find the best way.

     

  • #31163

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    OH Press is a Block Zero and Block One “Foundation” Movement for th Upper Body so early on in our athletes career with us he will set a 5RM, 3RM and 1RM in the exercise that will carry through until we move to dumbbell/kettlebell movements

     

    Incline, we use a standard range of 79-82 percent If we do not set a repetition maximum.  Percent is based off Bench Press RM.

     

    Power Shrug is different than a Power Pull for us. Power Shrug would be 120% of Deck Clean – We set a 3RM for the Power Pull in our program in Block Zero and One when building our teaching progression to the Deck Clean, Power Pulls are huge in our programming.

     

    The old Mental Toughness question.  I have a problem with that term that may Jay Bilas’ book “TOUGHNESS” may shed some light on.  I build mental strength, discipline, fortitude, resiliency, etc with “OTS” (off the script sets) competitive situations and earlybird training sessions. In the end to me toughness is no different that any physical trait …. in college and pro’s recruit it!

     

    Words Win

    Coach Kenn

  • #31153

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Coach,

     

    Saw your Facebook post about the release of your new book. Excited about that. Do you talk about your 8Rs and the RESET and ROOT movements within the Tier movement categories as well?

     

    Thanks,

    Mike

  • #31154

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Yes we will and I will be presenting on this at the ELite Athlete Development Seminar with Mike Roberston March 28-29 in Indy 2014 as well as our 1st Tier System Strength Training Symposium and Certification weekend summer of 2014

  • #31161

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    I skimmed that article and liked how it was planned as far as the groupings.  We had our Top group which was top 44, squad groups special teamers and scouts, and our freshman group

  • #31116

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    What are you utilizinf for load over head? Dowel, PVC, Barbell Standard, Barbell Light, Kettleballs, Dumbbells

  • #31117

    CoachSwieton
    Participant

    With the load I usually start them with an unloaded barbell the first time we do it. If they demonstrate proficiency with the barbell they are allowed to move up, but I’ve never had anyone go over 95lbs. With the front squat grip I usually start them off 65lbs, obviously I never want to sacrifice form for technique especially with the young guys.

  • #31164

    Msnyder
    Participant

     How would you all go about implementing a [4×5] rotation?

     

    Our head coach  wants us going M,T,Th,F for the first two months of the off-season before switching to a [3×5] day rotation in March. In previous years I’ve gone to more of a Upper/Lower split for this time frame as I haven’t came up with a way that I think would effectively get the job done. I find myself repeating similar movements on back to back days (one of the reasons [4×5] isn’t used anymore) and it gets to a point of diminishing returns in some cases. 

     

    This is one of those situations where the boss gets what he wants so any insight will be helpful. Thanks!

  • #31165

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Coach,

    You may have not downloaded the Athgletic BAsed Strength Training ebook from the Professional Portal ebook library, but on page 82 it describes a 4×5 model I used in 1996 with the Boise State Broncos.  After reviewing this info, if you need any questions answered continue on this thread.  I hope this helps.

     

    WORD’S WIN

    Coach Kenn

  • #31166

    Greg
    Participant

    We are in the process of putting together and implementing the tier system for next semester in our sports performance class at our high school. We have four, 4 week cycles next semester before we will max in May. Being new to the tier system we are trying to follow it closely. One of our questions is with our age group what type of training cycle would you suggest? We were looking at using the traditional developmental strength cycle in the ebook starting on pg. 168. Our kids have been lifting 1-3 years on average and have a decent base but need to get better technically. We will have to be in groups of 4 or 5, we have 96 kids and have 20 stations. Its not ideal but we have to make it work and keep it simple. We will have 65 minutes from the time we take roll to release them to shower. Lots of variables and were working through the details. Back to the question of using developmental or VAT or mixing in one while sticking with the other? We wil also have 3 cycles in the summer before our first football game so getting a handle on the training cycles is something were not sure of.

  • #31181

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     I’m hoping that latest blog is a typo.  Is the new ebook coming out tomorrow?  Or is it really 2014?

  • #31182

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     

  • #31183

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    BEAUTIFUL!  Consider this my pre-order form!

  • #31167

    Coach Cash
    Participant

    Do you have the ability to split your class in half?  Do you have any other coaches in the room with you?  IF you do, you could always have one half working plyos, change of direction, linear speed, etc. and the other half lift….and then switch. 

     

    As far as where to start…I would definitely use a traditional cycle.  I don’t know if at the high school leve we will ever need to use anything else.  If you have 16 weeks, I would suggest breaking into two separate 8 week cycles (w/ two 4 week cyles for each 8 weeks).  This way you have to max weeks with more chance for improvement. 

     

    Hope this helps.

     

    Coach Cash

     

     

  • #31184

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     And……begin.

  • #31168

    Greg
    Participant

     Thanks Coach Cash! We will be implementing the groups, tiers, rotations etc. our racks are double sides so we will have 5 to a group and work throughout the tiers in a 3×5. We will implement speed work on T/Th. We have a lot of details to work through this week. Do you mind if I send you an email with our plans for your feedback? I got the new ebook Saturday and had the coaching strength training playbook before I purchased the membership to this portal. I liked Coach Kenn when I listened to a podcast and had never heard of him before. I look forward to learning the system.

     

  • #31118

    Coach Cash
    Participant

    What about load for Overhead Step Ups and Overhead Reverse Lunges?

     

    A lot of good stuff on here for sure. This setup for us would actually be closer to a block one program. My orginial thoughts are a lot of variation and you are covering all you tier principles. For us, I would not use overhead lunges or overhead step ups with weight until Block Two.  We hammer rep after rep with regular lunges and step ups with variations–w/ knee drive, tempo, toe drag, dead leg, etc.  Once they have mastered those we move forward.  You are right about posture and its importance…you could try three points of contact monster walks and pause squats.  Hope this helps.

     

     

  • #31169

    Coach Cash
    Participant

    Absolutely.  Shot you a message with my email.  I will help anyway I can.

  • #31170

    Coach Rashad
    Participant

    Coach Cash I have a question as well. We recently got rid of some extra help here in our weight room, for help in other areas of the school. My question is what is your intake or insight on maintaining a high production rate of athletes in the strength class that is mixed with students of the general population that don’t take it nearly as serious? I still have to maintain a balance of interest of athletes and general pop alike. Clearly they are not in the same state of mind when it comes to the importance of weight training.

     

    Coach Rashad

  • #31171

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    I wish I had that many weeks to train my guys! I beleive Coach Cash and Coach Rashad are involved with this thread and they are in the HS trenches like yourself so hopefully they will give you some great feedback. I beleive with the time frame and amount of athletes I would develop a simple but effective pre activity prep program that all athletes can do at one time and then stick to a traditional 3×3 template.  Get you big work done.  If there is time to spare I would hit some finishers. One day Upper Back Shoulders, One day Lower Body extra’s, One day Torso/Core.  The VAT is not in print. I would stick to traditional but in the first 8 weeks keep the cycles light as you yourself has said exercise technique needs work.  I sure don’t care what you guys lift if it doesn’t look good technically.  Remember the goal is transfereable strength. A jumping jack reverse curl clean does not transfer to athletics etc etc etc!

     

    Good Skill

    Word’s Win

    Coach House

  • #31185

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Coaches,

     

    I know classifying groups of a football team has been widely talked about in the recent years and it seems that it’s almost a norm among most football programs to have different classes of athletes that require different training means/methods.  My question is in regards to the Olympic Sport side of our profession and why hasn’t this idea caught on to the training of other teams.  I was wondering is it a waste of time to classify these teams and/or if anyone has had any experience in having doing this on the Olympic Sports side.  It would only make sense to me to have a heirarchy of training because many of these athletes are at different levels of relative strength.  But I was trying to get everyone’s opinion on this subject.

     

    Thanks,

     

    Tolzman 

  • #31186

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    First off, a Block Zero program in a no brainer for all incoming freshman. Especially the female athlete. It may be her first time ever in a weight room.  After that it gets interesting. I say this because most of the Olympic Sports numbers are not as high as FB, the exceptions being track and field and swimming.  I have also heard crew is a high participation sport, one that I have never worked with.  I do think there is a need for this with any team. I would say that at this point in my career you could really do great work individually with Oly sport athletes in their “Block 3 and 4” years because of numbers.  With the way we are constructing programs now on this level, I would be very interested to see how I would right a program fo a junior/senior volleyball or basketball player. Much different than I did, I promise you that! This should be a good thread for discussion. I will stop here and wait and see who joins in.  Great thread Chris!

     

     

  • #31172

    Greg
    Participant

    Coach Big House

     

    Thank you for your input and for sharing. This is awesome! I really enjoy having a place to go to learn and grow.

     

    Greg

  • #31173

    Coach Cash
    Participant

    Coach Rashad,

     

    I wish I had a great response for dealing with regular students.  I guess I am a little spoiled in that I have only athletes.  However, I may be able to offer some solutions…

     

    1)  Go to your administration if the students are a problem or distraction in class.  Our administration here will put them in ISS for the day or the period.

    2)  If they aren’t dressing out, call parents.  Most parents don’t want kids to fail PE

    3)  If there are no discipline or distraction concerns, you could always try and set up a few types of workouts.  Simple circuit training for the students who don’t like to train.  If you have a meathead or two set up a bodybuilding plan. And then have your athlete daily training session.

     

    Don’t know if that helps, but those are some of my first thoughts. 

  • #31174

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Greg, this has been a goal of ours for the forum. In the past I did a poor job of interacting and the forum did not have much traffic.  With the help of others we now have some dialogue and am hoping more people become involved with our membership line and interact within the forum.

     

    Word’s Win

    Coach Kenn

  • #31175

    Coach Rashad
    Participant

    Coach Cash,

     

    I have taken your advice and started the implementation of a plan. We are on our holiday break right now, so this is giving me time to program more individual based workouts for the gen pop. I have incorporated simple circuits for the non trainees, but will have to consider dummying them down even more without the extra eyes here with me.

     

    I do not really have any trouble with kids, it is just more so keeping the ones interested that have to have the class as an elective. But this will definitely be beneficail moving forward. Appreciate it!

  • #31176

    Msnyder
    Participant

     Rashad,

     

    I’m in a similar situation and I have implented what has been talked about above with some success. The one hang up that I encounter is when I am working with the athletes, the kids who are in the weight room because they have to be get off task. I don’t know remember if it has been brought up or not, but I am going to put the non-athlete’s workouts on a sheet and have them record their progress. I’m hoping it will keep them on task a little better with the end result being them actually seeing their progress. Good luck buddy!

  • #31177

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Msnyder,

    My simplest recommendation is to develop a 10-15 station circuit mostly bodyweight exercises, jump rope, etc put them on times sets and rest and have them track how many reps they can acheive in each work interval. Keep an eye on the group and when you find a “leader” have him/her oversee the circuit while you coach them from the athletic group if you see a technique issue or a discipline issue.

    Hope this helps

    WORDS WIN

    Coach House

  • #31178

    Msnyder
    Participant

     It does Coach. Thanks for what you do!

  • #31179

    Coach Rashad
    Participant

    Msnyder,
    I have implemented a ton of the information provided, and they have worked wonders for this first week back to school. I am interested to see how the kids progress. Some of the most disruptive kids even participated and competed by recording his reps and comparing to other students. So, I definitely appreciate the input from you and Coach Kenn. By the way if you need a timer,there is a boxer timer online and it’s a free and easy way to have intervals set for the students to compete between sets.

    Keep Improving,
    Rashad

  • #31149

    mbooth
    Member

    Coach,

     

    Is there some place where I could find a progression of VAT cycles, or is this just someting you put together by trial and error.  Did you include these in your first book?

     

    Thanks

  • #31188

    mholst
    Participant

     I am a HS Strength coach and due to our school schedule during this portion of the year, we have a handful of four-day weeks. This means that two of our sessions must be done without a day of rest in between. Currently, I am using a 3×3 program for the main portion of our lifting.

     

    Because of this, I moved from TLU, LUT and UTL days to TLU, LTL and UUT days.

     

    Has anyone run into this problem? How did you fix it? Is this an appopriate way to play with the base template? I realize I’m probably sacrificing a little on the second upper and lower body exercises on Session L and Session U.

     

    Thanks for your help.

  • #31189

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Coach,

    1st Order of business, never break the integrity of the training template as it relates to the daily sessions of the movement category rotation.  You manipulate the movement choice rather than the category rotation.

     

    When we developed out training microcycle for our high school general phycial preparation classes at Big House Power Competitive Athletic Training @ Proehlific Park and here at the professional level we developed a plan that was based on a Monday thru Thursday work week. Therefore we also had to do back to back training sessions.  Our model was as follows;

    Monday – Session T – rotation Total, Lower, Upper

    Wednesday – Session L – rotation Lower, Upper, Total

    Thursday – Session U – rotation Upper, Total, Lower

     

    Now this is where you expertise and experience comes into play as it relates to cycling and exercise choice. For example, Let’s look at Upper Body Rotation, in particular, Wednesday and Thursday.  What we do and what i would recommend is Tier 2 Upper Body should be a paired vertical push pull and Tier 1 Upper Body should be a horizontal push pull. Your beliefs in exercise choice would determine which are the best for this type of rotation.  For Lower Body I recommend especially at the high school level is the Tier 3 Lower Body movement be a single leg bodyweight variation (pistol squat).

     

    This should give you and idea as to how you should put your thoughts on paper. It is a tremendous process and forces you to evaluate which exercises/movements really matter and which are just fluff and filler.

     

    Great question.   Hope this helps

     

    Word’s Win

    Coach HOUSE

  • #31190

    mholst
    Participant

     Thanks for the quick reply!

     

    I assume you don’t believe that the Tier 2 Vertical Press during Session L will negatively effect the Tier 1 Horizontal Press during the following day’s Session U?

  • #31191

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Great Follow Up!

     

    1 – No I do not and I do not care (very scientific huh) - I don’t mind if my athletes have a little fatigue because most athletes need to perform at high levels under fatigue and duress.

     

    2 – This is where your experience as a coach comes in. You have to properly choose exercises and cycling that can benefit the athlete.  At the high school level I was predominately volumes based and did not 1-3 rm my athletes.  At the professional level we fatigue test most of our movements and we have not seen any issues of doing this rotation back to back.

     

    Coach House

  • #31192

    tyler10p
    Participant

    Coach,

     

    If an athelete gets injured (i.e shoulder or knee) what is your protocol if movements are difficult? Do you have them rest completely with the risk of getting out of shape or do you have them perform rehab movements on the injured limb and working movements on the others?

     

    Thank you

  • #31150

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    This was started out as a way for me to increase workload without increasing load while I was working at Louisville and evolved into VAT training when I was in the private sector and then I tightened it up while in the professional ranks with tremendous success.  The individuals I sent the VAT cycle to for a test drive had similar improvements in overall LBM and strength.  No it was not in the first book, I ”created” in inadvertently in 2008-9. It will be in the second.

  • #31193

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    General Rule of thumb for is …. Train the everything you can with the excpetion to the injured area/limb.  This is not as easy if it is a low back issue. Have the proper medical/physio experts dictate the protocals for the injured area.

  • #31194

    mholst
    Participant

     Coach,

     

    How do you load someone when they can’t hold a dumbbell or barbell? We had a player break both of his hands this season, at the same time.

     

    Our facility only has free weights (half racks, dumbbells, barbells, benches).

  • #31195

    Msnyder
    Participant

     mholst,

    Do you have any belts that you could attach weights to? If so you can hang the weight between their legs and have them squat that way. Belt Squat. I’ve used this in the past with athletes who had various upper body injuries. Hope this helps.

     

    Here is an example of what I mean. youtu.be/PldcPTOACm4

  • #31196

    mholst
    Participant

     We don’t have belts we can attach weight to, but I will look into it now! How simple! Never thought of that before. We have vests, but you’re limited to a lot less weight with those. 

  • #31197

    tyler10p
    Participant

    Coach,

     

    Are you at all worried about muscle imbalances when fully recoverd? For example if an athelete dislocates his left shoulder and does single arm DB bench with only the right arm for the recovery period.

  • #31199

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Coaches,

     

    There is a ton of information regarding periodization/scheduling the training for teams who have only one competition a week/month (Football, Swimming, Track & Field) but there really isn’t much regarding what coaches like to do for those teams who compete twice a week.  I was wondering what you guys like to do for those teams who compete more than once a week and how you guys like to structure the training load for the team.

     

    Looking forward to the replys,

     

    Tolzman 

  • #31202

    cdavidson8457
    Participant

     Big House,

     

    We recently had a head coach change and he wants us to switch from the Tier System to a four day a week Upper/Lower emphasis. We had a lot of success with the system and I am having trouble trying to get a plan together for the upper/lower days. Any advice I would greatly appreciate it.

     

    Thanks

  • #31180

    Coach Cash
    Participant

    The App Seconds Pro is a great timer!!!  You can set up any way you want!

  • #31198

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    As I am not a PT or specialize in expertise research on this topic. I have been told be those I repsect with greater knowledge on this subject than I have, that there is a benifit to training opposing limb during injury.  It actually has shown to help increase strength gains in the injured limb and at a faster rate when the athlete is cleared to perform resistance training activity. 

     

    Personally, in 1985-86 when I had major ACL/MCL reconstruction, yes back them they repaired the mcl also, I performed numerous single leg leg presses with the uninjured limb and I beleive it had tremendous value in my recovery.

     

    Hope this helps

     

    Word’s Win

    Coach Kenn

  • #31200

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Sorry for delayed response, I thought I replied before leaving for Pro Bowl.  This is one of the most difficult situations out there in strength and conditioning program design.  I remember working with basketball back in the day and that was a nightmare.  They biggest help is if the multiple competitions fall on the same days of the week.  I can’t remember exactly, but I believe one basketball season the majority of games once they began conference were Thursday and Saturday.  This is a bonus because if you have the coach’s support you may be able to get at least one great training sessions, or 2 mini sessions, or a combination of each.

     

    The biggest factor is Head Coach support and you must have several different plans ready to go depending on weekly schedule.  There is no periodized work. It should all be based on playing times and intensity of game.  I promise you there will be weeks when you won’t see you team.  Remember, do not take you frustrations out on the athletes. It’s not there fault.  It’s the way it is.  As always remember “We have to be the adaptable (and smartest) coaches in the building”, be ready for all situations, even is some athletes want to train on game day!

     

    In the end, talk to you athletes and work out the best training scenario possible without taking fuel away from competition days.

     

    Word’s Win

    Coach Kenn

  • #31203

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Tough break, is he allowing you input into how to run his practices? Sorry, had to say it.  This is a tough scnenario as some old school coaches are stuck on the upper/lower split.  My advice would be to have Lower days be your total and lower body movements and your upper days be split with a horizontal emphasis one session and a vertical emphasis the second.

     

    Tough for me to recommend four day work as you can understand.

     

    Please follow up so we can help create a great program for your athletes.

     

    Word’s Win

    Coach Kenn

  • #31187

    Coach Cash
    Participant

    I agree with House and have implemented Block Zero with Olympic Sports.  I believe that progressing to Block 3 or Block 4 would have to be a team by team or on an individual basis.  Reason being in my experience with sports like Volleyball, Girls Basketball, Soccer, and to an extent Basketball, most of these athletes first experience a weight room at the college level.  While with football, baseball, and track there is usually some knowledge or experience.  I always started my freshmen off at Block Zero, but a strong freshmen that completes Block Zero can progress quicker through the remaining Blocks.  So I guess my response is again it depends on the level of the team or the athlete.  Hope this makes sense.

  • #31201

    Coach Cash
    Participant

    Lets say Basketball…Plays on Tuesdays and Fridays

     

    Monday–Session L

    Tier 1–Goblet Squat w/ Stability Core (6 Sets)

    Tier 2a–Push Press w/ complementing pull (4 Sets)

    Tier 2b–Upper Post w/ Lower Post (2 Sets)

    Tier 3–KB Swings or varying KB Movement w/ Rotational Core (6 Sets)

     

    Wednesday–Session T

    Tier 1–Hang Clean w/ Rotational Core (6 Sets)

    Tier 2–Pause Front Squat to Box w/ Stability Core (6 Sets)

    Tier 3–Bench Press w/ complementing pull (6 Sets)

     

    Monday is our lighter day as it is the day before a game.  I still try to follow the Tier Template but again stressing lighter loads.  Wednesday is our heavy day.  The kids have two days to recover before their next game. 

  • #31204

    cdavidson8457
    Participant

     I have had some input on the lifts that we do during the workouts. The way we work right now is that half the group is outside running while the half of the kids lift. They switch halfway through the workout. Our time frame is:

     

    5 min dynamic warm-up

    5 min core, P/C

    24 min/24 min weight room/ running, med balls, and mat drills

    Here is a look at what we have set up in the weight room:

     

    MONDAY Set 1 WT Reps Set 2 WT Reps Set 3 WT Reps Set 4 WT
  • #31205

    Coach Rashad
    Participant

    Cdavidson8457,

     

                       I really like what you created for your guys! I have recently came across this same issue with one of our coaches at our institution. The success

     

    that the Tier System has brought for my guys here show for itself. So, there is no reason at all to change what has been implemented. But from what Coach

     

    Kenn responded with is what I decided to go with, putting the Total/Lower days together. And considering that my athletes here at the high school level are still

     

    majority Block Zero kids, they will continue to see the gains without a ton of supplemental work. It can become a little frustrating. But for me, this allows me to test

     

    my coaching skills of how well I can adapt to what is being thrown at me. The knowledge and information on this site always keeps the wheels turning for me!

     

    Great forum to continue building on, because I’m sure there are a lot of coach who also have come across this same challenge.

     

    Thanks for starting this one,

     

    Coach Rashad

  • #31206

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Coach,

    If I could my recommendation would be to place the Total Body movement on the Upper Days 1st as with Monday’s work out – Power Clean followed by Front Squat is a much better sequence when those two exercises are involved.

    Coach Kenn

  • #31207

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Coach,

     

    I noticed in the Coaches Strength Training Playbook For Football that deadlifts do not show up until Block IV.  I also noticed that you used deadlift technique work with your block 0 athletes.  Am I correct in assuming that the deadlift work with block 0 is used to develop the proper position for the clean and the power pull?  Do you then wait with the deadlift until the athlete is more developed to help prevent injury or because of a higher priority on the clean and its varients?

     

    I teach and coach at the high school level and use deadlifts on a regular basis.  I do so because I have found that it seems to help the athletes develop a feel for a neutral lumbar position that is needed in the squat and the clean.  I also use it because most of my male athletes want to put on size and deadlifts seem to really help in that regard. 

     

    I can’t help but wonder if I should rethink the use of deadlift or if I should keep it as a tier 3 exercise only.

     

    Any input would be great.

     

    Greg Johnson

  • #31208

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     Greg,

    My deadlift progression changed dramatically since the year of this program.  I am a huge deadlift fan at the hogh school evel, if it is taught correctly and not overloaded where the athlete’s technical efficiency is poor.  In my block zero program, we started our ahletes with a high handle hex bar deadlift.  We chose this exercise because most beginners/freshman lacked the hip and ankle mobility ot get in the proper starting position of a conventional clean grip deadlift stance.  Instead of not developing strength while improving mobility we felt this movement gave us the best bang for our buck.  We then proceeded to transition to a standard straight bar deadlift.  This became our foundation total body movmement for Block 1 athletes at Louisville as well as our number 1 building block to deck cleans.  So yes you are correct in that we used this to help develop proper starting position for those two movements.  It was also a stand alone. We tested this for 3-5 rm maximums with reset reps.  Reset reps means we allowed them to drop the weight from the thighs after they completed the rep.  We did not need the to lower the bar to the ground between reps for our programming protocals.  In our eBook Push Jump Punch, It shows you exact ptogrsamming on how we built the clean progression from Block Zero to Block 1.  We actually did not do any deadlifting with Block 4 athletes.  We do program hex bar deadlifts into our programming here at the professional level with our active 53 as well as our rookie program and practice squad.  In the high school level I would consider keeping the deadlift in your programming.  Just be mindful of load and technical efficiency.

    Word’s Win

    Coach Kenn

  • #31209

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Coach,

     

    Thanks for the quick response.  I have also found the use of the High handle hex bar to be benificial for our athletes with poor mobility.  We usually end up about 50/50 with those who can use the straight bar. 

     

    We have always made our athletes hang on to the bar to the floor until the last rep of the set.  I think I will rethink my stance on that…especially when we are above 80% relative intensity.

     

    Thanks Again,

    Greg

  • #31213

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Anyone from the forum going to Indianapolis next month for the seminar?

     

    Mike

  • #31214

    Msnyder
    Participant

     I will be there.

     

    Mike

  • #31215

    Coach Rashad
    Participant

    I will be there as well.

     

    Rashad

  • #31218

    bloodhound
    Participant

    I am a high school strength coach. I have put block zero in for our rising 9th graders. The high school athletes have been doing mark ripptoes Starting Strength, with great results. I am teaching 5 basic lifts and trying to get really good at them,along with body wt asst movements. Once they stop progressing on the program we move them to another phase with a few more movement to keep progress going. I am trying to keep it simple,but I am getting confused on weather I should kepp doing this or move to a block sytem? any help would be a big help.

  • #31219

    cdavidson8457
    Participant

    We stayed at block 0 for 4 weeks with my athletes. After evaluating our athletes, we seperated our kids into groups that would stay block 0 and those that would move on into block 1. We then had a coach that took the block 0’s to one part of the weight room while the rest of the athletes began on the general conditioning cycle. It worked well for us and now those athletes have progressed into block 1.

  • #31216

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    I will be there also! HAHA. If you are attending and have specific questions make sure you bring them up at the end of the session QandA

    Coach Kenn

  • #31217

    fred eaves
    Participant

    Looking forward to it!

     

    Fred Eaves

  • #31210

    Msnyder
    Participant

     Coach,

     

    How did you adjust the loads from the High Handle DL to the C.G. DL? Did you drop them a certain %, leave them the same or just take new 3-5RMs with the C.G. DL?

     

    Thanks!

  • #31211

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Great Question! After we maxed with the High Handle, We reduced the training percentage 10% for the start of the CGDL. After the cycle was compelted we performed a RM for the CGDL. Remember we allowed our athletes to release at the completion of each rep, reset and begin next rep.

    Word’s Win

    Coach Kenn

  • #31221

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Forum,

    I uploaded a video from my days at BHP private sector on jump training. Looking for feedback and discussion. I hope all of you receive our newsletter. Not going to lie, I know we have some members on this forum that I though for sure would have some thoughts.

    Thanks and Word’s Win

    Coach Kenn

  • #31225

    rmeeks001
    Member

     UIL in Texas only allows us to be able to work with our players in the summer Monday-Thursday, S&C Only. How would you recommend the 3×5 structure. Monday, Tuesday, Thursday – Monday, Wednesday, Thursday – etc.

  • #31226

    Coach Cash
    Participant

    Monday Tuesday Thursday (Rotation #1) or Monday Wednesday Thursday (Rotation #2) will work

     

    You just have to modify a little. In #1 Thursday would be Session T.  In #2 Monday would be Session T.  The other days can be total body training sessions as well, but you have to account for not having a days rest between.

     

    This is an example

     

    Rotation #2

    Monday (T)                                                                                                

    Linear Speed First                                                                                          

    T1–Power Clean/Rotational Core                                                           

    T2–Front Squat/Stability Core                                                                  

    T3–OH Press/Vertical Pull     &amp

  • #31227

    rmeeks001
    Member

     Thank You

  • #31228

    rmeeks001
    Member

     One more question while I am at it – We are alotted 2 hours each day. Would you recommend staying with the 3×5 or 3×7 tier?

  • #31212

    Msnyder
    Participant

     Thanks!

  • #31229

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    We train on a 4 day weekly model also – Monday through Thursday

    Monday Linear Speed – Session T

    Tuesday – Conditioning and Blitz Packages

    Wednesay – Explosive Development - Session L

    Thursday – Lateral Speed/Secondary Conditioning if necessary - Session U

     

    You will need to be smart and evaluate how you back to back your Lower and Total body work on Wed/Thurs. I recommend for Upper body – vertical press/pull Tier 2 Wed and horizontal press/pull Tier 1 Thursday.

     

    Stay with 3×5 invest in movement work!

     

    Word’s Win

    Coach Kenn

  • #31232

    mholst
    Participant

     I would say only if he is significantly weaker in other areas. You might want to look and see if his power output matches his strength output. If not, he may benefit from exercises that aren’t so focused on building “strength”.

  • #31234

    Msnyder
    Participant

     Coaches,

     

    I am in the process of updating my facility and we are taking bids on installing a new floor. PLAE is the hot name out there right now and we have them coming in to our place next week. Does anyone have any experience with these guys? I’d like to hear both the good and the bad about them. 

     

    Thanks!

  • #31231

    Msnyder
    Participant

     At what point do you think a player is strong enough?

     

    I ask because I have a high school rising senior who weighs 200lbs and he hit a 2x bodyweight squat in our recent 5RM testing. His depth was proper and his form was solid. Should I consider modifying his sessions since he is already a very strong athlete. 

  • #31222

    Coach Cash
    Participant

    Meant to post earlier….

     

    The video is great for jump mechanics instruction.  We are currently progressing through Block Zero and started our jump training this week.  And again we are doing similar things.

     

    Forum…I think Coach Kenn would appreciate some dialouge on some outside the box topics.  If you don’t usually implement any of the block zero ideas, try to expand your training protocols and jump in on the discussion.  If you have any outisde the box or ideas that are outside the norm post them and let’s get some conversation going. 

     

     Coach Cash

  • #31233

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     This question will be asked until the end of time when it is specifically related to athletes! I agree with mholst in looking at other bio motor abilities.  I will say this, I never worried if a high school athlete was strong enough. I do not believe they are at a training age from a specific physical preparation standpoint to determine how good a player they are.  We trained everything we could to get stronger. Any movement we prescribed was to continue to get stronger.  If his squat is so much ahead of his other measurables, I would emphasize those measurable over the squat as mholst had suggested.  As always everything should have prescribed testing protocals and the movement is done when the athlete reaches technical failure rather then physical fatigue.

    Coach Kenn

    “You want to get bigger, get stronger. You want to get faster, get stronger. You want to further protect you body armour, get stronger”

  • #31235

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Big House Power is a huge advocate of Plae flooring. We have it in our home facility in Clemmons and The Panthers Facility.  Extremely durable and very “Sturdy” compared to the other cmpanies I have had with similar products.  Hopefully yuou are meeting with either, Rich Gray, Dave Turner, or the Owner of the Plae, Brett Waits.  If so, please mention to them that you are a member of our site.  These guys are great.

    Coach Kenn

  • #31236

    Msnyder
    Participant

     Dave is my guy over there. Great guy to work with! Thanks for the feedback on them. It goes before the budget committee next week and if it’s approved they should be putting PLAE down this summer. 

     

    Dave also said he will be in attendance for the seminar in Indy. 

  • #31239

    Msnyder
    Participant

     Coach,

    First let me say great interview with about the implementation of Block Zero in the middle school programs. I have a question about one of the obstacles I may face in doing something similar to you. 

     

    Was it ever looked at, or even considered, as an advantage for Dorman in terms of getting kids to attend the high school (recruiting)? I’m at an all boys Catholic school which draws many of its students from the catholic grade school system. Our students do not have to attend our school based off where they live. They choose. Like you, we get second semester 8th graders to come and participate in the program, but this is our first official contact with them. Outside of various camps we are not permitted to be in front of potential students in a strictly athletics capacity.  Did you encounter any difficulties from neighboring schools when you were getting things started? If so, how did you work thru them?

  • #31223

    Msnyder
    Participant

     Great video.

     

    We are currently going over landing mechanics at the end of our warmups. The athletes have not been utilizing their arms aggressivley enough upon droping to the athletic position. I am going to add in the cue of “Hammer Down”. The low altitude jumps will be incoporated today to the group as whole. 

     

    When getting to the reactive jumps and tucks jumps, is that something you’d reccommend doing with the group at the end of our warmups like we are doing now or should i look at putting them in to Tiers 4 and 5 on a more individual basis?

     

     

  • #31224

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     Coach,

    I am not sure what level of athlete you are working with so I will answer it this way. I highly recommend when dealing with High School athletes and Middle School athletes utilizing what I call concentrated efforts.  By this I mean, each specific category is done as a stand alone. I recommend that jump[landing] training be done as a specific block within the training session for this level. If you are working with higher level athletes, Tier 4 and 5 total body tier’s is definately and option.

    Word’s Win

    Coach Kenn

  • #31240

    Coach Rashad
    Participant

    Coach Cash,

    Let me start by saying we all appreciate the informative interview! I also have a question. I am currently in the process of presenting to my AD a mock periodization program( five 4-week mesocycles). But I have came across the issue of knowing what parameters to have when it comes to our middle school program, considering that I have a limited amount of assistance. How would you go about implementing rules of who can do the program and when they are elgible to start? Especially since I know there will be a lot of qustions and confusion of who is elgible for starting the program.  Unlike you and Msnyder, I am elgible to have contact with athletes from as early as 6th grade. As of now the program is for the incoming 8th graders starting the summer before their 9th grade academic year starts.

  • #31241

    Coach Cash
    Participant

    We are a public school.  And the majority of schools around that we compete with are public schools.   The biggest recruiting factor was face is Byrnes High School and the amount of winning they have.  Kids and parents natually want to go where they believe they will have the best opportunity to get a scholarship.  I have not encountered any issues so far, but I am sure some will arise.  My advice would be to gain support from admin and parents in your plan.  If admin and coaches help sell your program as the “best thing since sliced bread” kids and parents will buy in.  Hope this helps!

  • #31242

    Coach Cash
    Participant

    Coach Rashad,

     

    I am like you and I have full access to all 6th and 7th graders.  Determining who is elgible to start is all about “where” you want to start.  If you want to start with athletic position and body weight exercises, then you can start in the 6th grade.  Is there any availability for a small supplement for a young energetic coach?    

     

    How many feeder middle schools do you have?  We have three and I have one guy that rotates between all three.  When we started this January, most of our teams were in spring seasons and our fall olympic sports are really heavy in club season.  And in the fall, our spring sports are usually playing some type of travel ball.  So we currently have only football kids lifting.  But the goal is to incorporate more!  Especially during the summer when there is more time during the day.  Last summer I opened Fridays up to all 7th and 8th graders and most of the athletes that showed up were baseball and lacrosse with a few softball girls mixed in. 

     

    Not sure I answered the question…but keep the dialogue flowing and we will get it figured out

  • #31243

    Coach Rashad
    Participant

    Thanks for the quick response. I probably need to be a little more specific in my questioning. I have the starting position of the program set from a lifting standpoint. My question should have been who (athletes/gen-pop) is elgible from a committment standpoint? Because clearly I am going to have general population kids wanting to get involved because their friends are going to be involved, but surely will not come in with a serious work attitude. And being in a position where I will not be able to deny access immediately to kids that will not be taking it serious, I am kind of stuck on where to draw the line.

     

    As for assistance, we do not have an available position open. If I were to have a position open for help this would not be such an issue. So, this is solely on me to make things happen at this point and I am determined to make it work. Considering what kids that are going to be involved is determined on the feeder schools as well. I have two feeder schools, with one of them that has guaranteed kids progressing to the high school and the other with a few other choices of high schools surrounding them.

     

    I hope this response is more specific. Thanks in advance.

  • #31244

    Coach Cash
    Participant

    I guess I am in a unique situation here.  I do not deal with any general population students.  But i would think the kids that are there for the wrong reasons will weed themselves out. 

     

    If you are having to cover all this yourself, I would try to keep it as simple as possible.  I would focus on rising 9th graders and up.  Perhaps with some good luck the word will spread and you can have the opportunity to get involved with the middle schools.  Perhaps during the summer or on the weekends offer a camp or some type for 6th-8th graders.  Could also be an opportunity to make a few extra bucks.  Hope this helps!

  • #31245

    Coach Rashad
    Participant

    Perfect, this makes a ton of sense. Putting together a less extensive plan will help me out a lot. As time goes by I am hopeful that those who do not have the work ethic to be around will drop off and weed themselves out. And as for the summer camps, there is a plan in place.

     

    Thanks Coach Cash

  • #31246

    Coach Lim
    Participant

     Does anyone have a copy of a high school annual plan I can see.  I started my own so I can do a better job in planning and preparing for all sport teams.  This is what I have so far, so anything that could help me create a detailed plan would be great.  

     

    Thanks.  

  • #31237

    fred eaves
    Participant

     Rich and Dave are the best in the business. I would never do business with anyone else!

  • #31238

    fred eaves
    Participant

     Rich and Dave are the best in the business. I would never do business with anyone else!

  • #31247

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Was there supposed to be a link to a chart for this post.

  • #31252

    mholst
    Participant

     I wanted to outline my training for this period of the year for our HS Block 2 (or what we call “Purple”) athletes and get some feedback. These athletes have finished a Block 0 progression as well as our Block 1 period (think of Starting Strength mixed in with the Tier System template).

     

    Session T

    1. Major Total Lift (Power Clean 6×3 60%-80%)

    2a. Bilateral Knee Dominant (Front Squat 5×6 55-65%)

    2b. Manual Resistance 4-way Neck (4×10)

    3a. Unilateral Vertical Push (DB Overhead Press 4×8)

    3b. Bilateral Vertical Pull (Pullups 4×10)

    4a. Bilateral Hip Dominant (RDL 3×10)

    4b. Posterior Shoulder (T Raise 3×10) 

     

    Session L

    1. Major Lower Lift (Back Squat 6×5, 6×3, 6×5/3/1, 6×10/8/6 40%-95%)

    2a. Bilateral Horizontal Push (Close Grip Bench Press 5×6)

    2b. Bilateral Horizontal Pull (Bent Over Row 5×8)

    3a. Unilateral Total Push (DB Push Press 4×4)

    3b. Manual Resistance 4-way Neck (4×10)

    4a. Unilateral Hip Dominant (1-leg Hip Thrusts 3×10)

    4b. Posterior Shoulder (Scarecrows 3×10)

     

    Session U

    1. Major Upper Lift (Bench Press 6×5, 6×3, 6×5/3/1, 6×10/8/6 40%-95%)

    2a. Bilateral Total Pull (Hang Clean 5×3)

    2b. Manual Resistance 4-way Neck (4×10)

    3. Unilateral Knee Dominant (Bulgarian Split Squats 4x8e)

    4a. Bilateral Hip Dominant (Partner Leg Curls 3×10)

    4b. Posterior Shoulder (Y Raise 3×10)

     

    This template will stay consistent for 4 weeks. All exercises outside of the #1 exercise of the day are progressed linearly. The #1 exercise of the day is waved with intensity increasing for the first three weeks and backed off on week #4. Once 4 weeks are over, the rotation of movements will change and we will change exercises based on this rotation. Our Major lift always stays the same.

     

    For example, during Session L, the second exercise of the session was a Bilateral Horizontal Push/BIlateral Horizontal Pull superset. In the next 4 weeks, this will change to a Bilateral Vertical Push and a Bilateral Vertical Pull superset. On the other end, our Unilateral Vertical Push/Vertical Pull superset was done on #3 in Session T. That will now change to a Unilateral Horizontal Push/Pull superset.

     

    Outside of this, we do our warm-up, core, speed/agility, plyometrics and grip training as a group.

     

    Thanks for the feedback.

  • #31220

    mholst
    Participant

    [QUOTE]cdavidson8457 wrote

    We stayed at block 0 for 4 weeks with my athletes. After evaluating our athletes, we seperated our kids into groups that would stay block 0 and those that would move on into block 1. We then had a coach that took the block 0’s to one part of the weight room while the rest of the athletes began on the general conditioning cycle. It worked well for us and now those athletes have progressed into block 1.

    [/QUOTE]

     

    This is very similar to what I do.

     

    We have the kids “test” out of Block 0 after the first 6 weeks. The kids know they’re going to be assessed and work hard to correct technique errors they may have been producing during earlier sessions. Once those 6 weeks are over we move players to Block 1 or keep them at Block 0. The players who stay at Block 0 are assessed on a more daily basis. They may move to the next program at anytime once they show competency in movement skills and technique.

  • #31248

    mholst
    Participant

     

    Football 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
    #31249

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Coach MHOLST

    Question - Can you give us a brief summary and your In Season cycling? I am curious to see how you incorporate your base week, are you varying exercises per cycles, how heavy you are going on 2nd Load week, and you volume reduction for your DeLoad weeks. Also, do you alter these weeks if you have a Major Competition that week, ie Rivalry Game, Conference Game, or Out of Conference game against a dominant program? Thanks

     

    Word’s Win

    Coach Kenn

  • #31250

    mholst
    Participant

     We do not vary exercises during our In-Season cycles to avoid becoming sore with new exercises and to keep things simplistic.

     

    We use a 2×3 program (Session U and Session T). I cycle intensity/volume for our foundation lifts and volume for our major lifts. We use a linear progression for all non-foundational lifts during the season. I remove the Posterior Chain and Posterior Shoulder tiers due to time restrictions and place those as Tier 3 during Session U.

     

    In a 4-week cycle, we might go…

     

    Session U

    1a. Bench Press 6×5 (40, 50, 60, 65, 75, 85%), 3×5&3×3 (40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90%), 3×5,&3×5/3/1 (40, 50, 60, 75, 85, 95%), 3×5 (40, 50, 60%)

    1b. Bent Over Row 5×8, 6×8, 6×8, 3×8

    2a. Push Press 4×6, 5×6, 5×6, 3×6

    2b. MR Neck 4×8, 4×10, 4×10, 4×6

    3a. RDL 3×8, 4×8, 4×8, 2×8

    3b. T Raise 3×8, 4×8, 4×8, 2×8

     

    Session T

    1. Power Shrugs 6×5 (40, 50, 60, 65, 75, 85%), 6×3 (40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90%), 6×5/3/1 (40, 50, 60, 75, 85, 95%), 3×5 (40, 50, 60%)

    2a. Back Squat 4×6, 5×6, 5×6, 3×6

    2b. MR Neck 4×8, 4×10, 4×10, 4×6

    3a. DB Incline Bench Press 3×8, 4×8,4×8, 2×8

    3b. Chinups 3×10, 4×10, 4×10, 2×10

     

    Following a 4-week cycle, I will adjust maxes for our Foundation movements and continue to linearly progress on the non-foundational movements.

     

    I try not to alter weeks based on who we are playing because we could play two tough teams to end the season and then go into the playoffs. For me, that would be too many weeks on a deload. In HS, I also don’t like the mindset that we need to be up for some opponents and we can relax against others. I think, in HS, you’re asking for trouble with that outlook. We want to improve every week. With that said, I will alter some days based on player feedback or my own observations on top of dealing with injuries throughout the year.

     

    What do you think? How can I improve this?

     

  • #31251

    Msnyder
    Participant

     We run a very similar setup at my HS. The major difference being we put our Session T as their 1st lift of the week and Session U as their second. Our headcoach likes to lift the day before the game so putting Session T on a Thursday wouldn’t work well for us since we play on Fridays. We also come in the morning after games for some light DB and Bodyweight work. I will adjust maxes in season based off player feedback. Based of their feedback if they are feeling good or if they are feeling rundown I will adjust accordingly. 

     

    I think you are right on with not adjusting based on opponent. While the kids certainly know if a team is a cupcake or if they will be tough opponent I do not think that should change the way the staff approaches training/practice for that particular week. 

  • #31253

    brucemillar
    Participant

     

    Hello Coaches

     

    I recently discovered the Tier System and intend using it with my rugby team next season as I feel it will add more structure to what I’ve done previously.

     
    The off-season programme will be a pretty straightforward traditional 3×5 plan which I won?t bore you with here.
     
    However, I would appreciate some input on my in-season programme as I?m not convinced I?m on the right track or even if I’ve correctly understood the relevant parts of the book!
     
    Gym work is done on Monday and Wednesday nights and conditioning work on Tuesday and Thursday nights ahead of a Saturday game. My plan is to use Elite Cycles on a 2×3 programme with an emphasis on speed. My current thoughts are to go with Session T on Monday so the heavy lower body work gets done early in the week, and Session L on Wednesday. That obviously leaves out Session U as I feel upper body strength (Session L Tier 2) is more important than upper body speed.
     
    The Tier 1 speed exercise would follow the 3 week cycle detailed in the book, while the Tier 2 effort exercise would follow the 10 week rotation of supplemental exercises outlined in the book (i.e. 5 exercises each done for 2 weeks; week 1 working up to a 5RM and week 2 working up to a 3RM). Tier 3 would be done for volume/mobility followed by PC and PS work.
     
    Any comments would be very welcome. Specific questions are as follows:
     
    a) is this anywhere close to sensible?!<
  • #31289

    Jeff Wettschurack
    Participant

    There’s plenty of talk about strength training here, but I think we need to further delve into the world of movement and conditioning.  At least I’d like to, as if you can’t move, react, or are too tired to use that strength, what good is it?  In following the works of Buddy Morris, Charlie Francis, and of course Joe for some time now, while also applying such, I got to thinking about one difference in particular….conditioning.

     

    CNS recovery is and has been a hot topic with regard to strenght/speed athletes.  Many programs are now shifting all hard work to the same day, INCLUDING game situation conditioning, in multiple sessions if needed, such that the off day can be almost completely off.  There might be some skill work and active recovery at most on those off days.  As laid out, the tier system still puts conditioning on alternate days from strength/speed work.  We know it works, and I’m not debating that.  

     

    The conundrum I have is whether all this CNS stuff is a bit overblown, FOR the multi-motor regime athlete?  Yes it’s important, but many athletes/teams/individuals were hitting the CNS hard on back to back days, long before we even knew about the CNS recovery time frame, and they did fine.  But was “fine” as good as it could have been?

     

    While both strategies have their merits, I’m embarking myself and some others on a spring/summer routine soon.  Because multiple daily sessions/nor long sessions will be possible, the 5 day template is my intent.  Are there any guidelines for determining how intense those conditioning days should be?  Is it more just a process of being a coach and seeing how it affects the next day?  Or perhaps, determining the intensity/duration based on the importance of that biomotor quality at the given time?  

     

    I guess I’m just looking to better understand why Joe/Tier training still holds to the old dogma and how it’s been found to be most successful without interfering with the next day’s performance?

     

  • #31230

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Coach Kenn,

     

    What do you mean by Explosive Development for your Wednesday conditioning.  I am at a small college and am looking at a mon-thurs summer conditioning schedule for our kids. 

     

    Thanks for the Help!

     

    Coach Bear

  • #31278

    Coach Rashad
    Participant

    I have implemented jump training and taught the importance of learning the mechanics of how to jump properly over the past year more than I ever have. There are a couple of additional pieces that I added into my program as well. Specifically for my volleyball and basketball players to teach them how to power down the arms with maximal speed I added overhead medball slams, and to add maximal vertical arm speed I added in a vertical toss with the medballs from an athletic position.

     

    There is one question that I do have in regards to the tuck jumps. Would anyone recommend doing the tuck jumps with an additional normal vertical jump to a box, or would that interfere with the arm mechanics of doing a proper vertical jump?

     

    This video is a great teaching tool, appreciate the post.

     

    Coach Rashad

  • #31290

    Coach Rashad
    Participant

    Good posting Girth. CNS recovery is and will continue to be a topic in this field as we continue to evolve and find what works best for our athletes and their performance. As a young coach in the field I cannot speak for many of the past programs other then what has been read, but I can say that as athletes continue to evolve and the importance of rest becomes more significant. As we can all see athletes are not becoming smaller. For the programs that are shifting to all work to being done on the same day that may be what works for them. As for my personal experience in training and coaching via the Tier System, I look for max effort in all speed/agility days and the same on conditioning days. The volumes will vary but the intensity should remain.

     

    As a current believer, coach, and trainee of the Tier system, one thing that should always remain is the integrity of the system. Once you understand the system you can implement the intensity of the program as you wish, and the volume you use is ultimately up to you. So I would not necessarily say that there are guidelines to follow just keep the integrity. To better answer your question on what works, I believe with your situation this is more of embracing the process as a coach. To determine what works best you must first know the load of work your athletes may or may not be able to handle in a given training session.The program is ultimately yours, so you control what works best for you.

     

    The Tier System has been most successful because of how everything is ranked. The tiers of the program allow you to implement exercises by rotation. So you will hit nearly every part of the body in an individual session.The reason this tends not to effect the next day’s performance is due to the quality of work you are doing without targeting an area but hitting the body as a whole allowing for more recovery. For my past experiences in training, CNS recovery seemed to be effected negatively on following days the most when heavier loads or a ton of volume was lifted in a targeted area at one given time. i.e. the old 2 upper days and 2 lower days of lifting. I would always find myself being fried physically when trying to perform the next day, whether it was conditoning, speed/agility, or just lifting. Surely everyone responds differently, but it at the end of the day what works best for you?

    I hope this helps!

    Best Regards,

    Coach Rashad

  • #31279

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Explosive Development is our “Plyometric” training. The true definition of Plyometric does not fit our primary jump and throw work so I use Explosive Development. We are now implementing a new Tier System Speed Template to coincide with our our strength sessions. More to come

    Coach “HOUSE”

  • #31287

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Coach,

    Great Post. We are in the thick of our Spring Developmental Phase and I am slightly behind on the site, I will respond this weekend. Thanks for joing the forum

    Coach ”HOUSE”

  • #31291

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Coach,

    Great Post. As I have just mentioned to another Coach, we have been swamped with Spring Developmental Work with our players. I will be amswering to thebest of my ability your question of Conditoning this weekend. Just an FYI, I still hold true to old school conditioning methodology

    Coach “HOUSE”

  • #31292

    Jeff Wettschurack
    Participant

     Thanks for the time, of which I know is limited for all of us, and input gents.  I put the plan into action this week.  I’m already well aware of what the High-Low approach feels like from a recovery standpoint.  Though it’s MUCH too early to comment on the recovery effectivenesss of this strategy vs. the latter, the dispersement of the load across the week is less of a logistacal nightmare than what I’m used to.  I’ll keep you posted as the weeks progress.  

  • #31288

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Questions A and C ? you are spot on in my opinion

    B ? We use a 2×3 program also during the season, Session T Monday and U on Wednesday.  I would recommend you rethink Tier 2 Upper Body Session L. I would look and a more traditional 3-4 week rotation of exercises. I do not believe you should rotate that many movements for ?maximal effort ?work in season.  We use 3-4 upper body movements within our 21 week pre and in season schedule. We will work up to a 1-3 singles at 91% for most of these rotations.  When we reach mid-season we replace the Traditional Session T training session with a Session T circuit program.

     

    Word’s WIn

    Coach “HOUSE”

  • #31293

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    I can only speak for myself. I do not get to overly crazy about the CNS stuff. I feel that we have been very successful and implmenting a weekly plan that implements numerous bio motor abilities and have been successful because we do a very good job of dispersing loads.  Our programming has changed very little within the original framework with the exception that we train Mon-Thurs with our guys.  When I first described our weekly plan to Loren Seagrave he considered our Lifting Days – Neural and our Conditioning Days – Metabolic.  Because of our schedule we do add conditioning to our lifting days when needed.  I beleive if the overall volume of work is controlled multi bio motor abilities can be trainied successfully in a daily session(s) or through out a mircocycle.  This is why I beleive in concurrent sequencing. We in the US, who work primarily within the framework of HS, College, or Pro rules and calendars will never get enough consecutinve time in the off season to truly BLOCK work. There will always be a designated break required by rules. And from my understanding of BLOCK Periodization you Raise and Retain traits, similar to Concurrent Sequencing principles.  We stand by the work because it has stood the test of time. We always desinged our running program first, looked at the duration and volume in yards of each individual effort and then designed the training cycle of the strength sessions accordingly.  Higher volume Running Reps meant higher volume reps per set. As the season became closer the yardage of efforts decreased dramatically and did the reps and intent of effort in the weight room.

     

    In the end, I beleiv there is no right or wrong answer, it comes down to belief.  If you believe in your heart that the program has the best intention fo the athlete and team in mind, it will come thorugh to the athletes by how emotionally attached you are to the program. Believe me, your athletes will know real quick if you don’t believe in the program.  Also, I have found this out too, the hard way, sometimes the better athletes win regardless.  Do your due deligence, believe in YOUR plan, and coach your kids up and you will most likely have positive results!

     

    Word’s Win

    Coach ”HOUSE”

  • #31297

    rmeeks001
    Member

     Can you set the DB Elevator work as a blitz workout? 

  • #31298

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    YES! But, I would be conscience of load and what upper body movements in will preceed in weekly plan.  I would recommend 1 round of 5 levels with no more that 15 reps per level

  • #31299

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

  • #31300

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    I would also include – restoration modalities – contrast bath, needling, ART, MAT etc.  At my level this is huge. 

     

    Coach ”HOUSE”

  • #31301

    Jeff Wettschurack
    Participant

     Granted this is a forum about improving athletic qualities, however I can’t help but ask, where does the skill work fit in?  I can see the industry beginning to realize that too much emphasis is being put on training, and not enough on “PLAYING” your sport or improving your skills.  In some cases, even maintaining them.  Skill retention/heightening surely must come into play in the offseason as well.  Little is said about programming it however, in conjunction with heightening athletic attributes.  

     

    Can someone outline a weekly template which includes all the components of the tier system, along with where/when/how to plug in the sports performance and skills work, both in and out of season?

     

     

  • #31294

    Jeff Wettschurack
    Participant

     I too understand the power of belief and how science is often overridden by the powers of the mind.  But belief has to override knowledge sometimes.  And with those of younger experience, this is easy to achieve.  Us older guys tend to know too much and our brains get in the way.  That said, I’m selling out to it for the summer and already have with myself and my kids.  And by kids I mean high school and college age.

     

    We are now into week 2 of our endurance/volume emphasis.  It’s hard to gauge how the kids are reacting as they were out of shape to begin with.  But I’ll throw in my 2 haypennies based on the shift from the CNS centered approach to the tier.  My legs have yet to recover and are tired daily, but this a volume phase.  My previous conditining was 20 minutes of intervals at game specific speeds and rest periods after the M/W/F weights, along with 2000 yards of 100yd temp runs with 25s rest on T/Th.  So a couple more weeks, and we’ll see.

     

    The one thing I did notice however which leads me to my real question is this.  My CNS is neither fried nor completely amped.  With the high/low approach I formerly used, I usually felt great maybe 2-3 days a week, but was almost shot on the off days.  That said however, it makes me wonder about the “point” of training.  Is it really an athletes goal to train particular qualities (speed, height, distance, strength level, etc) under “ideal” conditions?  With the high-low model that is essentially what the goal is.  Improve that one time best.

     

    However, if we are training the same qualities under different circumstances that are less than ideal, due to weekly fatigue or workout structure, is the training effect lessened?  When performing any activity, the existing fatigue would then necessitate other muscle cells to be called into play for performance of the activity.  And the more you can call upon, the more you have to exhaust when it comes time to play.  That makes sense from an endurance standpoint, which all team sports essentially are……power endurance.

     

    It’s also been said the the lower you play below maximum, the longer you can perform.  But that “maximum” is more genetically dependant I would think.  Attempts to train in a style which constantly seeks to elevate it, may not improve it all that much.  You can only be “so” fast, and you will still probably get beat by the kid who was faster than you in high school.  Whereas attempts to improve endurance of any kind have a much larger capacity for improvement, regardless of genetics.  Maintaining 90% of your speed for the entire game should be the focus, I would think.  And hopefully that’s what we’ll find after this summer’s work.  

     

    Maybe a little too much thinking out loud.  But writing it down helps me rehearse it and look for holes.  Then I can further explain it to the kids, and get them along with my analytical ass, to BELIEVE.

     

  • #31303

    Jeff Wettschurack
    Participant
    House can probably speak well to this, but perhaps others have experimented as well.  I know Joe did some Modified Max Effort training while at AZ.   And I’m sure someone on here is familiar with Wendler’s 5/3/1, which is essentially the same.  But I would like to get some feedback, if it exists, on the athletic out come of implementing the effort tier from both a low volume modified max effort approach and a high volume SE one.
     
    Will the ability to repeat a speed/acceleration only be attained through actual performance of that activity on the field. And if that is the case, it makes sense to seek out the highest strength possible via a rep max set, a la the 5/3/1 method.
     
    But if the multiple set loading transfers over as longer time to fatigue, due to more and more fibers being fatigued, then it would make sense to utilize a submaximal multiple set scheme for the effort tier.  
     
    Thoughts?
  • #31280

    Jeff Wettschurack
    Participant

    [QUOTE]Big House wrote

    Stay with 3×5 invest in movement work!

    [/QUOTE]

     

    Can you expound slightly on this?  I assume you mean unloaded bodyweight work done on the field, correct?  If so, how are you implementing this within the scheme of the tier system.

  • #31281

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Movement Work refers to our readiness program that starts our daily session. Yes, it is our unloaded bodyweight work done on the field. It includes lunge progressions, your typical runnng mechanic drills, and crawling.

    Coach HOUSE

  • #31295

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Our concurrent approach raises and retains multiple bio motor abilities simaultaneously during a specific training session and a microcycle.  We have always had tremendous results utilizng our “moderate” structure.  I always felt 85% was the number, but when we did our metabolic strength testing at the end of summer the majority of our guys finished well over 90% for mulitple singles.  Training for team sports is much different than the indivudual sporting of events that occur in track and field which is where most people are getting their strength information from or weightlifting manuals.  Those sports or events are easily trainable as there is one dominant trait per event.  Team sports are a much different animal as there are many attributes that occur simulataneosly during one bout of exercise.

     

    Coach HOUSE

  • #31302

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Skill Work – first and foremost skill work should be handled by those who are the experts, the athletes specific position and sport coach. They are the real specific physical preparation coaches.  This occurs in practice. We are the general and general specific coaches.  Yes, there are some things that we can come close to teaching from a specific sense, but I am very leary of getting to committed to the true specifc fundamentals that a specific coach applies, regardless of how many times I observe his practice individual periods.

     

    I would also tend to disagree with industry putting too much emphasis on training, The USA is backwards when it comes to general physical preparation compared to specific prep. We have our children starting younger and younger in organized sports, many of them playing multiple leagues within the same season.  This has lead to to the increased amount of orthopedic injuries to our adolescent age athletes because of overuse, over zealous parents, and no foundational physical fitness.

     

    Skill work will be done within the rules of the organization in most cases or in the college football stage, PRP’s, player run practices.  I will state from my own expereince with PRP’s they are great for what you are asking about as far as skill work, but htey are a true detriment to the general prep of a team.  You have to account for these training hours in the weekly, monthly, program development and if these PRP’s run long as ours did, it will have a negative effect on the overall conditiong andfatigue of your athletes.

     

    Coach HOUSE

  • #31304

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    We determined the majority of our volumes per Tier in the strenght session base don the volume and types of activity in the running/conditioning program.  If we were running longer distances less sets more reps per set. As the distances and repetitions in the running shortened and increased we increased the sets and decreased the reps based on our utilization of Prilipen’s Chart.

     

    Coach HOUSE

  • #31282

    Jeff Wettschurack
    Participant

     Gotcha…..thanks.

  • #31296

    Jeff Wettschurack
    Participant

    First and foremost, thanks for the time House.  I know how little we all have.  I appreciate the antecdotal perspective more than anything.  We are just getting through our final week of high volume running and strength work.  Most of my guys can’t hit the goal times you have outlined for the OTB group, but they aren’t all D1 athletes either.  As the “old man” at 37, I’m hitting most of them, and eventually it will piss the young’ns off enough for them to try harder.

  • #31305

    Jeff Wettschurack
    Participant

      Great, I’ve always done the same as well.  I couldn’t ever get the modified max effort stuff to work too well.  Yeah it’s impressive, but it saps so much CNS power that the work following it is either of poor quality or lessened in duration.  Perhaps that has more to do with the type of nervous system one has, but regardless, it makes more sense to me to look at it from a total workload perspective.  Or as you probably call it, “power capacity”.  Flat loading isn’t as sexy or glamorous as progressive loading, and requires a good deal of internal motivation.  But it sure ups the total workload, and is MUCH harder, so that can’t be a bad thing.  

     

    I also think that workiing to a top set teaches you to become more efficient with the existing innervations you have, whereas flat loading calls in to play more innervations as fatigue sets in.  And in reality, activating those new muscle cells is what it’s all about.  As we can then use them in our sport specific movement and thus delay the time to fatigue on the field. 

  • #31254

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    [QUOTE]Big House wrote

    Modifications are made in exercise/moevement choices per position groups.  

    [/QUOTE]

     

    Looking over old forum posts and was wondering if you could elaborate on how and what differences you would make for those in the Front 7 and those Outside the Box. I definitely see a difference in having them perform certain exercises but was seeing if you could give us an example of what you’ve used time and time again that has always worked.

     

    Thanks, 

     

    Tolzman

  • #31306

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    House,

     

    Hope all is well. I was wondering if you could give us all a rundown of how you ran Training Camp while you were in the collegiate setting.  Just looking an overview of how the week was set up and how the structure of the strength program looked while they were in this intensive loading period of skill work.

     

    Really looking forward to your response.  Hopefully this will spark more questions from others on this forum and if there are other coaches who want to also give us their way, please feel free.  I’m looking for as many responses as possible on this thread.

     

    Thanks, 

    Tolzman 

  • #31307

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     Things changed when the rules changed and you could no longer have back to back 2x a Days. We trained each day during the Acclimatization 5 day period and then we went to in season type model right away.  We trained on the single practice day during camp and rotated T L U Sessions.  Previously to the rule cahnge, we utilized a circuit program.  This was done based specifically on our practice schedule and was always done after the am practice.  We are totally circuit based now during camp.  We rotate daily 2 groups, Front 7 and Outside the Box.  We train after the AM field session.

     

     

    Word’s Win

    Coach Kenn

  • #31255

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     Biggest Differences In Season

    Lower Body – OTB do not perform BiLateral Squating movements – All movements are independant limb

    Total Body – OTB will do Box Jump Variations Versus Pulls for Front 7.  The will do some basic kettlebell swings as well as Kettlebell power pulls

  • #31256

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Makes perfect sense.

     

    Were these changes for in-season trianing used during your time in the League or was it also used when you were in the collegiate setting as well? 

     

    I hope camp is going well for you.  We start camp next week at Georgetown.

  • #31257

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     Most In The League – We jumped Tier 3 IN Season on Session U Thursday in College Setting.  

     

    Just a side note. This year we are going to give the OTB the option of doing a Goblet or Anterior Loaded Double Kettlebell Squat.

     

    Good Skill and Words Win

  • #31308

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     Coach,

     

    I remember seeing posts about the in-service you hosted in Charlotte and one thing that caught my attention was a post regarding a new template for speed, agility, jump & throws. I was wondering if you could elaborate about the new template.

     

    I’m looking forward to your response.

     

    Tolzman

  • #31309

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    This is a true work in progress and the lead on this is my assistant Brett Nenaber. Brett played for me at Arizona State and is also an accomplished Olympic Weightlifter.  When we were discussing speed development iand ways to implement it into a microcycle, Brett brought up utilizing the same principles of the Tier Strength training model for speed components. As of today, the three components we are utilizing are, Technique, Explosive, and Speed.  We utilize the three components with Plyometric Activity, Lateral, and Linear Movement.

     

    A particlular session could look like this

    Tier 1 Phyo Technique

    Tier 2 Lateral Explosive

    Tier 3 Linear Speed

     

    We are still looking at terminology as well as how to construct.  We may look at switching explosive with loaded, since most of our explosive work was with resistance.  We have had solid feedback from individuals I trust in Loren Landow of the Steadman Hawkins Clinic in Colorado as well as former Head Strength and Conditioning Coach of the Houston Rockets Daryll Eto.  We have received some good feedback from reknowned Rugby strength coach Ashley Jones as well.

     

    When we get a better feel for what we want and how it shoudl look we will get more info out there. It should be noted this is not a conditioning template.  That is a seperate entitiy, but we do know there may be exceptions to this depending on the specific work week.

     

    Coach Kenn

  • #31310

    Msnyder
    Participant

     Coach,

    Will there be any additional content on the DVDs that was not presented at the seminar?

     

    Thanks!

  • #31311

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     Not that I am aware of.

  • #31318

    rbrokaw55
    Participant

     Coach, 

    Great information on here and I am looking forward to recieving my EAD dvds in the mail shortly. 

    I have been intrigued by the certification and sense you have it, I was wondering,  How much it has impacted the way you coach?

  • #31319

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Appreciate the support! PN1 Certification is a very good and tough take home certification.  There is a lot of work to be done to prepare for exam.  Quality information.  I took the certification because a former assistant of mine was huge nutrition conscience and Berardi fan.  I would say as far as my daily impact, minimal.  We have a nutritionist on site and it reaffirmed the basics I relay to athletes. When it gets specific I pass it on the EXPERTS!.  I wish I could say it and I did more with it but I can’t.  Hope this helps

     

    Coach Kenn

  • #31320

    bloodhound
    Participant

     Which is better for a high school athlete. A 1 RM or a projected RM?

  • #31321

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    I’ve worked at a high school for 5 years now and I know I might take some heat for this, but I believe a 5 rep max at 92-95% is the safest way to go. When I worked at the college level and private sector I was a huge 1-3 rep guy. Mentally I feel high school kids are not prepared to do a one rep max effort lift at 100%. Physically I see them brake down when the reps get over 95%. My view is always a “risk/reward” factor. Is that extra weight for less reps really worth it? Hope this helps

  • #31322

    Coach Rashad
    Participant

           I agree with you jlinden66, as a current high school strength coach, I prefer not to put an 1RM load on any of my athletes. There are exceptions, but those tend to be a select few of my seniors that are going into their freshman year of college. Considering that many high school athletes have little to no previous lifting experience, putting an 1RM load on them that they have not been accustomed to lifting can be potentially harmful. Also many of them (high school athletes) are learning how to work under semi-heavy loads with maximum effort. So I do a projected 1RM by doing 5RMs depending upon the lift and if I am confident enough in their lifting to progress them into the next BLOCK of training. I hope this gives you a little insight as well to knowing that there is no rush to get kids giving a maximum effort without lifting a maximum load.

  • #31323

    Msnyder
    Participant

     As a high school strength and conditioning coach I do not use a 1RM with my athletes in most cases. The only exception being on the Power Clean, and even with that, once the form starts to break (jumping jack catch, low elbows) I cut them off. I use 3RMs with the my guys on all other lifts for all of the same reasons that have already been mentioned. By basing everything on their 3RM we are still using enough weight to get the kids stronger, but in a much safer way IMO. I’ve witnessed it happen with my own eyes, and even under my supervision, kids working at or near their true maxes and they don’t know to handle the loads and something bad happens. Teenagers can get really darn strong while never moving maximal weights. That’s the great thing about puberty, it’ll do some of the work for you.

  • #31324

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    As my experience has grown, and I have said in the past,  that my year in the private sector made me a much better coach for developmental athletes, I believe in a Multiple Repetition testing scenario versus a Single Rep Maximum for athletes in the high school age bracket.

     

    1st, as far as safety goes, we must be careful with the terminology we use and I will use an example presented in this thread.  I never look at my testing parameters as which is safer or which is not, I look at if from a confidence issue.  If the athlete is prepared for a single rep max then he is prepared regardless of risk. If the athlete is prepared for a 5 rep max, then he is prepared regardless of risk.  

     

    When you are training for a multiple rep max versus a single rep max, in my opinion, as far as the term “Safety” is concerned the 1 RM is safer.  If I squat 100% 400 x1 there is 1 chance of the risk of injury and 400 pounds of total load.  If I use 90% of 400 for a 5 RM there are 5 chances of injury and 2000 pounds of total load.  You are all smart enough to make your own opinions of this, my tangent educational rant is over!   I have used a similar example with a former Head Football Coach I worked with when he was concerned about 1 rep max on test day. Needless to say, I won. I am not telling you what to do, but, I am really concerned on how we explain certain training principles we use without really looking at the true results.  Thoughts for all of us to ponder.

     

    2nd, Why I like multiple repetition training with this age bracket and a big reason why I love our Volume Accumulation Training system, is multiple repetitions helps the athlete build confidence among other important traits.  By using a VAT model of flat loading the % and increasing the volume, you increase the density of training (capacity), you increase the volume of work (lean body mass +) and you increase base strength and increased repetitions (tendon/ligament strength).  

     

    Younger athletes get intimidated with 1RM work because the are afraid to miss and fail infront of their peers. Plus, this is a lot of weight, somehting they have never done before. Multiple Repeition loads allows most athletes to acheive something, whether they acheive the desired goal rep or not they still accomplish positive reps.

     

    3rd, We need to make sure we are aware of technical efficiency failure in mulitple rep testing.  If the goal is 5 and rep 3 is technically slipping, you have to be smart enough to call it a day because where do you think rep 4 and 5 are heading at a pretty significant load.

     

    Sorry, need to run out to our mock game. I could go on, but htis looks like a thread that can carry some good discussion. So, let’s have at it

     

    WORDS WIN

    Coach House

  • #31325

    Coach Rashad
    Participant

    To delve more into this thread, I couldn’t agree more with Coach House on his 2nd and 3rd points. Especially the younger athletes being afraid of failure, specifically in front of their peers. The building of confidence at these ages are critical for the progress that they are hoping to see and what we as coaches are wanting to accomplish.  And with the 3rd point he mentioned being smart about the what we are witnessing during a 3-5RM. If you have worked with any pre-college teens you have witnessed poor technique during fatigue at some point of training whether it be a push-up, lunge, or jump. But, when it comes to auto-regulating during a 3-5RM we must know when to say enough is enough regardless of what the athlete may think that they can complete. Many  of my athletes know by now that everything I coach them is in their best interest. So we as coaches must embrace the process the same way as the kids do regardless of how many pats on the back you may receive from sport coaches or parents that may not be educated in the strength field.

     

    Great thread to continue!

     

    Coach Rashad

  • #31326

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    I was actually thinking more about this topic since last week and mentally kids also have a problem with handling higher load volume. My definition of a “stressful load” is sometimes much different from a 15-16 year olds definition. Besides working on technique, and details of certain movements I see that when kids get unconfortable they tend to fail because they have never been in that position of stress. I’ve seen this with as little as 70-75% of work load. With first time students their muscles start to burn, and this stuff called sweat is coming from their body. They have never felt that way before and tend to only do 3 reps when you know damn well they could have done 5 reps. As House says “embrace the process” but it does get frustrating. They can rep the hell out of texting though.

  • #31327

    Coach Cash
    Participant

     Great question.  I think there a lot of factors that weight in on this topic.  I am not sure if one answer is good for all.

     

    Female athletes may never need to be tested 1RM.  At the high school level (and often college) female athletes lack confidence (already mentioned) and sometimes the “want to” to peform a 1RM.  But the same can be said for some male athletes.  Kids that don’t participate in the power sports just aren’t surrounded with that mentality.  So perhaps it depends on the sport.  At the college level and now the high school level, I have never tested a 1RM with basketball–we usually test a 3RM or 5RM as it seems more applicable for training and testing. But for track athletes that sprint and particpate in field events, there is merit in performing a 1RM.  Consistency in the weight room also can impact testing.  If a team only lifts part of the year, then testing may never happen.  Next, training protocols have a huge impact on testing parameters.

     

    I am going to lay out our testing protocols from spring of 8th grade and up for football since they are typically the sport people refer to for 1RM

     

    Winter 8th Grader

    Jan-March–Block Zero

    April-May–Block Zero Intensification

    Summer 8th Grader

    Jun-July–Work to 8RM on trap bar dead, front squat, overhead press

    Fall 9th Grader

    Aug-Sept–Work to 5RM on trap bar dead, front squat, overhead press

    Oct-Nov–Work to 3RM on trap bar dead, front squat, overhead press

    Dec–Recovery, Two Weeks off

    Winter 9th Grader

    Jan-Mid Feb–Work to 5RM traditional deadlift, squat, bench press, power clean

    Mid Feb-End March–Work to 3RM traditional dead, squat, bench, power clean

    April – May–Recovery, Inseason for Spring Ball

    Summer 9th Grader

    June-July–Work to 3RM Power Clean, Squat, Bench

    Fall 9th Grader

    August–In Season Training

    Winter 10th Grader

    Jan-Mid Feb–Work to 3RM power clean, squat, bench

    Mid Feb-End March–Work to 1RM power clean, squat, bench

     

    This is just a guideline and I try my best to stick to it.  One other thing to consider is the impact of strength meets.  Here in SC strength meets are huge!!!!  So we have to prepare our kids to handle a heavy load if they go to strength meets.  However, with there only being three lifts, I can control what our younger kids do and I can stop them well below what they think they need to do.  Hope all this make sense.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

       

  • #31330

    tyler10p
    Participant

     Coach,

     

    I realize you work with power athletes mainly but do you have any input on constructing the tier system for endurance athletes or tactical (military) athletes with endurance needs.

  • #31328

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Coach Cash,

     

    Quick question, how many days a week do you work with your students, and how much time are you given?  I’ve recently started working with 7-8th grade students and I’m doing 1-2 days a week for 15-35 minutes depend on the schedule.

     

    Thank you,

     

    Jesse

  • #31331

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Tyler,

     

    I work with a tactical population and use the Tier System. In our experience not a whole lot changes with military personnel. They all need to squat, pull, press carry and hinge. The only real modification we made is the T4-T5 work is our bodyweight/gymnastic work. Sometimes we’ll simulate PT test protocols during these tiers. The other aspect we’ll implement in T4-T5 is a loaded carry variation. 

     

    During times of high operational tempo/shorten training times, we’ll modify T4-T5-PC-PS as our movement prep. We also implement neck and grip training. Although loaded carries and row variations are great for grip, direct grip work (specifically grip work that involves the ring and pinky fingers) has shown a correlation to marksmanship. We implement the Captains of Crush grippers and also use them as an evaluation tool in our assessment. 

     

    Hope this helps.

     

    v/r

    Mike

  • #31329

    Coach Cash
    Participant

     Sorry for the delay….busy week last week and I was out of town.  It depends on when I train them.  If I get them during school we usually go for an hour 3x per week.  If it’s in the morning before school or after school we only go twice–in the fall.  Fall is crazy for me b/c we have so many spring sports lifting.  In the spring after school it’s usually my rising 9th graders for football and we go three because I have more time.  

  • #31332

    tyler10p
    Participant

     Helps tremendously. How do you program in conditioning work?

  • #31333

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    We’ve programed ESD work a couple different ways. One of the things we have to adjust to at different points during the year is combatives work. 

     

    Option 1: MWF-Strength, Tu/Th-ESD

    Option 2: MWTh-Strength, Tu-ESD, Fri-Combatives

     

    The themes of the conditioning work depend on their operational cycle. Programming wise, this is still a work in progress, however we primarily focus on alactic/aerobic qualities which is 90% of which their job demands.  By far this has been the most challenging environment in terms of creating an “annual plan”. If we can program up to 8 weeks without it changing, that’s a win.

     

     

  • #31335

    Msnyder
    Participant

    Coach,

     It seems like there have been a lot of Achilles tendon tears this season. According to John Clayton, after week 1 of the season there were a total of 13 tears/ruptures if you count camps and OTAs. I know there have been a couple more with the latest being Dee Milliner last week. Does there seem to be more Achilles injuries this year, and if so do you have any thoughts on what may be contributing to this, or are the numbers normal and we are just hearing more about it this year?

  • #31334

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     I will let Mike take this one and run with it.  He seems to have found a successful plan. WORDS WIN MIKE

    Coach Kenn

  • #31336

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     Achilles Tendon injuries are now TOO common in the NFL. I was unaware of the amoung this year, there were quite a few last year if I recall.  I am no expert on why but when you disect things that are right there in front of you, you can obvioulsy ask certain questions abount many lower body injuries.  I always notice that in this day and age not all playing surfaces are the same.  When I played college ball there were two types of surface, Astroturf and Grass period.  It seems now when I arrive at various stadiums with field turf, not all field turf feels the same. I perform a training session early before every games, and some turf is soft with bounce, some hard, some with more rubber than others it really is quite evident and noticeable in my opinion.  Astrroturf always felt the same like playing on a street with a rug over it.  I also believe there is something going on with shoe development. And as we know the great speed guys are “wound up” tight and the game is extremely fast and explosive at this level.  Hard to pin point the exact factors but these are things that I contemplate out loud when someone asks my opinion on the subject, same with the Lisfranc fracture.

     

    Nothing research based just my thoughts 

    Coach HOUSE

  • #31337

    Coach Rashad
    Participant

    Coach Nenaber’s article I have now read 1/2 dozen times and really like the comparison of Olympic lifters versus athletes in sport who lift. I currently coach weight lifting on the high school level where I currently coach athletes who compete in multiple sports year round, though this will be my first year coaching a lifter coming into lifting season directly from another sport. My question for Coach Nenaber is how would you write your program for an athlete who is transitioning from a football season where they have trained for majority of the year, then roll right into a competitive Olympic weight lifting season?

    Coach Rashad

  • #31276

    Mike
    Participant

     What are your standards for testing out of Block 0? I’m trying to implement something similar and I know the Head FB coach will want to advance guys quicker than I would so I’d like to develop some standards that we are both comfortable with.  Thanks!

  • #31312

    Mike
    Participant

     I purchased the DVD’s and got the manual, is there a way to get the presentation slide in electronic format so that I can see the charts etc in a bigger format?

  • #31338

    Mike
    Participant

     

    I need some advice?I want to implement the Tier System at the small high school where I am the PE and Strength Coach, mainly with my football team. They have a dedicated class period for working out next semester. This class period only allows me 30min officially to train them on M Tu Fr, on Thu I get about 60 minutes with them and nothing on Wed. This class period is at the end of the school day and when it is over all the guys in the class that play another sport need to go to those practices (about 15 of 32 guys). When the others leave for practice I can ask the remaining kids to stick around and do more work but not all will be able to due to other commitments.

     

    How would you plan this out for TUL and should I even try to do any on field speed work during those short days?  I welcome all advice and other suggestions.  Thank you!

  • #31277

    mholst
    Participant

     I’m still working on a “rubric” for grading movement. This would be the most appropriate method I think… similar to scoring an FMS???

     

    As of now, I’m looking to see that they have technical proficiency in squatting, deadlifting, overhead pressing and bench pressing. When they show technical master in all of these lifts, I advance them. At this point, it’s pretty subjective, but I’m hoping to move towards something more objective soon.

     

  • #31313

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    I actually have the same question. The print in the booklet is to small for my eyes. Thank you for the help.

  • #31314

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     Sorry, I must have missed this one – If you specifially speaking about my presentations, tell me what you need and an email and I will get you information

     

    Apologies,

    Coach Kenn

    Words Win

     

  • #31315

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Thank you for responding back so soon. The slides that I would like to see are the “Evolution of Templetes,” and “Exercise Pool” for Pulls, Squats, and Single Leg movements.

     

    I appreciate the help,

     

    Jesse

    jlinden66@hotmail.com

  • #31344

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     Coach, 

     

    In the EAD DVDs you mentioned QBs and how their training is different from the other position groups (OTB/F7).  I assume that the integrity of the system is still intact but there must be criteria in regards to each category like: 

     

    Total Body – Jumps, Throws, Olympic Movement Pulls

    Lower Body – Not much different than other groups with the exception of Front Squat, maybe substitute with Double KB Front Squat

    Upper Body – More uni-lateral work in a nuetral grip position with the possiblity of having more tiers with just pulling movements as the focus

     

    I guess my question is, could you describe what goes through your head when you’re looking at programming for your QBs in both the college setting and now in the league.

     

    If anyone else on here has criteria or important factors that influence the programming for your QBs, please feel free to reply.

     

    Thanks,

     

    Tolzman

  • #31258

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Coach, 

     

    Looking at the differences between the two Front 7 groups, did their lower body exercise selection differ?  With the interior line more bi-lateral squatting movements with minimal uni-lateral movements while the F72 will have maybe 2 bi-lateral movements with one uni-lateral movements.  Looking forward to your response.

     

    Thanks, 

     

    Tolzman

  • #31259

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     Tolzman,

     

    Give yourself some credit, you are on point! I hope you are asking questions so you have some reaffirmation that you are on the right path.  YOU ARE!!!!!!!

     

    WORDS WIN

    COACH HOUSE

  • #31260

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Coach, 

     

    It’s definintely reassuring to know that I’m on the right track, trying to do my best at answering the question “How would House do it?”.

     

    Thanks Coach, 

     

    Tolzman

  • #31316

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     Just got back from Combine will send shorlty – I  am speaking at the EFS Sports Performance Summit this weekend, need to send in a powerpoint.

  • #31339

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Coach,

    First off, I recommend we build off the Thursday session.  Depending on what you consider to be the most important session of the week T,L, or U, I would make Thursday that Session.  This is the day you want to have the most allotted time to ensure the success of the training session. I would make sure your team knew that this is the day when we expect a high level of work to be done.  At most of the places I have worked at, I would choose Session L – Big Squat Day.  As I had said previously it is up to the lead coach, to make that decision.

     

    It also works to your advantage, because based on your week, you have the day before off.  I would then implement the other 2 sessions on Monday and Tuesday. You may look to pair up the Tiers for those sessions in a round system to get as much work as possible in. I would concetrate on Tiers 1-3 and with 30 minutes in may only be Tiers 1-2.

     

    Friday is simple.  This day would be a medley of all the major assitance work, Tier 4-5 movements. Step Ups, Lunges, Pistol Squats, SA Rows, Push Ups, Box Jumps, SA Snatches etc.  You could be quite creative on this day.

     

    Hope this provides some insights

     

    WORDS WIN
    COACH HOUSE

  • #31345

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     Coach,

    You have pretty much answered your own question.  Here and my level, this positin is quite unique because we have a Genetically Gifted individual who plays for us.  His program in off the grid!  Our seocnd quarterback is an 11 year vet.  He follows a Tier program during the developmental phase and then he is on a unique schedule for the season. Out third QB is another Gifted athlete who also plays WO and Special Teams for us. He trains as if he is a OTB player.  He is very weight room savy and one of our strongest guys.

     

    Notes

    Lower Body – Single Leg Dominant work with some Belt Squat as well as Anterior Loaded KB Squats. Band work is a high emphasis

     

    Upper Body – Shoulder Matrix – a wide variety of shoulder movements, whether it be, bands, db, kb, core stix, trx, etc.

     

    My quarterback program really changed in 2003 atr ASU whne we started getting NFL level players at that position.  It was time to take a unique focus on this position

     

    Words Win

    Coach House

  • #31346

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Coach,

     

    I was reading your old blog post regarding OS and how you were looking to implement it into the program.  I was wondering if you could give us some feedback on how the results were from it this past season. Were there any short comings when implementing it?

     

    I appreciate you answerings my questions galore.

     

    Tolzman 

  • #31317

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     Emailing today

  • #31347

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     Implementing new ideas or methods In Season is a risky proposition.  Unfortunately, for all strength coaches, the In Season represents the longest uniterrupted training program of the annual plan.  So, how do you implement new and innovoating ideas during this time of year?  For us at the professional level it is our practice squad and for college athletes it would be with your newcomers.

     

    We implemented a basic segmental rolling, rocking and crawling program into our Practice Squad program.  This was prescribed as a round of our readiness program.  We were implementing a 3 round Session Specific Readiness program to begin our training. We substituted one round our for our Basic Reset work utilizing principles and movements form the Original Strength protocols.  I would say after the athletes realized the benefits, it was automatic for them to get on the ground and begin the session in this manner.

     

    Moving forward I am in the process of determing how I will utilize it in the Developmental Program that starts Mid April.  We will crawl during our field work, and I am looking to add the segmental rolling as part of our post session recovery.  

     

    Personally, I have created a simple but effective daily program.  I do this before every training session.  This will be filmed soon and posted as an “Insider” edition to Inside the House our new Vlog

     

    Words Win

    Coach HOUSE

  • #31340

    mholst
    Participant

    Coach, 

     

    Thanks for the insight to the previous poster. I am in a similar boat. Currently, we are TUL on MWF after school.

     

    Next year, we will get a Zero Period Athletic Class dedicated to Sports Performance. The class will be held MTuWTh for about 45 minutes each day. 

     

    I’m assuming your suggestion (based on the previous answer) would be to go T on Monday, U on Tuesday, L on Thursday and do the medley of assistance work on Wednesday?

     

    Thanks!

  • #31341

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     Coach,

    My question to you on Zero hour. Does that mean it is the first period of the school day? If so, would they allow you to start the class early?

  • #31342

    mholst
    Participant

     Yes, it is the 1st period of the day. They might allow us to start earlier, but school starts at 7:20 for 1st period, so our Zero Period start time would likely be 6:00 am and end at 6:50 am. We want to give some time for the players to get to the cafeteria for the free breakfast most of them get as well as shower time.

  • #31343

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     Whoa! 7:20 period 1, early bird get right. 

     

    Words Win

    Coach Kenn

  • #31348

    Vince148
    Participant

    I have been a powerlifter for 40 years and I incorporate different methodologies into my training programs for athletes. As I’ve gotten older, I have found that my body obviously doesn’t recover as quickly as it did before. So, in my own training, I am only good for one max effort lift per workout. Then when I discovered the tier system, I realized that for at least my self, I have been doing something similar all along.

    With my athletes, I like to train various concepts, similar to what you might find in Westside’s protocol. I have your book and the football program, but I see things that don’t appear to have been previously explained. For example, in the article about training WL and athletes, it shows a template with a circuit at the end of the plan, but I don’t see anything about circuit training. Also, I don’t see much about where to incorporate jump training and plyometrics. Are they considered supplemental exercises? Are they/can they be used in the second or third tier?

    Can one day be lower body emphasis, another upper body and the T workout have speed emphasis in the microcycle? For example, the T workout might be Cleans, jumps and med ball chest throws.

    So at least for now, I’m not seeing how some of these other things are incorporated into the training plan. Can you clarify some of these points?

  • #31349

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Circuit Training – We will utilize medley or circuit training for the bottom tiers 4 and 5 as well as neck, root, posterior chain, and posterior shoulder work.  we do this a a finisher and to reduce session duration.

     

    Jump training and teaching athletes to land is a stand alone section of training by most of our athletes.  If it is included as a movement in the tier system template than this athlete has been involved in the program for several years and we are substituting total body strength movements. 

     

    Plyometrics and throws are primarily done during our field work.

     

    The Tier System is based on rotating three movement categories daily, Total, Lower, and Upper.  You can train your athletes however you want, but training cleans, jumps and throws in the same total session would not be considered a Tier System program. As mentioned above, some of these drills are performed during our field sessions.

     

    Variablility of training is great for athletic based training but the athlete still must master fundamentals of certain movements before rotating movements on a more frequent basis.

     

    The Tier System methodology is based on training athletes outside the strength disciplines.  This program would not work for Olympic lifters or Bodybuilders. It may have some merit for beginning powerlifiters but, that was not the intention of the system.

     

    Words Win!

    Coach Kenn

     

  • #31350

    david
    Participant

     hi,

    i purchased the elitefts seminar and thought it was great.

    Will the presentation slides be put in the professional portal?

    or do they come with the download and I missed it?

     

    thank you

    david

  • #31351

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     David,

    Glad you enjoyed it. As per your question, I will put the slides in the portal next week as I start my vaction and will be working on content for the site.

     

    Words Win

    Coach Kenn

  • #31352

    david
    Participant

     Awesome news 

    thank you

    david

     

  • #31353

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     Working on major uploads over my vacation. I did not forget.  We will upload this presentation, my TSST presentations from EADS and 3 Inside the House Vlogs, two for Free, 1 for Members

     

    WORDS WIN

    Coach Kenn

  • #31355

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     I am hoping to find a member who recently emailed us about automatic renewals and prilepin chart slides for EADS 1.0 Seminar.  I am hoping if you read this you will resend your email.  We cannot find it and we want to respond

     

    Sincerely,

    BHP

  • #31356

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    We just completed the following presentation uploads.  You can find them in the Professional Portal – Presentation Library tab.  This material is available to Professional and All Access Members

     

    Uploads include

    Eric Cash’s Tier System Strength Training and Block Zero presentation from the Spartanburg Hammer Strength Clinic

    Coach Kenn

    1 – 2015 NSCA National Convention,  Push Jump Punch

    2 – 2015 Elite FTS Sport Performance Summit, Tier System Strength Training

    3 – 2015 Elite Athlete Development Seminar, Tier System Strength Training – broken down into 5 parts

     

    Look for an upcoming Inside the House Video on the Safety Squat Bar Front Squat as well an episode on Training the Snatch

     

  • #31354

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     SLIDES ARE UP – Professional Portal Presentation Tab

  • #31357

    tonyt50
    Member

     Anyone’s thoughts on how to adjust things in-season during a shortened week? Like turning around from a Saturday game to a Thursday Night?

  • #31358

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     Coach,

    What is a typical training schedule for your squad.  If you were in a typical Saturday to Saturday game week, would you train on Sunday or Monday?  That would be a big factor on how I would advise.  When I was is college we trained Sunday, Tuesday, Thursday for a traditional week.  In the Pac 10 at that time we were primarily Saturday to Saturday. We never played on a Thursday.  We played our rival on the Friday after Thanksgiving several times so it was easy for us.

     

    When I went to a Big East school we played everyday of the week.  I always counted back to see if we could get a full seven days if not, I looked at game day back.  In your scenario based on our typical work week, I would go Thursday (Game Day/Saturday), Wednesday (Walk Thru/Friday), Tuesday (Thursday – We would train Thursday’s session), Monday Practice Only, Sunday Traditional Sunday Training Session. I would omit the Tuesday session because that was the biggest training session of the week in terms of Volume and Upper Body Intesity.  This was also our Dynamic Effort Squat Day too.

     

    I hope this helps.  

     

    Words Win

    Coach Kenn

  • #31359

    Jeff Wettschurack
    Participant

     In your most recent interview with Mike Robertson you mentioned that you knew 3-4 guys whom you highly respect in you profession that have as you called it “flipped the switch” with regard to their training physical preparation approach.  Since I’ve followed you forever and probably follow those same people, would you be willing to tell us who those individuals are.  It might lead me/us down a path of understanding why they made that switch.

  • #31365

    jkapu
    Participant

    House, thanks a ton for all that you do! I’m a baseball guy trying to help dudes get on to the next level and realize training programs for throwers need to be dialed in differently. So as I came across your QB programs A-F and I like the structure of it all but would like to get some more info on how you set these QB programs up because I think the structure can apply to my guys. Anything specific that you would recommend for the baseball athlete? Thank you for your time.

    -John Kapu

  • #31360

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    I will revisit this podcast to see what context I was referring to.  

  • #31366

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Those QB porgrams where specifically written at that time for Andrew Walter, an ASU quarterback who would have been a 1st round draft pick if he were not injured our last game of his senior season.  A lot of that program was based on Andrew’s “love” of the weight room and the fact that he was a quarterback who did not need the same approach to training as front 7 and outside the box athletes

     

    From my perspective, if I were training baseball players, I would be very aware of the wrist and hand and eliminate movements that put added stress to that area.  So right away CLEANS are out!  On that same thought, I would have a hard time having them clean grip front squat.  Thankfully I have 2 variations of front squats that I believe are awesome, Safety Bar Front Squats and Double Kettlebell Anterior Loaded Squats.

     

    https://www.bighousepower.com/InsidetheHouseVLOG/InsidetheHouseEpisode8SafetySquatBarFront/tabid/148/Default.aspx

     

    I would not have a problem with field athletes doing barbell power pull work. I would have my pitchers do single arm power pull work with kettlebells.

     

    I would prefer all players do dumbbell/kettlebell horizontal and vertical presses, but would be “OK” with field players barbell benching on occasion but not the overhead press.

     

    I would include rotator cuff, posterior shoulder medleys as well as elbow/wrist flexion and extension work, and wrist rotary work.

     

    Single Leg work is a given, as is a tremendous amount of rowing, bilateral and unilateral.

     

    Neck, Root, Ankle work.

     

    I would evaluate all athletes through out Block Zero programa nd as I believe all athletes should learn basic movements, I will realize some sports will or amy have a different Block Zero approach.

     

     

    Hope this helps

     

    WORDS WIN

     

    COACH HOUSE

  • #31361

    Jeff Wettschurack
    Participant

     Thanks for allotting the time.

  • #31362

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    So I listened to the PodCast last night on the plane ride home from Tampa.  I believe you were referring to the portion on Charlie Francis’ High-Low running model.  As fas as coaches flipping the switch, there really is only one.  I mentioned 3 that I respect that believe in Charlie’s approach and that I may need to look deeper into this.  The one coach who I was referring to is the Head Strength and Conditioning Coach of the 49’ers.  He was on staff with is at UTAH and ASU.  The other two coaches I do not know their previously backgrounds to say they flipped the switch.  Since the time I met them they were big Charlie Francis believers.

     

    Hope this helps

    Coach Kenn

  • #31363

    Jeff Wettschurack
    Participant

     I assumed that was the “one” you were speaking to, as I know he’s been in correspondence with some of the Francis believers quite extensively.  And yes, it does help.  I’ve been on both sides of the coin as you are unfortunately all too aware of.  I’ll just have to “keep cranking” as you state, for you can’t look at the sporting results of either the 49’ers, or even the marked speed improvement of say the AZ Cardinals and state that it was the physical prep approach that was related.  For as you’ve stated and too well know, you have next to no time with these guys.  Not to mention the turnover of coaching personnel which then alters the tactics of a given team, or the change in personnel from year to year which migh have a team inheriting speed and not creating it.

     

    Thanks again for the time. 

  • #31364

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    As much as i beleive in my training approach, here is all you need to know, You don’t have players nothing matters!  Bad programming and great players and you win = great program. Great programming and bad players and you lose = bad program! PERIOD. Players/Athletes make the program successful and I have been fortuante in my 27 years to be surrounded by great players and great coaches.  I like my chances and I will always work in Moderate running into my program.

  • #31367

    coachsell75
    Participant

     Good morning everyone,

     

    I was curious what you all do for extra/auxiliary workouts after school.  I teach/coach at a high school and we have our mian offseason workout during our athletic period.  Then we have voluntary workouts afterschool. Thnaks for any input you guys can give me.  

  • #31368

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     Coach,

    Dependingon what you main sessionof the day consisted of would determine your post session extra’s.  This could be but not limited to single limb work, posterior chain and shoulder work, root/core work, movement drills (segmental rolling), neck and trap etc.  I would limit the work to 30-45 minutes with a solid prep to get a lather going.

     

    Words Win

    Coach Kenn

  • #31369

    coachsell75
    Participant

     Aweome.  Thanks for the info.  It sounds like I’m on the right track then.  We do a lot of barbell work during our athletic period.  I tried to make the extra sessions just like you stated.  I was sure to keep it at 45 minutes or less.  

  • #31370

    tcobb52
    Participant

     I can’t remember which EADs you talked about this but you mentioned you were working on a tiered approach on Linear/Lateral speed. Have you narrowed anything down yet. I’m starting to put together my winter speed work together and was wondering if you’re planning on posting it? Thanks.

  • #31264

    coachsell75
    Participant

     How would you guys split a football team of 117 players into a weight room with 14 racks and 14 platforms?  

  • #31378

    coachsell75
    Participant

     We are having a discussion amongst our coaching staff on how to incorporate the Tier system next semester in football off-season.  I have done the prgramming for a 3×3 tier.  My question, and what we are trying to figure out, is how do we get 117 football players in the weight room at once?  Our setup is quite small for a 5a high school in Texas.  We have 14 power racks and 14 platforms.  I was wondering how you all would work this situation?

     

    Thanks,

    Coach Sell

  • #31265

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     Are they all lifting at once? Full Team Training?

  • #31266

    Msnyder
    Participant

     If at all possible, try and get the groups split up. I was in a similar situation when I took over at Trinity. We had 120+ boys on our team Sophmore thru Senior. I was able to get the groups broken down to Varsity and JV. Roughly 65 in the Varsity group and and 55 in the JV. It was still large, but more manageable. We had 8 Platforms and 6 Racks to work with along with 8 standalone bench stations.

    For me, even with breaking them in to Var. and JV groups I would still have a lot of time where athletes were not working due to lack of equipment. So i broke them down further in to Big Skill and Small Skill groups. This allowed me to have guys in different areas of the room and working efficiently. There was no difference in what the kids were doing (i don’t think you really need to train the positions too differently at the high school level). The only difference was when they would do it.

     

    For example on a typical monday:
    Big Skill – Session T

    T– on the platform

    L– in the rack

    U – at the bench station

     

    Small Skill – Session L

    L – in the rack

    U – at the bench station

    T – on the platform

     

    Tiers 4&5 would were typically DB movements

     

    I would have to make changes on occasion if a group was a set or two behind, but generally this allowed my guys to move freely throughout the room without much down time between movements. It took some trial and error but I was able to get it to time out well.

     

    Hopefully this helps you out some.

     

  • #31379

    Msnyder
    Participant

     Coach,

    See my reply in the high school training thread. Hopefully it gives you some help.

  • #31267

    coachsell75
    Participant

    Yes, they would all be in the weight room lifting at once unless we can split them and still get three sessions done throughout the week. 

  • #31268

    coachsell75
    Participant

    [QUOTE]Msnyder wrote

     If at all possible, try and get the groups split up. I was in a similar situation when I took over at Trinity. We had 120+ boys on our team Sophmore thru Senior. I was able to get the groups broken down to Varsity and JV. Roughly 65 in the Varsity group and and 55 in the JV. It was still large, but more manageable. We had 8 Platforms and 6 Racks to work with along with 8 standalone bench stations.

    For me, even with breaking them in to Var. and JV groups I would still have a lot of time where athletes were not working due to lack of equipment. So i broke them down further in to Big Skill and Small Skill groups. This allowed me to have guys in different areas of the room and working efficiently. There was no difference in what the kids were doing (i don’t think you really need to train the positions too differently at the high school level). The only difference was when they would do it.

     

    For example on a typical monday:
    Big Skill – Session T

    T– on the platform

    L– in the rack

    U – at the bench station

     

    Small Skill – Session L

    L – in the rack

    U – at the bench station

    T – on the platform

     

    Tiers 4&5 would were typically DB movements

     

    I would have to make changes on occasion if a group was a set or two behind, but generally this allowed my guys to move freely throughout the room without much down time between movements. It took some trial and error but I was able to get it to time out well.

     

    Hopefully this helps you out some.

     

    [/QUOTE]

     

    Thanks! 

    I like the way you have this set up.  The probklem I see with our situation is that we do not have the seperate bench stations.  Maybe a way around that is that I could possibly utilize push-ups and db floor presses in the floor space in that the open area of our weight room.  What are your thoughts on that? 

  • #31269

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    The tough part when doing a large group at once with a multipurpose training station rather than a traditional squat rack, platform, bench station is the point you are running into, the upper body tier.  In some cases, with these huge rigs you have a platform on the front end with a half rack, middle of rig is the squat station, then the back end is another half rack to bench in.  Unfortunatley, not many have the size for these.

     

    It seems you have a solution to your problem with the push up/db floor press option.  That is a great fix.  Also possibly some vertical pressing movements.

     

    That is a huge group of men with 14 platforms.  

     

    Good Skill

    Words Win

    Coach Kenn

  • #31270

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     Coach,

    Are you capabable of bringing in a group before school and another after.  Front 7 early, Outside the Box later?

  • #31380

    Vince148
    Participant

     If you’re training 3 days a week, how do you incorporate speed, COD, and conditioning workouts with the tier system?

  • #31271

    coachsell75
    Participant

    [QUOTE]Big House wrote

     Coach,

    Are you capabable of bringing in a group before school and another after.  Front 7 early, Outside the Box later?

    [/QUOTE]

     

    Coach,

     

    I’ve been toying with this idea recently.  I was thinking of bringing in our track athletes in the morning and everyone else in the afternoon.  However, we are getting a new head football coach so he may have other plans.  We are meeting withhim this week and He will be on campus officially next Monday.  I’ll just try to sell him on the program and go from there.  Thanks for all the options and advice.  Congrats on the win yesterday and good luck in the super bowl.

     

    Coach Sell

  • #31381

    david
    Participant

    Hi Coach,

    wanted to say I really enjoyed the front safety squat instructional video and what safety bar squats do you recommend? And do you have any instructional videos of the dumbell power pull? I know it is a simple exercise, but like the front safety squat bar video, it is the little details that make the fifference

     

    thank you

    david

  • #31371

    coachsell75
    Participant

     I’m curious about this as well.  I was just informed that our new head coach really wnats me to focus on lateral speed this summer. Any thoughts or ideas that anyone can throw out here would be great.  Thanks 

  • #31372

    Msnyder
    Participant

     I think this will be covered at EADs 3.0 in April.

    I know that is not the answer you were necessarily looking for, but it will be addressed there according to site.
     

    I am in a situation where our Head Coach runs the speed and agility program. It is one of those situations where they have “speed” days, but after a few reps it is really just conditioning. 

  • #31373

    coachsell75
    Participant

     Msnyder, where are you located? I’m in Texas.  Our new Head Coach just officially gave me the title of S&C coordinator a couple of weeks ago.  The only thing he has really said that he wants is to lift for 45 minutes and run for 45 minutes.  He wants a lot of lateral speed stuff.  I defenitley don’t want it to turn into just conditioning.  I’m going to try and talk him into having  a conditioning only day every week.  I don’t know if he’ll agree to it but it never hurts to ask.  

  • #31374

    Msnyder
    Participant

     Trinity High School in Louisville, KY

    Hopefully I will see you at EADs. Myself and a couple other coaches from my area will be making the trip down.

  • #31375

    tcobb52
    Participant

    We do our linear/lateral speed and conditioning on Tue/Thur, my basic template lays out like this:

     

    1. Stationary Dynamic Warm-up (Parisi stuff.. Jumping jacks, pogos, squats, scorpions, iron cross, pushups etc…)

    2. Sationary Upper/Lower running mechanics : seated arm action, lying knee drive, standing knee lift series

    3. Then I get them all on the goal line and we do walking mobility (knee hug, hip flex & lunge, tin soldiers, bear crawls etc.)

                        *** early in the off season I lengthen the distance to help facilitate recovery from the previous season and add a bit of GPP

    4. SID’s: A-march, A-skip, A- run, shuffle, side run, backward run, falling start

    ****Tuesdays we do 5A and Thursdays 5B

    5A. Decel Mechanics: sprint/shuffle/side run/ back pedal with a stop. ***This is huge with the younger kids, it’s amazing how our better athletes have trouble with             this and its great because there is immediate feedback.

    5B. Plyo+Accelerate- Squat jump/broad jump/side jump + stick + sprint . Looking for a great stick at the landing, shifting bodyweight and accelerate 5-10yds. I love these drills because you can get a bunch of athletes going at once, there’s automatic feedback, the athlete feels their weight shift and if they false step or not.

     

    ***This takes about 25-30 min, Next we get into different drills, some guys call this the county fair circuit and a just a gut check but you can get a lot of quality work done and not turn it into just conditioning if you’re smart about the number of stations, kids per station and how you rotate through the station. 

     

    1. Resisted Sprints- I made 6 wooden sleds (my version of the ram sleds)

                                        Tue: push from the bottom for 20yards

                                        Thur: push from the top for 40 yards

    2. Starts: push-up starts, mountain climber starts, scramble ups ( hammering the first 10-20yds)

    3. Programmed Agility: Tue- Pro agility, Thur- L-drill

    4. Bags: 1 foot, 2 foot, shuffle over, side run over, shuffle weave, sp/bp weave

    5. Speed ladder : everyone’s favorite drills

    6. MB throws : backward cannonball, fwd cannon ball, broad jump + chest pass

     

    Then we do team conditioning: modified 1/2 gassers or 110’s (I break it up where OTB runs 110, Box runs 100 and F7 runs 90)

     

    The last thing we do is each coach in charge of a stations counts loafs during each group and we tally it up and do up-downs to pay the piper

    The first day we did 65… yesterday we did 20 so the guys are getting better. The kids that played Basketball come back to us Mon so hopefully that trend will continue. 

     

    Looking for any input! Always looking for better/ more efficient way of doing things.

     

     

  • #31376

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     Coaches,

    1st – We will not be discussing a tiered running template and 3.0.  This was a project that one of my assistants was working on and it has since been tabled.  He was promoted to Athletic Performance Analyst and spend the majority of his time analyzing GPS data.

     

    2nd – With regards to a tiered appraoch to speed/condo work, I believe it is harder than you think.  We have had a difficult time of agreeing on how to tier COD, LINEAR, LATERAL, TEMPO/CONDITIONING, DRILL PREP, and PLYO’s into a properly planned approach.  Maybe someone out there who is smarter than us and has a greater understanding of putting together a multi-faceted running session could be of some help.  The probelm I see is that most programs availabe to study come from sprint coaches.  They only have to focus on one specific trait.  We have numerous traits to enhance.

     

    3rd – That is a pretty extensive session you have posted.  There is a lot of quality work being accomplished.

     

    WORDS WIN

    Coach HOUSE

     

  • #31382

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     Thanks for the feedback.  No we do not have anything on DB Power Pull.  We do not utilize this movement at this time.  I recommend the Elite FTS SS YOKE BAR.  Just bought one for my facility and will be adding 8 for my team’s facility.

     

    WORDS WIN

    Coach HOUSE

  • #31377

    coachsell75
    Participant

    [QUOTE]Msnyder wrote

     Trinity High School in Louisville, KY

    Hopefully I will see you at EADs. Myself and a couple other coaches from my area will be making the trip down.

    [/QUOTE]

     

    I’ll be there.  Just got approval from our head coach to go.  I’m beyond fired up!  

  • #31261

    coachsell75
    Participant

     What is the groups thought on the elite template for high school football players?  

  • #31262

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     My thought is keep it simple.  95% of the freshmen athletes I coached in college weren’t prepared for our block zero program let alone a more advacned training template.

     

    Words Win,

    Coach Kenn

  • #31263

    coachsell75
    Participant

    [QUOTE]Big House wrote

     My thought is keep it simple.  95% of the freshmen athletes I coached in college weren’t prepared for our block zero program let alone a more advacned training template.

     

    Words Win,

    Coach Kenn

    [/QUOTE]

     

    Sounds good.  Simple is always good.

    Thanks Coach!

  • #31272

    coachsell75
    Participant

     Sorry for all of the questions.  Here is what I am planning on for the rest of this semester through  the summer.  

    Using the traditional template when we get back from spring break.

     

    Weeks 1-4: Strength Endurance 80% training cycle

    Weeks 5-8: Developmental Strength 87.5% training cycle

    Weeks 9-12: Explosive Strength 75% training cycle

    Weeks 13-16: Maximum Strength: 90% training cycle

     

    Does this look good, what do/should I change?  I look forward to all of your suggestions.  The training cycles at the back of the book are throwing me for a loop.  The book says T1 is 6 sets b ut then it has 5 sets in the training cycles.  Am I reading it wrong?  

     

    Thanks again!

     

     

  • #31383

    tcobb52
    Participant

     Coach Kenn,

     

    Could you give an example of your Field Grid you referred to yesterday in your twitter post? Thanks.

  • #31273

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     I recommend 6 working sets for the college are athlete and 5 sets for High School.  Those charts are solid charts and I had a trmendous amount of success with them.  At this time, I primarily use my Prilipen Rules and VAT charts for training, with some variable sub max effort special cycles.

     

    Coach Kenn

  • #31384

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    The Field Grid is a constantly moving “movement preparation” for running and conditioning work.  It is sideline to sideline, with work occurring between the numbers and active movements on the sidelines.  The sideline work is 10 yards in length, so the grid is the size of a rectangle.  Your work is what ever drills you deem necessary for prep. Walking Rdl’s, Skips etc.  We utilize crawling as our sideline work.

     

    Coach Kenn

  • #31274

    coachsell75
    Participant

    Thanks for the clarification Coach. 

     

    With your VAT charts, do you increase the percentages after every four week cycle?

  • #31275

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    The VAT charts are flat loaded percents and increased rep per set programs for the 4 week cycle.  Therefore, I may change the VAT Rep scheme but, I will not increase the percentages for a specific cycle.  If I like a specific rep scheme cycle, I will max the athlete and then repeat the same cycle with a new max. A max I hope will be more than previous cycle.

     

    WORDS WIN

    Coach Kenn

  • #31283

    coachsell75
    Participant

    For our summer program I am considering a strength endurance cycle for the six weeks that we are allowed in Texas by the UIL. My reasoning is based on the fact that our running program will be substanially increased from our off-season program.  What thoughts do you all have about this? Thanks for any and all input

     

    David

  • #31284

    Msnyder
    Participant

     Is the running going to be conditioning based…lots of yardage? If so I’d think it should be fine. You typically want to try and mirror the running and lifting.

  • #31285

    coachsell75
    Participant

     Yes sir, it will be. Thanks for the response.  

  • #31385

    tcobb52
    Participant

     Coach,

     

    In your Summer 2009 Linear/Lateral Speed Template, you have drills labeled competitive and pure competitive. Can you elaborate the differences of those and what linear/lateral drills you like to incorporate with those. Thanks.

  • #31386

    tcobb52
    Participant

     Coach,

     

    In your Summer 2009 Linear/Lateral Speed Template, you have drills labeled competitive and pure competitive. Can you elaborate the differences of those and what linear/lateral drills you like to incorporate with those. Thanks.

  • #31388

    bb24
    Participant

    Does anyone have suggestions or samples for a rejuvenation block? Are people still utlilizing a system like discussed in the strength coaches’ playbook?

     

    For my collegiate throwers, I am considering using a re-visit of the block zero bodyweight movements and a bodybuilding style circuit for the first part of the rejuvenation block. If I do that I’d like to have the second half of the rejuvenation block be a lead-in to a VAT cycle but I haven’t figured that out yet.

     

    Any thoughts or suggestions would be appreciated. Thanks.

  • #31286

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Coach

     

     I agree with Coach Snyder, but I would also think about spltting the 6 weeks into 2 blocks of 3 weeks each.  Cycle 1 could be longer based interval work, therefore a strength endurance training cycle in the weight room and then in Cycle 2 you could still keep the yardage high, but shorter intervals, possibly some pattern running programs.  In the weight room you could then go to more sets less reps with a minimal amount af rest for a sub max effort cycle.  Just some thoughts.

     

    Words Win

    Coach Kenn

  • #31387

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     Pure Competitive was someone attached or in drill (mirror dodge) Competitive was multiple people going in a single rep with a designated winner

     

    Words Win

    Coach Kenn

  • #31389

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     Coach,

    I think you are 100% correct in the direction you are looking at as far as your Rejuvenation Stage.  With the amount of strength training a thrower performs during the year, a Bodyweight/Bodybuilding circuit program is a terrific idea.  Depending on how long your block is, I would consider this for the entire period of time, especially if it is only 4 weeks.

     

    Great thought on utilizing block zero concepts.

     

    Words Win

    Coach Kenn

  • #31390

    Coach Rashad
    Participant

     This thread can go for anyone who reads it. I recently accepted a position with a post graduate/sports performance facilty as the Director of Sports Performance. In meetings leading up to accepting, I found myself promoting the hell out of the place via word of mouth prior to even accepting the position. Now that I have accepted, I am trying to find more interesting ways to promote and bring attention to a place that has not necessarily been known for sports performance training but rather a basketball heavy post grad opportunity for kids/families not getting the recruitment they were expecting. Few questions:

     

    – Other than social media what type of maketing should I pursue?

     

    – How do I promote my brand while still tying in the companies? (I’m in a position to still recruit post grad “basketball” opportunities to families)

     

    – I do not want to be labeled a basketball guy or just a football guy. I want be a performance/strength COACH!

     

    Thanks for any response.

    Coach Rashad

     

  • #31391

    Coach Rashad
    Participant

     This thread can go for anyone who reads it. I recently accepted a position with a post graduate/sports performance facilty as the Director of Sports Performance. In meetings leading up to accepting, I found myself promoting the hell out of the place via word of mouth prior to even accepting the position. Now that I have accepted, I am trying to find more interesting ways to promote and bring attention to a place that has not necessarily been known for sports performance training but rather a basketball heavy post grad opportunity for kids/families not getting the recruitment they were expecting. Few questions:

     

    – Other than social media what type of maketing should I pursue?

     

    – How do I promote my brand while still tying in the companies? (I’m in a position to still recruit post grad “basketball” opportunities to families)

     

    – I do not want to be labeled a basketball guy or just a football guy. I want be a performance/strength COACH!

     

    Thanks for any response.

    Coach Rashad

     

  • #31393

    Hinton32
    Participant

     I have some doubts about my tier system workouts about lift selection and volume. I also feel like my athletes don’t select the right weight for lifts. They either go to heavy and form sucks or they go to light and don’t push themselves. What percentage of max do you use for 5 x 5 and other sets and reps. I have a point system to try and motivate them. Instead of OTS sets a call them eagle pride reps. If they a e doing 5 x 5 and on the 5th set they get 7 they get 2 EPR points. But I want to make sure they are selecting the right weight based on percentage of their 1RM.  Could I I email you guys my workout cards to see what you think?

  • #31394

    Hinton32
    Participant

     I have some doubts about my tier system workouts about lift selection and volume. I also feel like my athletes don’t select the right weight for lifts. They either go to heavy and form sucks or they go to light and don’t push themselves. What percentage of max do you use for 5 x 5 and other sets and reps. I have a point system to try and motivate them. Instead of OTS sets a call them eagle pride reps. If they a e doing 5 x 5 and on the 5th set they get 7 they get 2 EPR points. But I want to make sure they are selecting the right weight based on percentage of their 1RM.  Could I I email you guys my workout cards to see what you think?

  • #31392

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     Head to Tournaments and introduce yourself to coaches etc.  Bring Flyers.  Best marketing is you athletes and their parents pumping you up

  • #31395

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     For sets and rep percentage ranges I highly recommend Prilepin’s Chart

  • #31396

    coachsell75
    Participant

     Good morning gents,

     

    I found out yesterday that our head coach is giving me 30 minutes to lift our kids during the season.  I was thinking of running a VAT cycle during the season.  I would like to keep the same intensity so we are able to maximize the time limit we have without changing weight every set.  I would love to hear your thoughts/ideas regarding in-season training.

     

    Thanks guys,

    Sell
     

  • #31397

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    In VAT trainingyou do change the weight every set.  You do not change the weight each week. I do not recommend this as each week the overall volume increases. If you are going to use a percentage based cycle, I recommend 80-90% at Prilepin Low Volume parameters. 

     

    WORDS WIN

    Coach House

  • #31398

    coachsell75
    Participant

     Thanks Coach! 

  • #31399

    tcobb52
    Participant

     Coach,

     

    Do you have any instructions/directions on how you built your wooden boxes seen in the jump training progressions video. Im trying to get my high school shop class to build some for us. thanks.

  • #31400

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     I am not a handy man! My brother in law made these for me.  They are built with a box frame of 2×4 and a 3/4″ ply wood top.  He used screws and not nails.  We built 1ft squared tops and 2 foot squared tops for boxes. Hope this helps.  I am not sure I have these anymore. I may have one at home.  If so the next time I am there I will take some photos.  I donated them to a couple of gyms near my house.

     

  • #31401

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     I am not a handy man! My brother in law made these for me.  They are built with a box frame of 2×4 and a 3/4″ ply wood top.  He used screws and not nails.  We built 1ft squared tops and 2 foot squared tops for boxes. Hope this helps.  I am not sure I have these anymore. I may have one at home.  If so the next time I am there I will take some photos.  I donated them to a couple of gyms near my house.

     

  • #31402

    tcobb52
    Participant

     Did Coach Mcknight speak at the clinic? If he did, is his presentation on the DVDs? Thanks.

  • #31403

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     yes he did speak, His presentation is not on DVD’s.  We had a plan for his information. I will check with Mike and see what we are doing with it?

  • #31404

    tcobb52
    Participant

     Thanks Coach!

     

    Also, I’ve been watching your prep work on instagram or twitter, also the video on the home page, and I was wondering how your using bands for prep work and how to set it up. I really like your the neck work but not smart enough to figure how your band setup. Being a school where we have 120 kids in our athletic period, and not enough money or space for various machines, bands are huge in my programming. I’m always looking for more ways to incorporate them. Thanks

  • #31405

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     will work on a video to show you set up

  • #31406

    tcobb52
    Participant

     Coach,

     

    Is grip 4 bench press where you would have your index fingers where the knurling meets the smooth part of the bar? Thanks.

  • #31407

    tcobb52
    Participant

     Coach,

     

    Is grip 4 bench press where you would have your index fingers where the knurling meets the smooth part of the bar? Thanks.

  • #31408

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     correct – Grip 5 Index on smooth, Grip Six index , middle on smooth

  • #31409

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     correct – Grip 5 Index on smooth, Grip Six index , middle on smooth

  • #31410

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    Look for a new web design in thevery near future.  We are hoping it is easier to navigate for our subscribers.  We will be adding new content through small video clinics as our main way to get you new content on a consistant basis.

     

    Thank you for your continued support

     

    BIG HOUSE POWER

  • #31411

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     thanks coach, looking forward to it

  • #31412

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

     Because of the amount of content on the site it is taking longer than expected.  I want them to do it right.  I think a lot of the material that was offered to our paid members was not in a organized position for you to find.  I hope the new site fixes that as well as the overall aesthetics of  the site will improve greatly

     

    Words Win

  • #31413

    Coach Rashad
    Participant

     Good morning everyone!

     

    I currently work with a post graduate basketball team and have come across a major issue with hip hinging. A couple of the very explosive athletes that I am

     

    working with have a very shallow ROM with bending/squatting. AndThe issue that I have come across is that they are pretty good with abduction so for the past

     

    few months I have incorporated band adduction, overhead squatting, and pole squats (where they clasp their hands together around a pole and squat as deep as

     

    possible). These are all in succession to mobility work, and I currently am still having the same issue with these guys. Any feedback would be helpful!.

     

    Thanks!

  • #31414

    @wesomeWG
    Keymaster

    It is hard to say without the ability to be there and watch them perform movements – Any way I can see some video?

    Words Win

    Coach Kenn

  • #31415

    Coach Rashad
    Participant

     Yes I will record and can send via email or or text. Or if there is a way to post to the site I can do that as well.

    Thanks Big House!

  • The topic ‘General’ is closed to new replies.

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